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  #23001  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2021, 12:13 AM
janbe74 janbe74 is offline
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Those figures needs updating. 9,775,267 doses administered.
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  #23002  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2021, 12:24 AM
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Yeah that 19% figure is from April 10. We are doing something around .75% of the population everyday.
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  #23003  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2021, 12:38 AM
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Originally Posted by Architype View Post
In theory, healthcare costs should go down with increased efficiency brought about by new scientific discoveries, treatments, and more advanced technology.
According to what theory? Health care costs have only grown with time - what major cost cutting breakthrough are we waiting for?
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  #23004  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2021, 1:57 AM
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Originally Posted by MonctonRad View Post
Health care in fact needs new investment, especially in terms of long term care to decrease the number of bed blockers in acute care hospitals.

The government though doesn't want to hear that...........
This is the real low hanging fruit. Low acuity long term beds should be easier and cheaper to operate. We just saw LTC is a bit of a disaster in this country, but maybe some better quality publicly run LTC facilities can help avoid a repeat of what we saw in COVID, and offload from extremely expensive hospital beds.
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  #23005  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2021, 2:01 AM
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Originally Posted by theman23 View Post
According to what theory? Health care costs have only grown with time - what major cost cutting breakthrough are we waiting for?
Yeah we don't generally find cheaper ways to deal with things. We find new and better treatment options, but they are always more expensive, including new equipment.
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  #23006  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2021, 2:07 AM
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Yeah we don't generally find cheaper ways to deal with things. We find new and better treatment options, but they are always more expensive, including new equipment.
Yup. If there is a noteworthy improvement (technological or otherwise), it becomes standard of care. Older technologies or treatments don’t become cheaper, they became outdated and are abandoned. There is no tolerance from patients in Western societies for substandard treatment.
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  #23007  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2021, 2:11 AM
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I do wonder what the answer is going forward with health care. Several European countries (France comes to mind) have private options that remove some burden on the public system. There are about a dozen European countries with a better health care system than Canada.

We certainly need to be putting more money into health care. I just wonder if there's another way to find funding besides just a general income tax increase.
The private option would eventually lead to a two tiered system. Where the rich get their top class version of health care. And everyone else is stuck with a shitty version of health care.
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  #23008  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2021, 2:37 AM
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I won't mind a two tier system if is hastens the eventual wiping clean of society of those who oppress the masses.



Plot twist: Those who do the wiping become the oppressors of the masses.
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  #23009  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2021, 3:10 AM
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Originally Posted by theman23 View Post
According to what theory? Health care costs have only grown with time - what major cost cutting breakthrough are we waiting for?
My theory, it's that one day we will attain Star Trek level medicine, trending away from labour intensive health care to efficiently run technologically based healthcare.
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  #23010  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2021, 4:24 AM
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Originally Posted by MonctonRad View Post
It pisses me off that every few years, governments come up with new plans to find "efficiencies" in the health care system to save money.

Usually this entails further consolidation in management, creating larger regional health care authorities, and increasingly multilayered managerial systems where the people with the real decision making powers are becoming further and further detached from the front lines, and thus less able to see the real world implications of their managerial decisions.

The truth is that health care management in this country is impossibly stultified and ossified, detached from reality, and unresponsive the the real time needs of the front line workers.

Front line workers increasingly feel like cogs in a wheel, with no real decision making power on their own, responding to edicts by administrators in distant cities with no real idea of what they are doing.

Add this disillusionment on top of burn out from working years in a stressful environment, with irregular hours and frequent on call responsibilities, and you get into a really problematic situation.

I'm 63, and I'm pretty fed up. I have decided that there is no way I am going to continue doing round the clock call beyond the end of next year. If this means full retirement, then so be it. I'm not alone. Probably 30% of physicians are within five years of retirement. It wouldn't take too much to make many of us think about an earlier retirement option. Sure, this might mean a more spartan retirement than many of us would have liked, but if you're burned out, well, sometimes you have to do things for your own personal well being...........
I feel that someone your age should not be on call during those late night or early morning hours. You've done enough of that. I'm 19 years younger than you and while I could do it now I probably wouldn't want to in another 5-10 years.

I agree with your views about efficiencies. It has been tried in Ontario and wasn't good for front line workers. And it's not just one political party that has tried it here.
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  #23011  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2021, 4:43 AM
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Originally Posted by OldDartmouthMark View Post
I was not referring to NS hospitals, actually, since our covid situation has been amazingly good compared to the rest of the country. I was referring to healthcare workers in the harder hit provinces, like Ontario, Quebec, Alberta, etc. While the talking heads continually refer to data, like number of ICU beds taken up, and capacity, etc., nobody seems to realize that healthcare workers are going full tilt 24/7 trying to handle all the worst case covid patients that are filling up their wards. These people require constant care and are always at risk of taking a turn for the worse, and dying. On top of that there's the mental stress load of knowing you are working around a high concentration of live virus, and thus have to take extraordinary measures to protect yourself from getting sick, and potentially bringing it home to your family. I've heard stories of healthcare workers renting an RV and parking it in their driveway so that they can live apart from their families to reduce risk of transmission. That kind of stressful, thankless work/life situation will take its toll on people in the long run, and will result in burnout.

I agree with your comment on diverting vaccine from NS to ON. It would be a drop in the bucket, and would not solve their bottleneck problem of stockpiling huge numbers of doses because they can't get them into arms quickly enough. Meanwhile, the maritimes are just one infected traveller getting out into the community away from an outbreak.
Many health care workers have been isolating. There is a hotel in the neighbourhood that I live in that has gotten a lot of business from hospital workers who are staying there to prevent spread to their family and others. Now with vaccinations it shouldn't be so much of a worry.

I noticed that many police officers and Hydro One workers have been isolating recently at that hotel.

Even though our regional hospital in Timmins isn't overwhelmed as far as I know, it isn't exactly going to be easy because we have outbreaks happening in our city and region right now.
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  #23012  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2021, 5:25 AM
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So the Ontario government is officially backtracking on playground closures...they may backtrack on police checks for anyone outside their household.

This kind of flip flop political business is getting a little frustrating.
The media really attacked the Ford government and I'm glad it happened.

Closing playgrounds was just ridiculous. Now I realize that some playgrounds in very populated areas can get quite crowded, most playgrounds don't have many children on them at the same time. My child is really happy now that they aren't on the banned list. We will go to them and I will make sure that my child stays apart from others.

As for police checks, almost all police forces in Ontario have officially stated that they will NOT do random checks on people in their vehicles or walking. And many of them stated that they don't want flak from the public and that the random check are unconstitutional.

Most Ontarians have lost trust in Doug Ford whether they supported him or not and either he will have to resign or backtrack on more things and admit that he messed up on this third wave. Trudeau might save his butt if more vaccine doses come in than what was expected.
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  #23013  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2021, 7:52 AM
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Ford has dropped the police state idea after many police forces announced they'd refuse to use the new power and the CCLA announced a constitutional challenge.
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  #23014  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2021, 8:51 AM
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The pandemic has oddly tempered my gut negative reaction to local people who fall for misinformation.

I keep seeing some version of this ad:



On talk radio here, every week there are a few callers with concerns, especially since the AZ situation. I’d say in total over the past year, surely at least two dozen individual callers with some level of vaccine hesitancy. I can only recall a couple who didn’t immediately change their minds and thank the host when reality was explained to them - and those were very far gone QAnon types actively organizing protests. Everyone else said something along the lines of, “Well thanks, Paddy, it’s hard to know what’s true online”, or “So glad I called thanks for that Paddy!” Etc.

My gut reaction isn’t to immediately write them off as hopeless anymore and that’s very new to me at least.
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  #23015  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2021, 9:18 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Architype View Post
My theory, it's that one day we will attain Star Trek level medicine, trending away from labour intensive health care to efficiently run technologically based healthcare.
The general trend has been that new expensive procedures (MRI for example) more than compensate for any savings from treatment.
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  #23016  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2021, 11:57 AM
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Originally Posted by theman23 View Post
Yup. If there is a noteworthy improvement (technological or otherwise), it becomes standard of care. Older technologies or treatments don’t become cheaper, they became outdated and are abandoned. There is no tolerance from patients in Western societies for substandard treatment.
I'm not a medical expert, but that doesn't seem right to me. Often times advancements in care are also cheaper. How many surgical interventions are now outpatient procedures with better outcomes for patients and far less cost to the medical system?
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  #23017  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2021, 1:22 PM
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Originally Posted by Loco101 View Post
I feel that someone your age should not be on call during those late night or early morning hours. You've done enough of that. I'm 19 years younger than you and while I could do it now I probably wouldn't want to in another 5-10 years.
Thanks for your concern, but on call responsibilities are almost always a condition of being granted hospital privileges.

In a large teaching hospitals with resident staff, these responsibilities are usually downloaded to the residents, and the attending staff is able to sleep well. Most hospitals in the country however are non-teaching institutions, therefore the attendings are responsible for call.

How to provide these mandatory call responsibilities is determined by the individual departments. I am in a relatively large department of 13 individuals (dividing call responsibilities between diagnostic and interventional sections). I am on call roughly one in nine, which isn't too bad, and my section is large enough that senior members beyond the age of 65 are usually allowed to go off call. I say usually because this depends on the age distribution within the department. If five of the nine members wanted to go off call at the same time, this would present an unusual hardship to the remaining four younger members.

If you are in a smaller department, in a smaller hospital, with only 2-3 members, then on call responsibilities can become very tedious. Sometimes you can't escape call responsibilities no matter how old you are.
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  #23018  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2021, 2:10 PM
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Ontarios 7 day case count average dropped for the first time today since the start of the third wave - hopefully a sign of a peak? We need a few more days of data to know for sure though.
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  #23019  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2021, 3:09 PM
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Quebec reports 1344 new cases with 9 deaths

Montreal 336
Quebec City 184
Montérégie 161
Outaouais 143
Chaudière-Appalaches 139


683 in hospital (-9)
175 in ICU (-)

58 945 doses of vaccine administered in the last 24 hours for a total of 2 358 757
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  #23020  
Old Posted Apr 18, 2021, 3:27 PM
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Ontarios 7 day case count average dropped for the first time today since the start of the third wave - hopefully a sign of a peak? We need a few more days of data to know for sure though.
What have positivity rate trends been like? I haven’t been able to find any data other than the positivity rate for today’s update.

BC’s 7-day rolling average of new cases has been mostly flat for the past week, and the positivity rate has been trending downwards over that time. It’s still high, around 9.6% but that’s down from 10.6% a week ago. And it’s trending down in all health regions.
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