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  #10101  
Old Posted Dec 24, 2021, 2:41 AM
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I don’t see Arq in your list over on La Cienega. It’s 31 floors so should make the list. The other two Warmer Center buildings also look to be over 300ft. 11770 is also 34 floors but is fairly new so may not show up. It’s the tallest in the Barrington Plaza area. Sorry I’m too lazy to do any more research.
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  #10102  
Old Posted Dec 24, 2021, 2:55 AM
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Originally Posted by plinko View Post
I don’t see Arq in your list over on La Cienega. It’s 31 floors so should make the list. The other two Warmer Center buildings also look to be over 300ft. 11770 is also 34 floors but is fairly new so may not show up. It’s the tallest in the Barrington Plaza area. Sorry I’m too lazy to do any more research.
Awesome!

Emporis lists the other Warner Center towers under 300', but they have an entry for Arq, so that's good to go. Is it within Culver City limits? I don't know what neighborhood to assign it.

As for West LA/Brentwood, I used to be able to see the cluster of buildings in and around Barrington Plaza from my kitchen window--I'd love to add the new tower, Landmark II. I found a CTBUH 'interim' page for it, and that's good enough for me.
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  #10103  
Old Posted Dec 24, 2021, 3:07 AM
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571 ft. 44 floors, Century Plaza Tower I, Ofc., Century City (Los Angeles)
571 ft. 44 floors, Century Plaza Tower II, Ofc., Century City (Los Angeles)
537 ft. 46 floors, Century Plaza North Tower, Res., Century City (Los Angeles)
537 ft. 46 floors, Century Plaza South Tower, Res., Century City (Los Angeles)
533 ft. 39 floors, SunAmerica Center, Ofc., Century City (Los Angeles)
506 ft. 36 floors, 10 Universal City Plaza, Ofc., Universal City (Los Angeles)
492 ft. 34 floors, Fox Plaza, Ofc., Century City (Los Angeles)
491 ft. 35 floors, MGM Tower, Ofc., Century City (Los Angeles)
483 ft. 40 floors, 10000 Santa Monica, Res., Century City (Los Angeles)
478 ft. 41 floors, The Century, Res., Century City (Los Angeles)
460 ft. 36 floors, The Tower, Ofc., Burbank
454 ft. 34 floors, Equitable Life Bldg., Ofc., Koreatown (Los Angeles)
433 ft. 32 floors, 5900 Wilshire, Ofc., Miracle Mile (Los Angeles)
427 ft. 29 floors, The Gayley at Wilshire, Res., Westwood (Los Angeles)
417 ft. 35 floors, Shoreline Gateway, Res., Long Beach
413 ft. 25 floors, Warner Center III, Ofc., Woodland Hills (Los Angeles)
398 ft. 28 floors, 1900 Avenue of the Stars, Ofc., Century City (Los Angeles)
397 ft. 30 floors, One World Trade Center, Ofc., Long Beach
395 ft. 32 floors, Sierra Towers, Res., West Hollywood
364 ft. 26 floors, 10100 Santa Monica, Ofc., Century City (Los Angeles)
363 ft. 28 floors, California Federal Savings & Loan Building, Ofc., Miracle Mile (Los Angeles)
363 ft. 28 floors, Blair House, Res., Westwood (Los Angeles)
363 ft. 21 floors, Center West, Ofc., Westwood (Los Angeles)
363 ft. 31 floors, The Evian, Res., Westwood (Los Angeles)
363 ft. 24 floors, Oppenheimer Tower, Ofc., Westwood (Los Angeles)
360 ft. 24 floors, 222 North Sepulveda, Ofc., El Segundo
354 ft. 28 floors, Hilton Universal City & Towers, Hotel, Universal City (Los Angeles)
353 ft. 25 floors, Glendale Plaza, Ofc., Glendale
349 ft. 34 floors, Landmark II, Res., West Los Angeles (Los Angeles)
348 ft. 23 floors, Watt Plaza North Tower, Ofc., Century City (Los Angeles)
348 ft. 23 floors, Watt Plaza South Tower, Ofc., Century City (Los Angeles)
347 ft. 24 floors, 10960 Wilshire, Ofcl, Westwood (Los Angeles)
345 ft. 21 floors, West Ocean Condominiums I, Res., Long Beach
334 ft. 24 floors, Wilshire Landmark I, Ofc, West Los Angeles (Los Angeles)
328 ft. 21 floors, Eighteen Eighty Eight Building, Ofc., Century City (Los Angeles)
328 ft. 22 floors, The Lexington, Ofc., Glendale
328 ft. 27 floors, The Wilshire, Res., Westwood (Los Angeles)
327 ft. 23 floors, The Tower, Ofc., Westwood (Los Angeles)
323 ft. 21 floors, 200 Spectrum Center, Ofc., Irvine
323 ft. 21 floors, 400 Spectrum Center, Ofc., Irvine
320 ft. 31 floors, ARQ, Res., West Adams (Los Angeles)
315 ft. 20 floors, 520 Newport Center Drive, Ofc., Newport Beach
314 ft. 20 floors, 6500 Wilshire, Ofc., Miracle Mile (Los Angeles)
312 ft. 24 floors, Landmark Square, Ofc., Long Beach
312 ft. 22 floors, Mercury, Res., Koreatown (Los Angeles)
309 ft. 21 floors, Valley Executive Tower, Ofc., Sherman Oaks (Los Angeles)
307 ft. 28 floors, 2222 Avenue of the Stars, Res., Century City (Los Angeles)
307 ft. 21 floors, 6300 Wilshire, Ofc., Miracle Mile (Los Angeles)
307 ft. 29 floors, The Vermont I, Res., Koreatown (Los Angeles)
305 ft. 28 floors, 2220 Avenue of the Stars, Res., Century City (Los Angeles)
305 ft. 21 floors, Century Park Plaza, Ofc., Century City (Los Angeles)
305 ft. 20 floors, Sunset Vine Tower, Hollywood (Los Angeles)
303 ft. 24 floors, Wilshire and Barrington Condominiums, Res., West Los Angeles (Los Angeles)
302 ft. 20 floors, Galaxy Towers, Res., Long Beach
300 ft. 20 floors, 100 North Sepulveda, Ofc., El Segundo
300 ft. 20 floors, 200 North Sepulveda, Ofc., El Segundo
300 ft. 21 floors, 1000 Wilshire, Ofc., Santa Monica
300 ft. 25 floors, Barrington Plaza A, Res., West Los Angeles (Los Angeles)
300 ft. 21 floors, Nestle Building, Ofc., Glendale
300 ft. 24 floors, World Savings Center, Ofc., West Los Angeles (Los Angeles)
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  #10104  
Old Posted Dec 26, 2021, 8:19 AM
CaliNative CaliNative is offline
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San Pedro

It seems to me that San Pedro would be an ideal location for residential and office towers. Busy port, affluent areas to the west on the Palos Verdes penninsula, etc. Curious that San Pedro hasn't developed like nearby Long Beach has. Maybe the fact that LB is a bit removed from the port area helped development, but more important perhaps is that LB was (is) an independent city, whereas SP is part of distant Los Angeles, connected by a long narrow shoestring means it gets forgotten. It doesn't even have a light rail line connecting it to the rest of the urban area. San Pedro could be L.A.'s cosmopolitan Valparaiso. Attractive location with the tall hills behind the city and the port and ocean. Prevailing westerly winds carry most of the port and refinery pollution away from the city, towards the east. Large Italian American population (45,000 out of 85,000 total), and also substantial Croatian, Portuguese, Greek, Irish, Norwegian, Asian, and Mexican presense. If I were a billionaire I'd be buying up properties in San Pedro. The place has potential.

Last edited by CaliNative; Dec 27, 2021 at 12:34 AM.
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  #10105  
Old Posted Dec 26, 2021, 7:11 PM
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Craigs, thank you for the fine list. It points up the fact that the SkyscraperPage Database for Los Angeles has a hole that you no doubt noticed: The actual Page 2 buildings 101-200 are missing from the Database. It ends at 1900 Avenue of the Stars (28 floors / 398') and picks up again with Beverly West Residences (21 floors / 295') -- a 103-foot gap! I posted a request to have the editors fix this; I hope they can correct it soon.
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  #10106  
Old Posted Dec 26, 2021, 7:29 PM
JerellO JerellO is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CaliNative View Post
It seems to me that San Pedro would be an ideal location for residential and office towers. Busy port, affluent areas to the west on the Palos Verdes penninsula, etc. Curious that San Pedro hasn't developed much like nearby Long Beach. Maybe the fact that it is just a tiny part of L.A. connected by a long narrow shoestring means it gets forgotten. It doesn't even have a light rail line connecting it to the rest of the urban area. San Pedro could be L.A.'s cosmopolitan Valparaiso. Attractive location with the tall hills behind the city and the port and ocean. Prevailing westerly winds carry most of the port and refinery pollution away from the city, towards the east. Large Italian American population (45,000 out of 85,000 total), and also substantial Croatian, Portuguese, Greek, Irish, Norwegian, Asian, and Mexican presense. If I were a billionaire I'd be buying up properties in San Pedro. The place has potential.
Long Beach kind of feels like San Diego, surprised it didn’t develop early on.. same with San Pedro
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  #10107  
Old Posted Dec 26, 2021, 10:20 PM
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Originally Posted by JerellO View Post
Long Beach kind of feels like San Diego, surprised it didn’t develop early on.. same with San Pedro
Long Beach did develop early on, as the following photos show. It was definitely one of the more built up areas in the Southland in the first decades of the 20th century. However, Long Beach suffered a major earthquake in 1933, so a lot of the city's oldest buildings were either destroyed or had to be pulled down because they were so badly damaged. Also, Long Beach's downtown and waterfront were extensively redeveloped over the decades and a lot of the older structures were replaced with newer buildings. That said, there are still some really great historic buildings left, both downtown and in the neighborhoods.

1920s

source

1920s

source


source

The Pike rollercoaster and downtown Long Beach with the oil derricks of Signal Hill in the backdrop, circa 1940:

source

1946:

source

And I can't fail to post a pic that includes both the Breakers Hotel (on the right) as well as the Villa Riviera residences (far down Ocean Boulevard in this pic), the latter being the best 1920s tower still standing in Long Beach:

source

According to Wikipedia, at 277 ft. tall and 16 floors, Villa Riviera was the second-tallest building in Southern California from 1929 until the mid-1950s:

source

As for San Pedro, I've only passed through a couple times on my way from Palos Verdes to Long Beach, but it seems to have its own downtown area and there's a waterfront park as well.
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  #10108  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2021, 6:56 AM
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Originally Posted by craigs View Post
Long Beach did develop early on, as the following photos show. It was definitely one of the more built up areas in the Southland in the first decades of the 20th century. However, Long Beach suffered a major earthquake in 1933, so a lot of the city's oldest buildings were either destroyed or had to be pulled down because they were so badly damaged. Also, Long Beach's downtown and waterfront were extensively redeveloped over the decades and a lot of the older structures were replaced with newer buildings. That said, there are still some really great historic buildings left, both downtown and in the neighborhoods.

1920s

source

1920s

source


source

The Pike rollercoaster and downtown Long Beach with the oil derricks of Signal Hill in the backdrop, circa 1940:

source

1946:

source

And I can't fail to post a pic that includes both the Breakers Hotel (on the right) as well as the Villa Riviera residences (far down Ocean Boulevard in this pic), the latter being the best 1920s tower still standing in Long Beach:

source

According to Wikipedia, at 277 ft. tall and 16 floors, Villa Riviera was the second-tallest building in Southern California from 1929 until the mid-1950s:

source

As for San Pedro, I've only passed through a couple times on my way from Palos Verdes to Long Beach, but it seems to have its own downtown area and there's a waterfront park as well.
Wow very cool! I like that semicircular road into the water
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  #10109  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2021, 8:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by craigs View Post
Long Beach did develop early on, as the following photos show. It was definitely one of the more built up areas in the Southland in the first decades of the 20th century. However, Long Beach suffered a major earthquake in 1933, so a lot of the city's oldest buildings were either destroyed or had to be pulled down because they were so badly damaged. Also, Long Beach's downtown and waterfront were extensively redeveloped over the decades and a lot of the older structures were replaced with newer buildings. That said, there are still some really great historic buildings left, both downtown and in the neighborhoods.

1920s

source

1920s

source


source

The Pike rollercoaster and downtown Long Beach with the oil derricks of Signal Hill in the backdrop, circa 1940:

source

1946:

source

And I can't fail to post a pic that includes both the Breakers Hotel (on the right) as well as the Villa Riviera residences (far down Ocean Boulevard in this pic), the latter being the best 1920s tower still standing in Long Beach:

source

According to Wikipedia, at 277 ft. tall and 16 floors, Villa Riviera was the second-tallest building in Southern California from 1929 until the mid-1950s:

source

As for San Pedro, I've only passed through a couple times on my way from Palos Verdes to Long Beach, but it seems to have its own downtown area and there's a waterfront park as well.
-------
Here is a good video/slideshow from YouTube on the 1920s buildings of Long Beach, also posted on my 1920s thread on "Found City Photos":

Video Link


The famous Villa Riviera is discussed starting right before minute 9; cool pictures of the "fierce" gargoyles at the top.

San Pedro has nothing to rival these 1920s masterpieces. It has a standard 1920s era municipal building and a couple of others, one for port administration. Great potential there. Hopefully it will be realized.

Last edited by CaliNative; Dec 27, 2021 at 9:11 AM.
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  #10110  
Old Posted Dec 27, 2021, 9:45 AM
BaldwinDPB BaldwinDPB is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JerellO View Post
Wow very cool! I like that semicircular road into the water
When I googled this building, the Villa Riviera, I found an article stating that this building as originally 447 feet tall. Either it must be a misprint, or this building was either built firmly into the side of the beach cliff that it has floors (foundation) that go well under the ground that we just can't see. Anyway, your 277 feet sounds a lot more accurate for this building. Earlier photo shots of Long Beach show that the beach cliff was once much closer inland to Ocean Blvd.
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  #10111  
Old Posted Dec 28, 2021, 1:34 AM
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Originally Posted by BaldwinDPB View Post
When I googled this building, the Villa Riviera, I found an article stating that this building as originally 447 feet tall. Either it must be a misprint, or this building was either built firmly into the side of the beach cliff that it has floors (foundation) that go well under the ground that we just can't see. Anyway, your 277 feet sounds a lot more accurate for this building. Earlier photo shots of Long Beach show that the beach cliff was once much closer inland to Ocean Blvd.
Villa Riviera could not have ever been 447 ft. tall, even if we chose to measure its height from the (previous) beachfront façade. And organizations that measure tower heights do so from the upper side of any slope in any case.

Compare Villa Riviera's 277 ft. peak with the new residential tower just built across Ocean Boulevard, the Shoreline Gateway East Tower, which is 417 ft. tall. Not even close:


source
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  #10112  
Old Posted Dec 31, 2021, 12:30 AM
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While we are on Long Beach...

Onni's project is coming along nicely. Should be topped out soon. They value engineered the ish outta this one



Not sure what this one on Ocean Ave is but it's topped out



And in the opposite side of construction is De-construction... and that's what's happening with the old Long Beach City Hall building. It's coming down.

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  #10113  
Old Posted Dec 31, 2021, 2:19 AM
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Does anyone know how tall will the Onni project be, and what will become of the old city hall property?
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  #10114  
Old Posted Dec 31, 2021, 7:31 AM
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Originally Posted by hughfb3 View Post

Not sure what this one on Ocean Ave is but it's topped out

Are you sure this is a new building? It looks like the former GTE/Verizon office building and now being renovated. I used to live in Long Beach and briefly worked in the Verizon office. I could be wrong as a lot has changed down there in the 8 years since I moved.




Quote:
And in the opposite side of construction is De-construction... and that's what's happening with the old Long Beach City Hall building. It's coming down.

For some strange reason I always felt like the former Long Beach City Hall had a kinship with the Boston City Hall. More so the Plaza surrounding the building.
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  #10115  
Old Posted Jan 1, 2022, 6:24 AM
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Originally Posted by hughfb3 View Post
While we are on Long Beach...

Onni's project is coming along nicely. Should be topped out soon. They value engineered the ish outta this one



Not sure what this one on Ocean Ave is but it's topped out



And in the opposite side of construction is De-construction... and that's what's happening with the old Long Beach City Hall building. It's coming down.

Is this kind of demolition on Long Beach City Hall the same way they took down the 31 story St Regis Hotel Tower in Century City? are there any pictures of that one?
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  #10116  
Old Posted Jan 3, 2022, 8:39 AM
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Love the old Long Beach photos.
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  #10117  
Old Posted Jan 3, 2022, 8:41 AM
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Century City



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  #10118  
Old Posted Jan 3, 2022, 12:16 PM
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Nice Pictures! According to list above, the new Century plaza twin towers are 537" and the Sun America building in 533". I don't think so!!
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  #10119  
Old Posted Jan 3, 2022, 1:43 PM
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Century City is so weirdly unique. It's skyline rivals that of a lot of major US cities.
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  #10120  
Old Posted Jan 3, 2022, 7:01 PM
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Nice pics, pwright! The temple sure has a great vantage of the Westside.

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Originally Posted by LAnative61 View Post
Nice Pictures! According to list above, the new Century plaza twin towers are 537" and the Sun America building in 533". I don't think so!!
I agree that it seems they are taller than the 'official' height given. I wish we could get some sort of official audit, but there's really no such thing.
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