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  #5121  
Old Posted Sep 30, 2022, 4:56 PM
Justin7 Justin7 is offline
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FWIW, the addition was built in 1934. Seeing as it is a 4-story inferior version of the original, I think replacing it, along with the anti-urban auto courtyard, with a 36-story resi and and activated street-level would be a win.
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  #5122  
Old Posted Sep 30, 2022, 5:03 PM
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"3 Liberty Place" concepts by Thomas Koloski by Philly SkyGuy, on Flickr

"3 Liberty Place" concepts by Thomas Koloski by Philly SkyGuy, on Flickr

My conceptual design for "3 Liberty Place". It mixes the final designs of the towers, along with using Helmut Jahn's sketches when he was creating One Liberty and tweaking Two Liberty. I like the crown on this, and the spire on this design is One Liberty's original stubby spire. The site selected is the block to the south on the west side, which would require demolishing historical structures (ouch). But it's just a concept!
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  #5123  
Old Posted Sep 30, 2022, 5:04 PM
kool-ski kool-ski is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mcgrath618 View Post
Wack. At least the church and 640 N Broad remain.
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Originally Posted by PHL10 View Post
Me too. It says the SW part of the property is where the new construction will be sited. I'm assuming it's that mid-century annex located at 15th and Mt. Vernon that will be demo'd.
Mcgrath618, I'm like you. When I looked at that site on Google Maps & panned around, I surmised that's the only "low-rise non-historic building" Blumenfeld could be referring to.

Although there's other businesses that's located in that complex, it would make more sense to put a tower of that height and massing on that block. Allow the option for those businesses to either relocate or to be incorporated into the new tower, if there's a commercial included.

That's probably what Blumenfeld should've made clear in that he wants to keep the Lofts (renovating that and possibly the annex, which is 4/5 stories, at 15th & Mt Vernon) and the church intact on that block BUT across the Mt Vernon, he wants to build a tower
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  #5124  
Old Posted Sep 30, 2022, 5:26 PM
Justin7 Justin7 is offline
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^ Nothing at all to indicate this is across the street. That is not 640.
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  #5125  
Old Posted Sep 30, 2022, 8:40 PM
kool-ski kool-ski is offline
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^ Nothing at all to indicate this is across the street. That is not 640.
I know. That is what's confusing us. I apologize if I didn't make myself clear. If Eric Blumenfeld has plans to redevelop the properties the blocks bounded by Broad, 15th, Green and Wallace (with the exception of the 7 story renovated factory-turn-apartments on the SE corner of 15th/Mt. Vernon), he should've been more accurate and detailed in his presentation and noted that all of the properties involved have different addresses.

Last edited by kool-ski; Sep 30, 2022 at 8:53 PM. Reason: I needed to correct some inaccurate information
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  #5126  
Old Posted Oct 3, 2022, 4:08 PM
PHLtoNYC PHLtoNYC is online now
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An improvement, if actually realized.
But why must the top 6 floors be ugly and somewhat cheap? Surely area rents would could justify a nicer concept façade, unless the architect actually thinks that looks good.

I like the style of floors 7-8, I think that style for the overbuild would look nice against the original brick building.

Update: New Design Includes Rebuild of Old Facade at 7th & Chestnut

https://www.ocfrealty.com/naked-phil...t-7th-chestnut
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  #5127  
Old Posted Oct 3, 2022, 6:17 PM
jaysb jaysb is offline
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Originally Posted by PHLtoNYC View Post
An improvement, if actually realized.
But why must the top 6 floors be ugly and somewhat cheap? Surely area rents would could justify a nicer concept façade, unless the architect actually thinks that looks good.

I like the style of floors 7-8, I think that style for the overbuild would look nice against the original brick building.

Update: New Design Includes Rebuild of Old Facade at 7th & Chestnut

https://www.ocfrealty.com/naked-phil...t-7th-chestnut
I'm not an expert on overbuilds but that seems like a loooot of work for 'just' 7 or 8 additional floors.
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  #5128  
Old Posted Oct 3, 2022, 6:40 PM
TempleGuy1000 TempleGuy1000 is online now
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Philadelphia development firm looks to raise $1B to revitalize Black neighborhoods

Can anyone read beyond the paywall to see what it says?

Axios has an abbreviated version: Philly developer gets funds to kickstart plan to transform Tioga

Quote:
In all, TPP Capital hopes to develop 1,400 residential units, 172,000 square feet of retail space and 92,000 square feet of street improvements, the Philadelphia Business Journal reported.
Didn't know if the PBJ said where specifically.
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  #5129  
Old Posted Oct 3, 2022, 6:42 PM
skyhigh07 skyhigh07 is online now
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Originally Posted by jaysb View Post
I'm not an expert on overbuilds but that seems like a loooot of work for 'just' 7 or 8 additional floors.
Agreed. I’m fine with it. Usually overbuilds, particularly on designated buildings, tend to try to blend in as much as possible. Also, it looks like the materials they’ll be using, which include stone panels, are quality.
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  #5130  
Old Posted Oct 3, 2022, 7:39 PM
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Philadelphia development firm looks to raise $1B to revitalize Black neighborhoods

Can anyone read beyond the paywall to see what it says?

Axios has an abbreviated version: Philly developer gets funds to kickstart plan to transform Tioga



Didn't know if the PBJ said where specifically.

Looks like the Axios article is more of an update on the PBJ article from 2020. Here’s the text of the PBJ article:

“A Philadelphia real estate development firm is seeking to raise $1 billion over the next decade to help transform five Black neighborhoods across the country. Its first planned project: the Tioga neighborhood in North Philadelphia.
TPP Capital Management Group hopes to raise its first $300 million for investment in Tioga, with a focus on improving the health and wellbeing of neighborhood residents. In total, TPP Capital plans to develop 1,400 residential units, 172,000 square feet of retail space and 92,000 square feet of street improvements, including new sidewalks and landscaping.

The proposal also calls for 98,000-square-foot “preventative health tower” that would house 45,000 square feet of primary and specialty care office space, a center for culinary medicine and a community farmers market. TPP Capital plans to start construction on that project in the first quarter of 2021, said Anthony Miles, one of the firm’s principals.

TPP Capital aims to use investments in residential and commercial development to reduce health disparities in Black neighborhoods. Many of the group’s planned projects in Tioga would either directly expand access to medical care or add healthy food options to the neighborhood.

”Tioga is going to be the national model for how you integrate health into Black neighborhoods,” Miles said.

The company has not yet identified the other projects across the U.S., Miles said.
Founded in 2015, the group has secured $10 million and is circling back with investors who previously committed funds two years ago when the project wasn’t ready to launch, Miles said. TPP Capital needs $23 million to start construction this fall on 40 condo units, aimed at health care workers, and 48 senior housing units at 1708-10 Tioga St.

The group is looking in the Philadelphia region and nationwide for investments from high net worth individuals, foundations, endowments, corporations and social impact investors, among other sources. Miles said TPP has not identified what other cities it would like to take on projects.

Miles has worked in urban real estate development and construction for over 17 years. He was previously involved in apartment development in North Philadelphia’s Francisville neighborhood where he grew up.

Some potential tenants have signed letters of intent, Miles said, including Salus University committing to an optometry, speech therapy and audiology lab in the health tower. Peirce College, a private college focused on adult learners, signed a letter of intent to lease space for a satellite campus, he said. Two Black-owned businesses, a juice bar and bottling facility and an optical boutique and lab, have also expressed interest.

TPP Capital has said it has 26 zoning applications approved for the 44 parcels it has under control, Miles said. The group plans to apply for construction permits in the next two weeks for the 40 condo units before securing permits for the senior housing units.

TPP Capital’s target area for development is within one or two blocks of the Temple University Hospital on North Broad Street in Tioga.

Many community members don’t have access to primary care physicians and instead must go outside Tioga or to emergency rooms at the nearby hospital for medical needs, Miles said. The planned medical office space at North 17th and Westmoreland streets would prevent the need for residents to leave the neighborhood for specialty care.

TPP Capital’s $1 billion campaign comes as the Covid-19 pandemic highlights long-existing health disparities impacting Black communities in the U.S. In Tioga, 45% of residents have high blood pressure, 77% have high cholesterol and 43.3% are obese, according to TPP Capital.

“Tioga reflects a lot of neighborhoods in the country in that it is a food desert and medical desert,” Miles said. “Tioga was a blank canvas. It’s easier to integrate our model because it’s all vacant land. We can bring in all new buildings and nobody is getting displaced.”

Over the past five years, TPP Capital has worked to engage with residents and learn their needs. Plans for a senior housing development, farmers market and condos for middle-income service workers all came from the community, Miles said. Community members requested that 10% of TPP Capital’s real estate developments be affordable for people in the neighborhood. TPP Capital's plans go above that, with 15% affordable units.

TPP Capital’s social impact model also places an emphasis on healthy food and nutrition as an investment in Black health. Miles said the group moved up its timeline on building the farmers market because of the community’s need for fresh fruits and vegetables during the Covid-19 crisis.

There are also plans for a 32,000-square-foot hub with retail space for healthy food vendors, and a 16,000-square-foot indoor vertical farm.

In part to give community residents the opportunity to work on its construction projects, TPP Capital is slated to develop a 6,800-square-foot center for job training and showcasing smart technology innovation.”

This sounds like an incredible idea. I hope it comes to fruition. I’ve long believed that addressing crime begins by addressing the deep cycles of generational poverty that pervade areas outside of CC.
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  #5131  
Old Posted Oct 3, 2022, 7:52 PM
TempleGuy1000 TempleGuy1000 is online now
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Thank you Gatorade_Jim. 1708-1710 Tioga is two empty lots next to some fascinating architecture.

1700 is a nice classic art deco apartment building


Love this old annex looking thing next door


Also, a neat old duplex across the street that's seen better days, but maybe one day will be saved
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  #5132  
Old Posted Oct 4, 2022, 3:52 AM
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Lights off on top of Two Liberty Place by Philly SkyGuy, on Flickr
Two Liberty last night
One Liberty Place spire repaint by Philly SkyGuy, on Flickr
One Liberty this morning
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  #5133  
Old Posted Oct 4, 2022, 10:36 AM
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Originally Posted by Gatorade_Jim View Post
This sounds like an incredible idea. I hope it comes to fruition. I’ve long believed that addressing crime begins by addressing the deep cycles of generational poverty that pervade areas outside of CC.
You’re right. Making neighborhoods “better” by switching who lives in them is just rearranging furniture. Glad to see a project focused on investing in people and communities that have suffered from decades of divestment. And that will benefit everyone long term because we’ll be a safer and more productive city.
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  #5134  
Old Posted Oct 4, 2022, 2:13 PM
arkitect13 arkitect13 is online now
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Speaking on the subject of vacant lots. A few blocks away from tioga-nicetown area, whats with the swath of 8 or so city blocks completely vacant? Near the end of roosevelt boulevard? Theres only a church and decrepit streets. Its likes a dozen city blocks, and I've never been able to find any info on it. Anyone know why its all empty?
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  #5135  
Old Posted Oct 4, 2022, 2:20 PM
TempleGuy1000 TempleGuy1000 is online now
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Speaking on the subject of vacant lots. A few blocks away from tioga-nicetown area, whats with the swath of 8 or so city blocks completely vacant? Near the end of roosevelt boulevard? Theres only a church and decrepit streets. Its likes a dozen city blocks, and I've never been able to find any info on it. Anyone know why its all empty?
In the 1990s, the bottom part of Logan was completely razed. It's referred to now as the Logan Triangle because the empty blocks form a triangle.

https://www.google.com/maps/@40.0235...7i16384!8i8192
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  #5136  
Old Posted Oct 4, 2022, 2:30 PM
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summersm343 summersm343 is offline
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Yep. Logan Triangle. Here’s the reason:

https://blog.phillyhistory.org/index...ogan-triangle/

The city needs to just turn it into green space at this point and be done with it.
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  #5137  
Old Posted Oct 4, 2022, 6:27 PM
3rd&Brown 3rd&Brown is offline
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Originally Posted by justremember View Post
You’re right. Making neighborhoods “better” by switching who lives in them is just rearranging furniture. Glad to see a project focused on investing in people and communities that have suffered from decades of divestment. And that will benefit everyone long term because we’ll be a safer and more productive city.
This narrative is exhausting.

Do you know who's leaving Philadelphia at a faster rate (by choice) of any demographic group?

Black people. The middle class black population of Philadelphia is plummeting. They're moving to Atlanta (and the south in general), Delaware, and the suburbs. It has (almost) nothing to do with gentrification and nearly everything to do with a city that can't execute even basic services.

No one is "switching" anyone anywhere in Philadelphia.

There's room for all of us.
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  #5138  
Old Posted Oct 4, 2022, 6:44 PM
TempleGuy1000 TempleGuy1000 is online now
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This narrative is exhausting.

No one is "switching" anyone anywhere in Philadelphia.

There's room for all of us.
I think there is a lot more overlap between what you just said and what justremember wrote than you think. Maybe 'rearranging the furniture' isn't the perfect analogy, but there's no denying that while many parts of the city (particularly the dense parts) are gentrifying, there's also parts of the city and inner-ring suburbs, that from a high-level view, are declining and at best stagnate. You correctly point out people are bouncing from these areas. But this is absolutely not a new phenomenon, working class black and white philadelphians have been leaving for generations when the opportunity arises.

The thing that has changed over time is where people are leaving from. And in that regard, I can see the "rearranging the furniture" angle. However, I think everyone can agree that improving the Q-O-L of these areas, investing in them, cleaning them up, fixing old houses, etc. is a good idea.

I also agree the "gentrification is the cause of problems" is not just exhaustive, but a straight up lie told by people who have realized that if you just say "progressive" things over and over again, you can stay in power. A lot of people, and this goes for people on the left and right and everywhere in between, view social issues (like gentrification) in a generalized way, instead of on a case by case basis. You just cannot tell that gentrification in DC = gentrification in NYC = gentrification in Boston = gentrification in Philadelphia, and that the blanket "answer to gentrification" is simply stone-walling NIMBYISM. Stone-walling NIMBYISM may very well be the best course of action in a supremely wealthy smaller city like Boston. Rent control very well make sense in Manhattan, the most desired and successful business center in the world. A wealth tax in SF with the "highest per capita of millionaires in the world" very well make sense to fund social programs. But guess what? the City of Philadelphia is not any of those places and is not in a great position to just be implementing new taxes, down-zoning commerical corridors, rent-controlling random neighborhoods, etc

Last edited by TempleGuy1000; Oct 4, 2022 at 6:54 PM.
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  #5139  
Old Posted Oct 4, 2022, 7:22 PM
3rd&Brown 3rd&Brown is offline
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However, I think everyone can agree that improving the Q-O-L of these areas, investing in them, cleaning them up, fixing old houses, etc. is a good idea.
I agree with you, however, I will point out that for the most part, and lets be honest. The city isn't doing this for ANYONE. My frustration is building to the point of near disgust.

The difference between poor areas and rich (and gentrifying) areas is that difference between the good conditions you see in those neighborhoods and the truly awful neighborhoods is not because the city is investing more in good neighborhoods, it's because locals have the means (money, time) to figure it out on their own. Then they get excoriated for caring about how their neighborhood looks and fortunately (or unfortunately) blamed for the disparity in neighborhood conditions even though they're literally just doing what the city cannot seem to figure out.

The security detail article was mind blowing. It's framed as an us-versus-them article when in reality it should have been framed as a "when the police department tells you it can't afford to pull 3 officer out of a patrol car at the Wawa and have them walk Frankford Avenue, don't believe them". Then, two days later, we get an article talking about how 500 qualified cops are literally pushing mail around headquarters and another 600 are on fake disability, it's like BLOW.THE.ENTIRE.THING UP.
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  #5140  
Old Posted Oct 4, 2022, 8:22 PM
TempleGuy1000 TempleGuy1000 is online now
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I agree with you, however, I will point out that for the most part, and lets be honest. The city isn't doing this for ANYONE. My frustration is building to the point of near disgust.

The difference between poor areas and rich (and gentrifying) areas is that difference between the good conditions you see in those neighborhoods and the truly awful neighborhoods is not because the city is investing more in good neighborhoods, it's because locals have the means (money, time) to figure it out on their own. Then they get excoriated for caring about how their neighborhood looks and fortunately (or unfortunately) blamed for the disparity in neighborhood conditions even though they're literally just doing what the city cannot seem to figure out.

The security detail article was mind blowing. It's framed as an us-versus-them article when in reality it should have been framed as a "when the police department tells you it can't afford to pull 3 officer out of a patrol car at the Wawa and have them walk Frankford Avenue, don't believe them". Then, two days later, we get an article talking about how 500 qualified cops are literally pushing mail around headquarters and another 600 are on fake disability, it's like BLOW.THE.ENTIRE.THING UP.
I agree 1000% with you 3rd&Brown. I could write a book to you about how I believe it got the way it did, but all it really comes down to is this: The city of Philadelphia has been fucked up for a very very long time. Long enough that the bare minimum level of service in a first-world community is not met and the so-called "leaders" who have been in charge for so long are so rotted to their core, that they can't figure out which way is up.

That's why I personally have got a lot more critical and angry in the last few years. The city has been flush with money because of an unexpected (and frankly undeserved) increase in tax revenues due to the city reviving by itself. Where has these hundreds of millions of dollars been going? According to the city controller, NO ONE FUCKING KNOWS and there are no controls in place to even get a handle on it.

This is probably one of the more controversial things I will say: but all those articles about "how making Washington Ave. safe will ruin the neighborhood" or the "Fishtown Security" article you mention exposes the fact that a lot of the left's "culture" at it's core is nearly as rotten as the rights. Or maybe not "rotten" in the way the GOP is vindictively evil, but in an anti-intellectual way that people can't diagnose the problems in front of their nose because their so poisoned by outside forces blinding reality of what's important or what it even means to be a good citizen.

Philly never had it's 'Rudy G'-mayor. As much of a scumbag he turned out to be, he forced real change to clean the city and make it more business friendly and successful again. We almost had our moment with Sam Katz. But instead we got the great shame of John Street.
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