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  #21  
Old Posted Feb 24, 2021, 12:36 PM
VKChaz VKChaz is offline
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Chicago Plan Commission Draft Presentation:

https://www.chicago.gov/content/dam/...t_cpc_pres.pdf
Aside from the street grid, is the expectation Prairie Shores stays as is? I would have liked to see some of that surface parking removed with a more urban design that better integrates Reese to the west.
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  #22  
Old Posted Feb 27, 2021, 5:23 PM
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Prairie Shores is under the same ownership as Michael Reese. I doubt they feel the need to build on the parking lots and anger their current tenants when they have so much land next door.

On the other hand they should at the very least remove the gates along King Drive so that you can get from the bus to the new Michael Reese buildings. Right now Prairie Shores is like a fortress when seen from King Drive, the gates are sometimes locked and sometimes unlocked or broken, it's not predictable.
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  #23  
Old Posted Feb 27, 2021, 6:44 PM
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Originally Posted by VKChaz View Post
Aside from the street grid, is the expectation Prairie Shores stays as is? I would have liked to see some of that surface parking removed with a more urban design that better integrates Reese to the west.
A clubhouse for recreation and retail is being built on one of the surface lots, and should be finished sometime this year


https://rejournals.com/farpoint-and-...rairie-shores/
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  #24  
Old Posted Mar 3, 2021, 2:10 AM
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Prairie Shores probably won't see any significant change until Phase 2 is completely built out 20+ years. They'll knock down Prairie Shores before they build over the Metra tracks.
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  #25  
Old Posted Mar 3, 2021, 3:08 PM
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^ I doubt it. The cheapest building is the one that already exists. Prairie Shores might be infilled or the towers re-clad, but it's unlikely they would get any higher density after a tear-down so I'd be very surprised if they did.

As for building over the Metra tracks (really the marshaling yard, the tracks would remain uncovered) I am also skeptical that this can be done, at least without a lot of public money involved. 155 N Riverside was able to deck over the Union Station tracks at no cost to the public, but that was kind of a special case. I believe (A) the air rights were discounted and (B) the site was developed at high density and commands top-tier rents. Michael Reese will have a lower allowed density and a far lower income stream to offset the cost of the deck.
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  #26  
Old Posted Mar 4, 2021, 1:16 AM
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If there is the demand the developer is assuming for a 3rd Phase, it will not be located over the Metra tracks it will replace Prairie Shores. *I should add that it may be infill but they will not build over those tracks.
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  #27  
Old Posted Mar 4, 2021, 2:33 AM
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Originally Posted by UPChicago View Post
If there is the demand the developer is assuming for a 3rd Phase, it will not be located over the Metra tracks it will replace Prairie Shores. *I should add that it may be infill but they will not build over those tracks.
Incorrect... Phase 3 would be the Marshaling Yards just east of the tracks. There's an image on page 1.

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  #28  
Old Posted Mar 4, 2021, 7:12 PM
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Oh, I see so they're proposing a bridge at 26th street. Well that's more realistic I suppose.
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  #29  
Old Posted May 9, 2021, 4:27 PM
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https://www.chicagobusiness.com/comm...infrastructure

City to fund $60M in Michael Reese site infrastructure

The taxpayer-funded plan is part of a broader arrangement that will help move forward a proposal to transform the 48-acre property into a mixed-use campus.

DANNY ECKER



Quote:
The City of Chicago plans to foot the bill for around $60 million in new roads and other infrastructure running through the former Michael Reese hospital site, part of a deal meant to kickstart the first phase of a plan to turn the sprawling Bronzeville property into a mixed-use campus.

In a key step toward that goal, the developers behind the 48-acre, $3.8 billion project planned for the city-owned site just south of McCormick Place will go before the Chicago Community Development Commission next week, seeking approval of an agreement to buy the property for nearly $97 million, according to sources familiar with the deal.

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The financial arrangement—which requires approval of the Community Development Commission and the full City Council—stands to clear one of the last major public hurdles for the developers to begin work on a megaproject that would redraw a high-profile swath of the Near South Side lakefront with nearly 8 million square feet of buildings.

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The use of taxpayer funding to finance infrastructure for megaprojects generated controversy when the city approved Sterling Bay's Lincoln Yards campus on the North Side and Related Midwest's plan for the 78 in the South Loop in 2019. Both rely on tax-increment financing to reimburse the developers for infrastructure work they finance up front.

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Among other projects that would improve access to the site and revive its street grid, the developers plan to extend Cottage Grove Avenue as a main thoroughfare running through the project, extend Lake Park and Vernon avenues, and add extensions of 27th, 29th and 30th streets running east-west across the property.
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  #30  
Old Posted May 9, 2021, 9:18 PM
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Good to hear on the street extensions. Any place where the city can repair the street grid, it should be done without hesitation. Is Prairie Shores part of the Michael Reese redevelopment? It would be great if the 27th, 29th and 30th extensions reach out to MLK Dr! Ditto for Cottage Grove through Lake Meadows to connect with the rest of the street south of 33rd.
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  #31  
Old Posted May 11, 2021, 6:03 PM
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Michael Reese Site Primed For $97 Million Sale As ‘Bronzeville Lakefront’ Edges Closer To Reality
Alex Nitkin, The Daily Line | 8:47 AM CDT on May 11, 2021

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The $4 billion “Bronzeville Lakefront” megadevelopment is set to clear a critical hurdle on Tuesday as a Chicago commission moves to sell a 48-acre swath of public land to a private development venture for $96.9 million.

The city’s Community Development Commission is set to virtually convene at 1 p.m. Tuesday to consider four sales of city-owned land, including the sale of part of the property on the city’s Near South lakefront that was occupied for decades by Michael Reese Hospital.

The commission is set to ink the sale on the condition that the development team commits to a lengthy list of “public benefits,” including more than 1,300 affordable homes set for construction during the project’s multi-decade timeline. The sale must also be approved by the City Council.

City planning officials are separately negotiating a redevelopment agreement with the developers that could convey tens of millions of dollars in public funding for infrastructure in and around the project, Crain’s reported on Friday.
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  #32  
Old Posted Jul 21, 2021, 5:05 PM
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  #33  
Old Posted Jul 21, 2021, 5:15 PM
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^ that's a rendering from 2017, way outdated

There aren't final renderings for the site, only individual buildings, but the current phases west of the Metra tracks expect towers up to 400 ft. The future phases east of Metra are expected to have towers up to 800 ft.
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  #34  
Old Posted Jul 21, 2021, 5:22 PM
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^ that's a rendering from 2017, way outdated
Gotcha. Thanks!
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  #35  
Old Posted Jul 22, 2021, 10:12 PM
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Mega-development’ for the Chicago's South Side gets official nod

The Chicago City Council has approved the sale of the former Michael Reese Hospital site and zoning for a $4 billion mixed-use redevelopment, inching the proposed Bronzeville lakefront project closer to breaking ground...

https://www.msn.com/en-us/money/real...nod/ar-AAMrJyn
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  #36  
Old Posted Jul 22, 2021, 10:51 PM
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Bronzeville Lakefront, Lincoln Yards, The 78, and North Union are all on track to break ground on their first buildings this year. Will be interesting to see which megadevelopment begins first
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  #37  
Old Posted Jul 23, 2021, 4:55 PM
rivernorthlurker rivernorthlurker is offline
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Bronzeville Lakefront, Lincoln Yards, The 78, and North Union are all on track to break ground on their first buildings this year. Will be interesting to see which megadevelopment begins first
Potential of Chicago nationally is flying way under the radar IMO.
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  #38  
Old Posted Jul 23, 2021, 5:05 PM
BuildThemTaller BuildThemTaller is online now
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Potential of Chicago nationally is flying way under the radar IMO.
Eh, that's always been the view of people from Chicago. Truth is that a lot of cities are undergoing a big transformation right now. Look at Austin, Nashville, even Philly and their 30th Street Station redevelopment. Chicago's profile is going to lag behind what's happening because that's sort of how it works.

The first thing that needs to happen for Chicago is to stop losing net population. Once the city population starts to grow again, that's when the national perception - those that haven't been paying attention to what's really happening, at least - will take notice. If the 2030 Census shows population gain for Chicago, for example, expect a bunch of articles with the headline 'Is Chicago the next cool city?' By then, they'll have been behind the curve for more than a decade.
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  #39  
Old Posted Jul 23, 2021, 5:15 PM
rivernorthlurker rivernorthlurker is offline
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Originally Posted by BuildThemTaller View Post
Eh, that's always been the view of people from Chicago. Truth is that a lot of cities are undergoing a big transformation right now. Look at Austin, Nashville, even Philly and their 30th Street Station redevelopment. Chicago's profile is going to lag behind what's happening because that's sort of how it works.

The first thing that needs to happen for Chicago is to stop losing net population. Once the city population starts to grow again, that's when the national perception - those that haven't been paying attention to what's really happening, at least - will take notice. If the 2030 Census shows population gain for Chicago, for example, expect a bunch of articles with the headline 'Is Chicago the next cool city?' By then, they'll have been behind the curve for more than a decade.
I'm not originally from Chicago but have lived here a while. I just feel like development and culture wise Chicago is starting to finally turn a corner (which I did not feel originally). I could be wrong though and admittedly am much more attuned to development here than other cities. Population growth isn't spontaneous and takes a nuanced attractive quality work/play/energy environment and so I see many of these developments (plus Riverwalk/Fulton/Ohare etc) all combining into the right formula to spur that.

Austin/Nashville and even Philly are on much smaller scale than Chicago as urban centers but to each his own. I will look more closely at the Philly development you mentioned thank you for pointing that out.
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  #40  
Old Posted Jul 23, 2021, 5:31 PM
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Originally Posted by rivernorthlurker View Post
Potential of Chicago nationally is flying way under the radar IMO.
This is true for as long as I've been alive. Chicago always flies under the radar. Even for tech, which pales in comparison to the Bay Area , NYC, and LA...it has produced more "unicorn" companies this year than anywhere outside of nyc and the Bay Area (even more than LA and Boston) but not a ton of press.

Anyway, a lot of cities are going thru a lot of development right now but these megadevelopments are usually the ones that make more national news. I'm sure once The 78, Lincoln Yards, and this start construction maybe it'll get more press nationally.

I think living in Chicago pretty much always means that outsiders or the national media will apply a 30+ year old stereotype to you or at times overlook you.

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Originally Posted by BuildThemTaller View Post
Eh, that's always been the view of people from Chicago. Truth is that a lot of cities are undergoing a big transformation right now. Look at Austin, Nashville, even Philly and their 30th Street Station redevelopment. Chicago's profile is going to lag behind what's happening because that's sort of how it works.
Even here in Long Island City in NYC where we currently live, there's like 3-4 sizable high rises going up on our block and then right across the river there's like 4 more that are pretty large - all on the river. This barely even makes the news nationally for the record but it's all together basically the size of the planned development of the new high rises on Goose Island in Chicago.

Quote:
The first thing that needs to happen for Chicago is to stop losing net population. Once the city population starts to grow again, that's when the national perception - those that haven't been paying attention to what's really happening, at least - will take notice. If the 2030 Census shows population gain for Chicago, for example, expect a bunch of articles with the headline 'Is Chicago the next cool city?' By then, they'll have been behind the curve for more than a decade.
Well yes - that also has to do with media as well and the Census getting their story right. No matter what happened, there was always shit. Most of the years between 2010 and 2019, Chicago didn't actually lose population. It gained population, but a little bit. The media still either spun it to say Chicago was losing population or that it was too stagnant. There is really no winning here. And as we all know, or should know by now, the Census estimates were off by literally 14X for the state. There is no telling what the reality is until sometime later when the data is released but there's even a possibility that Chicago officially didn't even lose population at all between 2010 and 2020. It should be a warning to literally everyone to take the Census estimates every year with a grain of salt and the media shouldn't be paying as much attention to it IMO.

All of these things help of course because it's marketing - so I'm not denying that, but there's a lot of weirdness with how media chooses to do this.
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Last edited by marothisu; Jul 23, 2021 at 6:00 PM.
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