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  #381  
Old Posted Jan 12, 2016, 7:12 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is offline
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Originally Posted by Hali87 View Post
Interesting photos! I like the old-school signage - everything's very big but also "personalized" - wish we had more of that remaining.
I agree. I think the mid-20th century was the high point for business signage. There were many smaller companies who would build one-off signs for businesses, and a lot of shop owners would go for them to help draw people in.

I can recall in my younger days being disappointed when all the cool, unique and creative signage started to be replaced with those cheap, rectangular backlit signs with just a printed name or logo on the sign. The old signage was almost always uniquely shaped and had some kind of interesting lighting, either neon or a series of lightbulbs - often there was some kind of animation involved as well, such as a physically rotating part or some kind of light effect.

I'm optimistic that the current trend towards LED technology being adapted to signs (faux neon, etc.) might bring a resurgence of style back to signage.
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  #382  
Old Posted Jan 12, 2016, 7:14 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is offline
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Originally Posted by Keith P. View Post
Yesterday or today the Chronicle-Herald archive posted a number of pics on their Facebook page. They typically post very little so I don't know what prompted this - perhaps trying to sabotage some revenue opportunities for management given the C-H labor situation. In any event, we are the beneficiary. Most of these are from the '40s through the '60s.
Keith, thanks for taking the time to share those photos for us. They are most interesting and enjoyable to view.

Did you notice if they had any larger, higher resolution photos posted? It would be cool be able to see more detail in some of the shots.
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  #383  
Old Posted Jan 12, 2016, 8:45 PM
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Originally Posted by OldDartmouthMark View Post
Keith, thanks for taking the time to share those photos for us. They are most interesting and enjoyable to view.

Did you notice if they had any larger, higher resolution photos posted? It would be cool be able to see more detail in some of the shots.
I don't think so, but I'm not an expert on Facebook. Here is their page if you want to poke around:

https://www.facebook.com/thechronicl...hives/?fref=ts
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  #384  
Old Posted Jan 12, 2016, 9:35 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is offline
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I don't think so, but I'm not an expert on Facebook. Here is their page if you want to poke around:

https://www.facebook.com/thechronicl...hives/?fref=ts
Thanks Keith, while somewhat of a luddite when it comes to Facebook, I'll give it a look just the same.
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  #385  
Old Posted Jan 12, 2016, 10:07 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is offline
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From the Saint Mary's University archives:

Saint Mary's Cathedral Basilica and Glebe House



http://library2.smu.ca/handle/01/20331#.VpVy11LhJJl

Quote:
Date Created: ca. 1870
Corner of Barrington Street and Spring Garden Road, showing the Basilica on Spring Garden being renovated in a neo-Gothic style, the wooden Glebe House on the corner, another house much further along Barrington Street, and (to the left) a corner of the St. Paul's cemetery (with black railing). The granite spire (tallest in North America) has not yet been built, and the three arched front windows have not yet been decorated or glazed. Four boys are standing by the cemetery wall with its black railing. Both streets are dirt or partly covered in packed snow.

Last edited by OldDartmouthMark; Jan 13, 2016 at 5:32 PM. Reason: Added date of photo
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  #386  
Old Posted Jan 13, 2016, 7:10 PM
Nor'easter Nor'easter is offline
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Saw an interesting plan of Halifax from the 1750's at a link posted by Mark in another thread and just had to overlay it on google maps, thought I'd share. Fits pretty darn well west of Argyle.

http://www.fineart.utoronto.ca/canar...ifaxplans.html
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  #387  
Old Posted Jan 13, 2016, 11:52 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is offline
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Wow! That's really cool! Looks like they adhered to the plan for the most part.

You have to wonder if the city founders ever imagined that the grid they were setting out at the time would still be in place some 267 years after the fact. Talk about leaving your mark on the world...

Thanks for posting that! It really drives home the historical significance of the downtown core.
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  #388  
Old Posted Jan 15, 2016, 10:37 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is offline
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Here's a pic of the Halifax City Police on the steps of the Grand Parade in 1914.

Not too many of the structures in the background still exist.



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halifax_Regional_Police
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  #389  
Old Posted Jan 16, 2016, 5:59 AM
fenwick16 fenwick16 is offline
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Great find DartmouthMark. I like the police hats and motorcycles.

Would the motorcycles be Indian brand? I don't know anything about motorcycles but I watch American Pickers quite often and the two characters (Mike and Frank) get very excited whenever they see old Indian motorcycles.

Last edited by fenwick16; Jan 16, 2016 at 6:17 AM.
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  #390  
Old Posted Jan 16, 2016, 8:17 PM
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I think Indian was the most prevalent brand of motorcycle back then and these look like they might be those, though it is hard to tell for sure and I am no expert. Harley-Davidson, Henderson, and Campion were also making motorcycles back then, probably others too.

The building on the immediate left still stands as the home of the Five Fishermen restaurant, and of course the town clock remains as well.
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  #391  
Old Posted Jan 17, 2016, 5:05 AM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is offline
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I'm not well-versed on motorcycles of that vintage, but from the pics I've seen of Indian motorcycles it appears that they had fuel tanks with curved sides rather than the flat ones on these bikes. Harley Davidsons had flat sided tanks, so they would be a likely candidate but the pics I've seen had different front forks with lever-type suspension. I cant make out the logo on the tank, but it doesn't look like either brand from the vintage - but it could even be a police logo put on at the time. Both brands did offer V-twin engines, so that's not conclusive either.

One cool thing of note is the hand-operated stick shift on the left side of the bike, meaning the rider had to take their hand of the handlebar to shift gears. I remember some of the old Dartmouth Police bikes had a similar shifter configuration many years ago.
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  #392  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2016, 7:35 PM
JET JET is offline
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Originally Posted by OldDartmouthMark View Post
I'm not well-versed on motorcycles of that vintage, but from the pics I've seen of Indian motorcycles it appears that they had fuel tanks with curved sides rather than the flat ones on these bikes. Harley Davidsons had flat sided tanks, so they would be a likely candidate but the pics I've seen had different front forks with lever-type suspension. I cant make out the logo on the tank, but it doesn't look like either brand from the vintage - but it could even be a police logo put on at the time. Both brands did offer V-twin engines, so that's not conclusive either.

One cool thing of note is the hand-operated stick shift on the left side of the bike, meaning the rider had to take their hand of the handlebar to shift gears. I remember some of the old Dartmouth Police bikes had a similar shifter configuration many years ago.
I think that it might be a Sears motobike, the shape of the gastank and detailing on the tank are a good match:
http://auto.howstuffworks.com/1914-sears-deluxe.htm

Sears motorcycles might be Excelsior built: http://www.yesterdays.nl/excelsior-1...oe-p-1013.html
also known by Henderson-Excelsior: https://www.google.ca/search?q=Excel...2o5VaBfPuOM%3A

Last edited by JET; Jan 18, 2016 at 8:21 PM.
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  #393  
Old Posted Jan 19, 2016, 2:01 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is offline
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Originally Posted by JET View Post
I think that it might be a Sears motobike, the shape of the gastank and detailing on the tank are a good match:
http://auto.howstuffworks.com/1914-sears-deluxe.htm

Sears motorcycles might be Excelsior built: http://www.yesterdays.nl/excelsior-1...oe-p-1013.html
also known by Henderson-Excelsior: https://www.google.ca/search?q=Excel...2o5VaBfPuOM%3A
Interesting... you may have it. There are certainly a lot of similarities. Also there could be some differences due to police equipment as well. Excellent detective work!
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  #394  
Old Posted Feb 2, 2016, 11:26 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is offline
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Here's a neat pic of the Dennis Building before the additional floors were added on:



Source: http://www.dennisbuilding.ca/why-keep-it/
I found yet another photo/piece of the puzzle on the history of the Dennis Building a little while ago. This photo from the NS archives from January 12, 1912 shows the Dennis shortly after it was ravaged by fire, and it appears that there was just a shell remaining. I hadn't found it before as the archives labelled it as the Herald Building rather than the Dennis (though I knew they were one and the same), probably from Notman Studio's original notes.



Source:
https://novascotia.ca/archives/notma...ves.asp?ID=323

One thing I found interesting is that between the 1871 photo at the top and the 1912 photo, it had a fifth storey added to it. Looks mildly Romanesque to me, though admittedly I'm not an architecture expert. After the fire, it appears that the existing fifth storey was eliminated and the additional 3 storeys that exist today were added.



http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/nova-s...oped-1.3074575

This building has such an interesting history...

https://www.nationaltrustcanada.ca/i...ennis-building

I haven't heard much in the news about it lately, though with our current cheapskate idiotic provincial government I am a little worried...
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  #395  
Old Posted Feb 3, 2016, 12:56 AM
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It actually looked a lot better without the addition on the top.

That was a massive fire from the looks of it. Rather amazing they managed to rebuild it from a shell.
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  #396  
Old Posted Feb 3, 2016, 1:06 AM
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Yep. It's a great old building and its location next to Province House along George Street makes it a key part of the city's heritage. The building above it fronting onto Barrington was already lost, so the Dennis Building really should be preserved.

It seemed at once point like progress was being made: http://thechronicleherald.ca/metro/1...-remain-intact

Unfortunately the province tends to move at a glacial pace. This doesn't seem like a case where the building isn't viable, it seems like it's caught in a completely artificial bureaucratic limbo.

The slow development progress along the waterfront is similarly hard to defend when you look at how much investment is happening in the rest of the city. Development is conspicuously absent from provincially-controlled plots of land in the downtown core.
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  #397  
Old Posted Feb 3, 2016, 3:26 AM
Drybrain Drybrain is offline
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It seemed at once point like progress was being made: http://thechronicleherald.ca/metro/1...-remain-intact

Unfortunately the province tends to move at a glacial pace. This doesn't seem like a case where the building isn't viable, it seems like it's caught in a completely artificial bureaucratic limbo.
I think that's basically it. The government seemed to move away from the "it's gotta go" talk and we're discussing some private partnership (also what they're now saying about Bloomfield). But there seems to be zero urgency over it.

The slowness makes it LESS likely the building will be retained and restored, and it's inexcusable. Though it's equally inexcusable that no one at the city seems to be doing any work on behalf of this site, unless something is happening behind the scenes I'm not aware of.
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  #398  
Old Posted Feb 3, 2016, 5:36 AM
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The government seemed to move away from the "it's gotta go" talk and we're discussing some private partnership (also what they're now saying about Bloomfield). But there seems to be zero urgency over it.
I don't know what the root cause is but the municipal and provincial governments really do seem to move at a slow pace compared to any other city I've paid any attention to. What's odd is that the private sector on the other hand seems about as vibrant as anywhere else, though they seem to have to operate in spite of the local layers of government much of the time.

I'd blame the politicians but I don't think they're any worse in Halifax or NS than in other places. Halifax's current mayor looks wonderful compared to Rob Ford. I suspect the problem is entrenched and inflexible bureaucracies.
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  #399  
Old Posted Feb 3, 2016, 1:52 PM
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I don't know what the root cause is but the municipal and provincial governments really do seem to move at a slow pace compared to any other city I've paid any attention to. What's odd is that the private sector on the other hand seems about as vibrant as anywhere else, though they seem to have to operate in spite of the local layers of government much of the time.

I'd blame the politicians but I don't think they're any worse in Halifax or NS than in other places. Halifax's current mayor looks wonderful compared to Rob Ford. I suspect the problem is entrenched and inflexible bureaucracies.
HRM can move quickly when they want to, i.e. the mushrooming number of unnecessary bike lanes they have built. Since this is not their building they really do not have much interest in it.

The real problem is the provincial Department of Transportation & Infrastructure Renewal (DTIR) which is one of the most ineffective bureaucracies I have ever seen, based on long experience dealing with them. They have a unique combination of an engineer's arrogance and a bureaucrat's CYA tendency. As a result, little gets done and when something does get done it is usually uninspired and poorly designed/built.
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  #400  
Old Posted Feb 3, 2016, 3:36 PM
OldDartmouthMark OldDartmouthMark is offline
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It actually looked a lot better without the addition on the top.

That was a massive fire from the looks of it. Rather amazing they managed to rebuild it from a shell.
Yeah, aesthetically it was in its best iteration in its original form IMHO, but you have to admit it certainly has a presence in its current form. There just aren't too many stone buildings with that height in this area. Looking at the current photo, it certainly does give the impression of a building built on top of a building, though.

I would say in the context of a modern building, this type of devastation would surely lead to demolition. The glass and steel structural components would not stand up to intense heat the way that stone would. The glass would shatter and the steel would lose its strength through annealing and likely deform.

I'm thinking that back then materials such as stone were expensive but labour was relatively cheap (plus safety standards lower and environmental standards nonexistent, and therefore also cheap), so it would have been viable to keep the stone shell and rebuild it from the inside. Also, what better time to add a few floors, since they are already rebuilding and the roof no longer exists...
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