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  #2161  
Old Posted Jul 28, 2018, 9:14 PM
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Originally Posted by SFBuildings888 View Post
Why aren’t they building high rises buildings in the Mission Bay district? Is it cause developers aren’t allowed to?
Yes . . . and that's because:

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It's a bird, it's a plane, it's Super Burton laying UC low
Phillip Matier, Andrew Ross
Published 4:00 am PST, Sunday, March 17, 2002

Superman may be able to leap tall buildings in a single bound -- but hey, super state Senate President Pro Tem John Burton can do him one better.
He's able to shrink tall buildings with a single call.

And that's just what neighborhood hero Burton did recently when, with one phone call, he single-handedly spiked the University of California at San Francisco's plan to build a 17-story student housing tower on its new Mission Bay campus . . . .

Never mind that the documents clearly allowed UC and Mission Bay to build high-rises of up to 160 feet on Third Street (at that time) . . . .

The dorm's height made Burton's anti-high-rise neighbors unhappy.
And when Burton's constituents are unhappy, Burton is unhappy.

And he's not shy about it, either.

"You're not building any mother-- skyscrapers at the foot of Potrero Hill," Burton, who lives in Potrero Hill, flatly told university officials in December.

To say that Burton's call and tone came as a shock to the UC brass would be an understatement.

After all, this was the guy that could make or break their budget, and not someone to be trifled with.

. . . the whole dorm downsize demand was nothing more than Burton responding to the objections his staff heard at a Potrero Boosters Neighborhood Association meeting late last year.

Indeed, John deCastro, president of the neighborhood association, said his group had been fighting to protect views on the hill and keep San Francisco from becoming "another Miami Beach by walling in the waterfront with massive buildings."
https://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/matie...on-3315909.php

In case you are too young or too new in town to know the name John Burton, he was the brother of San Francisco's long-time Congressman Phil Burton (for whom the Golden Gate Ave. Federal Building is named) and was, at the time all this occured, the city's state Senator and, as the article mentions, State Senate President. He also famously had a short temper and a foul mouth.
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  #2162  
Old Posted Jul 29, 2018, 12:24 AM
SFBuildings888 SFBuildings888 is offline
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Originally Posted by Pedestrian View Post
Yes . . . and that's because:


https://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/matie...on-3315909.php

In case you are too young or too new in town to know the name John Burton, he was the brother of San Francisco's long-time Congressman Phil Burton (for whom the Golden Gate Ave. Federal Building is named) and was, at the time all this occured, the city's state Senator and, as the article mentions, State Senate President. He also famously had a short temper and a foul mouth.
Just my opinion but I just love high rise buildings and wish SF was made into another Manhattan with high rise buildings in every district of the city.
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  #2163  
Old Posted Jul 29, 2018, 1:51 AM
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Just my opinion but I just love high rise buildings and wish SF was made into another Manhattan with high rise buildings in every district of the city.
Mostly I agree with you but I think that if we built tall in places like Mission Bay, Tenderloin, SOMA and along transit corridors like Geary Blvd, we could leave the historic districts of architecturally significant homes (read "Victorians" and "Edwardians") alone. There's plenty of room in the commercial districts that are not currently of any architectural value or historically important.

I would like to see more height and density not for their own sake so much as that what I love about Manhattan is its true 24 hour nature and to achieve that you need incredible population density. San Francisco, even though already quite dense on a national scale, still rolls up a lot of its sidewalks by 10 PM.
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  #2164  
Old Posted Jul 29, 2018, 8:17 AM
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[QUOTE=Pedestrian;8265377]Mostly I agree with you but I think that if we built tall in places like Mission Bay, Tenderloin, SOMA and along transit corridors like Geary Blvd, we could leave the historic districts of architecturally significant homes (read "Victorians" and "Edwardians") alone. There's plenty of room in the commercial districts that are not currently of any architectural value or historically important.

I would like to see more height and density not for their own sake so much as that what I love about Manhattan is its true 24 hour nature and to achieve that you need incredible population density. San Francisco, even though already quite dense on a national scale, still rolls up a lot of its sidewalks by 10 PM.[/QUOTE

It is second to NYC in population density in terms of major US cities. They can continue to build more height and density in its downtown area and SOMA and anywhere developers are allowed to.
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  #2165  
Old Posted Jul 29, 2018, 8:19 AM
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[QUOTE=Pedestrian;8265377]Mostly I agree with you but I think that if we built tall in places like Mission Bay, Tenderloin, SOMA and along transit corridors like Geary Blvd, we could leave the historic districts of architecturally significant homes (read "Victorians" and "Edwardians") alone. There's plenty of room in the commercial districts that are not currently of any architectural value or historically important.

I would like to see more height and density not for their own sake so much as that what I love about Manhattan is its true 24 hour nature and to achieve that you need incredible population density. San Francisco, even though already quite dense on a national scale, still rolls up a lot of its sidewalks by 10 PM.[/QUOTE
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  #2166  
Old Posted Jul 29, 2018, 8:21 AM
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Originally Posted by Pedestrian View Post
Mostly I agree with you but I think that if we built tall in places like Mission Bay, Tenderloin, SOMA and along transit corridors like Geary Blvd, we could leave the historic districts of architecturally significant homes (read "Victorians" and "Edwardians") alone. There's plenty of room in the commercial districts that are not currently of any architectural value or historically important.

I would like to see more height and density not for their own sake so much as that what I love about Manhattan is its true 24 hour nature and to achieve that you need incredible population density. San Francisco, even though already quite dense on a national scale, still rolls up a lot of its sidewalks by 10 PM.

It is second to NYC in population density in terms of major US cities. They can continue to build more height and density in its downtown area and SOMA and anywhere developers are allowed to.
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  #2167  
Old Posted Jul 30, 2018, 3:45 AM
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I think the street nightlife is getting better overall in terms of regular people walking the streets. Of course more people will be great, and I think the next 5 years will be huge after Market from 5th to Van Ness is built out a lot more, moscone finishes its huge expansion, and the central SoMa plan goes through with 8,000 new residences and so many more office workers and hotel tourists are in the city.

I hope this new term in city hall will have some upzoning along BART stations. It even seems like Stonestown leases are being easily filled up which is surprising to me.
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  #2168  
Old Posted Jul 30, 2018, 4:29 AM
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I visited a friend who was staying in this newly-constructed building in SoMa last fall:
https://www.google.com/maps/@37.7725...7i16384!8i8192

San Francisco's inability to build highrises continues to astound me...
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  #2169  
Old Posted Jul 30, 2018, 8:05 AM
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Originally Posted by SIGSEGV View Post
I visited a friend who was staying in this newly-constructed building in SoMa last fall:
https://www.google.com/maps/@37.7725...7i16384!8i8192

San Francisco's inability to build highrises continues to astound me...
SF generally has a lot of high rise buildings considering that this is earthquake country and a lot of the city is built on steep hills. In fact, it has top 5 to 10 (depending on different surveys) most in the country. Just wish there was even more in different districts. That’s all.

Last edited by SFBuildings888; Jul 30, 2018 at 8:17 AM.
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  #2170  
Old Posted Jul 30, 2018, 8:14 AM
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Originally Posted by fimiak View Post
I think the street nightlife is getting better overall in terms of regular people walking the streets. Of course more people will be great, and I think the next 5 years will be huge after Market from 5th to Van Ness is built out a lot more, moscone finishes its huge expansion, and the central SoMa plan goes through with 8,000 new residences and so many more office workers and hotel tourists are in the city.

I hope this new term in city hall will have some upzoning along BART stations. It even seems like Stonestown leases are being easily filled up which is surprising to me.
It seems like in the 90s and before that, SF was nearly a 24 hour city cause there were a lot of people in the streets day and night. Since the 2000s, there seems to be less people out on the streets at night. Maybe I’m wrong, but it feels that way.
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  #2171  
Old Posted Jul 30, 2018, 6:42 PM
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Originally Posted by SFBuildings888 View Post
It seems like in the 90s and before that, SF was nearly a 24 hour city cause there were a lot of people in the streets day and night. Since the 2000s, there seems to be less people out on the streets at night. Maybe I’m wrong, but it feels that way.
I don't remember that. I remember there being about 5 places (perhaps a slight exageration) to get a late night meal . . . including Doggie Diner.
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  #2172  
Old Posted Jul 31, 2018, 10:04 AM
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I don't remember that. I remember there being about 5 places (perhaps a slight exageration) to get a late night meal . . . including Doggie Diner.
I mean, I remember the broadway area had still a lot of people on the streets after midnight. Also, Chinatown had quite a lot of people at night. Doesn’t really seem to be the case anymore.
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  #2173  
Old Posted Aug 4, 2018, 8:00 AM
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I was wondering what was going on with this:

Quote:
Last summer, bids for the first phase of what’s to become Crane Cove Park came in 40 percent over estimates, something David Beaupre, Port of San Francisco senior waterfront planner, said is common in “this heated construction climate.” New proposals were due last month; if one is accepted, construction could begin in late August.
https://www.potreroview.net/construc...in-next-month/
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  #2174  
Old Posted Aug 4, 2018, 7:58 PM
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Originally Posted by 1977 View Post
I was wondering what was going on with this:

https://www.potreroview.net/construc...in-next-month/
thanks for the info - I had really been wondering too.
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  #2175  
Old Posted Aug 7, 2018, 8:18 AM
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the Rutter views... in the foreground, one of the last bits of the old MB street grid (which I think marked the 'far' end of the old golf driving range once upon a time) has been demolished, as well as the former temporary childcare facility







looking south into Dogpatch



Third St



Three Corners



the Uber bridges



on the right side, some of Uber's glass is going up



block 1 hotel



affordable project on Third



block 6E again



it's got a little podium thing going for the ground floor retail (which actually might be 826 Valencia



yay, the utility poles on Terry Francois are definitely going away, they wouldn't leave them in the street!



UCSF housing in Dogpatch



UCSF Psychiatry Center, also Dogpatch



showing how the Precision Cancer Center fits into the original phase of the hospital. the fluorescent green line marks the border of old and new



another angle



the Exchange (future Dropbox)



entrance to the southernmost building



the walk northward down Owens



little plaza at corner of Owens and 16th St



looking from across 16th



a clearer view of UCSF block 23



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  #2176  
Old Posted Aug 9, 2018, 8:49 AM
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It is just too bad this district isn’t allowed to build high rise buildings.
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  #2177  
Old Posted Aug 9, 2018, 9:21 AM
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Originally Posted by SFBuildings888 View Post
It is just too bad this district isn’t allowed to build high rise buildings.
Yes it is because the city may be running out of places it could build enough housing to actually impact the cost in a meaningful way through massive supply. This was one. Candlestick Point and Hunters' Point are others and they are to be pretty low rise as well.
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  #2178  
Old Posted Aug 10, 2018, 12:02 AM
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Ballast Point Brewing plots a San Francisco outpost
Justin Phillips Aug. 9, 2018 Updated: Aug. 9, 2018 1:58 p.m.

San Diego’s rapidly-expanding Ballast Point Brewing Company appears to be in the process of opening an outpost at 705 16th St., marking the brewery’s first Northern California foray.

It is the latest new project headed to the area surrounding the Golden State Warriors’ forthcoming Chase Arena in Mission Bay, which is already amassing a big collection of restaurant options . . . .

At this point, the only traces of Ballast’s Bay Area brewery exist in permit form. According to a recent ABC filing, the company has a pending beer manufacturer license application at the address. Furthermore, a recent building permit with the city of San Francisco shows work is being done to build a 6,300-square-foot restaurant at 705 16th St . . . .
https://www.sfchronicle.com/food/art...paign=sfc_beer
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  #2179  
Old Posted Aug 13, 2018, 6:59 AM
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looks like some sort of SF-themed mini-golf going up on MB Commons parcel in front of Diller Cancer building





Uber is getting more skin







slightly different angle for UCSF block 23



Three Corners



the arena site



Third St looking north



the northernmost block of Illinois is temporarily closed off

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  #2180  
Old Posted Aug 29, 2018, 5:26 PM
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Illinois St looking north toward arena



on the east side of the street at the corner with Terry Francois, a bulb-out is forming



and on the east side of that same corner, another is protruding into Terry Francois



continuing to move toward the water, the sidewalks on the east side of Terry Francois are progressing, and one section is open









Uber and the adjacent arena office building, seen from UCSF



more Uber skin





Three Corners



seems they've wrapped up at least some of the underground work on the south side of UCSF parcel 23, since the road (Campus Wy?) has been paved



how new block 6E meets the sidewalk. I had hoped for a little greenery in those indents, ah well



and the west side of block 6E, the mid-block passage. (block 6W is due to start construction next year, IIRC)

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