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  #941  
Old Posted May 29, 2020, 1:09 AM
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Rubenstein Forum: 05.28.2020





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  #942  
Old Posted Jun 24, 2020, 9:29 PM
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The Rubenstein Forum from early today:



...then, if you turn your head to the left, the new Study hotel is basically almost all the way up!



I was totally shocked by how quickly this had gone up

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  #943  
Old Posted Jun 25, 2020, 4:47 AM
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Question:
Why don't (some) hotels have basements or underground foundations? I noticed that with the Sophy Hotel, too. They just built it right on top of the ground--like the Study--whereas the Rubinstein had a dug down foundation. I think that's why the Study went up so fast.
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  #944  
Old Posted Jun 25, 2020, 7:37 AM
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The Rubinstein looks absolutely stunning!

How are the new dorms under construction one block to the south of the Rubenstein looking?
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  #945  
Old Posted Jun 25, 2020, 1:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Gedung Tinngi View Post
The Rubinstein looks absolutely stunning!

How are the new dorms under construction one block to the south of the Rubenstein looking?
The dorms look good, appear to be fully constructed, perhaps still working on interiors(?). I forgot to take pictures as I was marveling at the Rubenstein. The tallest dorm building creates quite a presence on the south end of campus, as does the Rubenstein and the new hotel.
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  #946  
Old Posted Jun 25, 2020, 2:02 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WestsideLA View Post
Question:
Why don't (some) hotels have basements or underground foundations? I noticed that with the Sophy Hotel, too. They just built it right on top of the ground--like the Study--whereas the Rubinstein had a dug down foundation. I think that's why the Study went up so fast.
It depends on the hotel/situation. Most hotels have surface or first floor back of house and loading docks for easy access delivery of goods, laundry services, etc. Although there are some hotels in Chicago that have lower levels/basements (such as the Radisson Blu in the Aqua, the Fairmont, the Renaissance) all of which benefit from being adjacent to lower Wacker which provides back of house ease of access, away from busy streets above where loading docks would be tricky to do.
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  #947  
Old Posted Jun 25, 2020, 2:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WestsideLA View Post
Question:
Why don't (some) hotels have basements or underground foundations? I noticed that with the Sophy Hotel, too. They just built it right on top of the ground--like the Study--whereas the Rubinstein had a dug down foundation. I think that's why the Study went up so fast.
You answered your own question, sort of... developers in Chicago avoid building basements on large buildings whenever possible. This is due to the cost of soil retention/dewatering and the extra months/years it adds to the construction schedule. Sometimes there's no choice, though (like One Chicago).
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  #948  
Old Posted Jun 25, 2020, 3:14 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sentinel View Post
It depends on the hotel/situation. Most hotels have surface or first floor back of house and loading docks for easy access delivery of goods, laundry services, etc. Although there are some hotels in Chicago that have lower levels/basements (such as the Radisson Blu in the Aqua, the Fairmont, the Renaissance) all of which benefit from being adjacent to lower Wacker which provides back of house ease of access, away from busy streets above where loading docks would be tricky to do.
An example of a hotel in Chicago with a basement not extended to below street grade would be the Home2Suites at 110 W Huron.
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  #949  
Old Posted Jun 25, 2020, 9:04 PM
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Originally Posted by ardecila View Post
You answered your own question, sort of... developers in Chicago avoid building basements on large buildings whenever possible. This is due to the cost of soil retention/dewatering and the extra months/years it adds to the construction schedule. Sometimes there's no choice, though (like One Chicago).
So there's no real structural reason for an underground foundation in Chicago? I'm just asking because the Study Hotel and Rubenstein Forum are side by side, as you know. They spent months digging out the foundation for the Rubenstein, but the Study Hotel is just as tall, or so it appears, and yet they built it at ground level.

Maybe this changes for a tall skyscraper but I guess at lower level you can get away with a ground level foundation.

I ask this as a layman. I'm not in the contraction business and don't really know the engineering considerations.
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  #950  
Old Posted Jun 25, 2020, 9:25 PM
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Originally Posted by sentinel View Post
The dorms look good, appear to be fully constructed, perhaps still working on interiors(?). I forgot to take pictures as I was marveling at the Rubenstein. The tallest dorm building creates quite a presence on the south end of campus, as does the Rubenstein and the new hotel.
UChicago posted an interior tour of Woodlawn Commons:
https://v1.panoskin.com/?tour=5eb5c381d563b7343258248d
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  #951  
Old Posted Jun 26, 2020, 3:28 AM
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Originally Posted by WestsideLA View Post
So there's no real structural reason for an underground foundation in Chicago? I'm just asking because the Study Hotel and Rubenstein Forum are side by side, as you know. They spent months digging out the foundation for the Rubenstein, but the Study Hotel is just as tall, or so it appears, and yet they built it at ground level.

Maybe this changes for a tall skyscraper but I guess at lower level you can get away with a ground level foundation.

I ask this as a layman. I'm not in the contraction business and don't really know the engineering considerations.
The basement isn't a requirement of a deep foundation system. You build a basement because you need the extra space, especially for things that are necessary but unattractive (parking, storage, utility stuff). A deep foundation in Chicago is usually a caisson system, and you can drill caissons from ground level just as easily as from Level -1.

This is for large commercial projects, of course. For homes, especially small ones, the need to put (shallow) foundations below the frost line at 5 feet down means you're already basically doing all the work to dig out a basement space, so you can either backfill that space after the foundations are poured and waste the effort, or pour a basement floor while you have it dug out and put it to good use.
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  #952  
Old Posted Jun 26, 2020, 4:59 AM
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Originally Posted by ardecila View Post
The basement isn't a requirement of a deep foundation system. You build a basement because you need the extra space, especially for things that are necessary but unattractive (parking, storage, utility stuff). A deep foundation in Chicago is usually a caisson system, and you can drill caissons from ground level just as easily as from Level -1.

This is for large commercial projects, of course. For homes, especially small ones, the need to put (shallow) foundations below the frost line at 5 feet down means you're already basically doing all the work to dig out a basement space, so you can either backfill that space after the foundations are poured and waste the effort, or pour a basement floor while you have it dug out and put it to good use.
Thanks!!
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