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  #13041  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2022, 7:42 PM
Niftybox Niftybox is offline
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  #13042  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2022, 12:31 AM
bhunsberger bhunsberger is offline
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Originally Posted by citywatch View Post


btw, this forum on dtla should be about the subj of...dtla. Odd obsessions or complaints about other things both don't fit & aren't terribly interesting. There are so many details or angles about dt to discuss, that if ppl can't come up something that fits the subj, then another forum...such as about personality traits....probably would be better for them.
That’s rich coming from you.
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  #13043  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2022, 12:45 AM
bhunsberger bhunsberger is offline
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Originally Posted by hughfb3 View Post

And just because I love them, the Frankentowers (Sen+ral) still stand beautifully. Holland Partners has been doing high quality work. They also did the Apex II/Concerto/Alina tower expansion and it also is high quality. They've since sold all 3 towers and moved on to other projects




Absolutely love the one on the southwest corner. The whole building is nice, but the section along 8th st with the arched windows looks so good. Totally my vibe! A bit Mediterranean, yeah? Wish they were double the height though!
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  #13044  
Old Posted Sep 18, 2022, 2:40 AM
citywatch citywatch is offline
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Interesting bit of background on a property in dtla...

Video Link


Video Link



^ I recall when the land to the south of that bldg, across from the ace hotel, was a large parking lot. It doesn't seem that long ago when I was wondering when fill in devlpt like this was going to break ground & be completed...


Video Link



btw, a post above, instead of commenting about the many topics that relate to dtla, including something I may have pointed out in a post, seems more interested in what? Personally, I find the subj of dtla way more interesting....more relevant too....than spending time posting something like, 'that's rich....'
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  #13045  
Old Posted Sep 20, 2022, 1:45 AM
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From LA Reddit, a sweeping view of the downtown skyline from above the new viaduct:


source
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  #13046  
Old Posted Sep 20, 2022, 4:49 PM
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this person strolls though key parts of dt, ending around the renovated herald ex bldg. He begins on Grand Av north of 12th st....that one section looks so east coast like...due to the trees....that I always do a brief double take when I first see it. If producers of movies or TV shows want a part of dtla that doesn't look LAish, that's the street to use. meanwhile, some vandals have finally broken into the old may co bldg & grafittied up a few areas of the 2nd level of the terracotta.


Video Link



^ As I fast forward through vids like that, I notice both parking lots from the past that finally have been filled in & parking lots or old small bldgs that still need to be filled in. So dt remains a work in progress. but the way it was like in general not all that long ago compared with the current scene in 2022 shows dt is finally punching closer to LA's weight class.
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  #13047  
Old Posted Sep 21, 2022, 12:16 AM
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Note: I didn't post the entire article, but follow the link to learn more about the Lucas Museum's recent acquisitions.
-------------------------------------------

Lucas Museum delays opening to 2025, “all areas of construction” moving forward

Deborah Vankin
Los Angeles Times
September 20, 2022



The $1-billion Lucas Museum of Narrative Art, which is rising in Exposition Park, has pushed back its opening date from 2023 to 2025. The two-year delay, the museum says, is due to pandemic complications, specifically supply chain issues that have made the procuring of certain construction materials difficult.

“It’s not one thing, it’s an accumulation of things,” Lucas Museum Director Sandra Jackson-Dumont, says in an interview. “It’s definitely supply chains, delays in getting materials, manufacturer issues, there are all these pieces that have together created this kind of impact on the schedule.”

The museum broke ground in March 2018 and “topped out” — the term for setting the final beam within its steel structure in place — in March 2021. In April 2021, the museum pushed its targeted 2022 debut by a year because of pandemic-related delays. COVID-19 health and safety protocols had slowed construction, it said at the time. Now, Jackson-Dumont says, two more years are needed not only for construction, but to also make sure the finished building is suitable to house art.

“We wanted to give ourselves time, once the building is complete, to make sure the building goes through the proper readiness and remediation processes, so we can ensure the artwork is safe coming into the building,” Jackson-Dumont says, referring to temperature controls and other environmental conditions. “And that process — the mitigation — really takes a period of time.”

The timeline delay, Jackson-Dumont says, will not affect the projected cost of the building. “The budget — that’s where we are and we had a contingency in place,” she says.

Filmmaker George Lucas and wife Mellody Hobson are “the primary funding source” for the museum. Should the cost go up, Jackson-Dumont says, “they are committed to supporting this project.”

“But we are not talking about the cost going up, that’s not a conversation we’re having,” she adds. “They are committed to realizing this incredible asset.”



The five-story, 300,000-square-foot, futuristic-looking museum, which is rising next door to the L.A. Memorial Coliseum, was designed by MAD Architects founder Ma Yansong. It has an arched belly, creating a shaded, open-air plaza underneath that visitors can pass through into Exposition Park. The building is primarily composed of steel, glass and concrete along with wood, geofoam, fiberglass-reinforced polymer and plaster.

Geofoam has been a problem — the lightweight filling material, often used to help create topography, is one material that’s been affected by supply chain issues, the museum says. There have also been issues with shipping parts from Europe, such as light fixtures, glass and custom elevator components. COVID safety protocols, ensuring on-site workers are safe, continue to slow construction as well.

Still, Jackson-Dumont says, “progress in all areas of construction” is moving forward. The museum is responding nimbly and creatively, she says, shifting focus in order to keep construction going. That’s meant accelerating construction in certain areas they might not have gotten to yet, while other areas slowed.

“We’re going where we can work,” Jackson-Dumont says.

One construction milestone, of late, is the installation of more than 1,500 curved, fiberglass-reinforced polymer panels that make up the building’s surface. They’re currently being affixed to the southern side of the building. Each creamy white panel is hand-finished and unique; together, they give the building an organic, biomorphic feel, the museum says.

“It feels so significant,” Jackson-Dumont says of the panel installation. “It almost feels like a topping out in some ways, because you’re starting to see the skin of this building.”

The fourth-floor galleries — about 80,000 square feet of exhibition space to showcase fine and popular art from Lucas’ personal collection as well as “Star Wars” ephemera — are well underway, with the area’s ceiling grid and permanent walls complete. Mechanical, electrical, plumbing and life safety systems are roughed-in, meaning mostly installed. Parts of the glass elevators are being installed, as are window installations.

The museum’s two theaters and classroom spaces are also in motion , as are the restaurant and cafe, gift shop and event spaces.



Development of the museum’s 11-acre campus, which replaces a parking lot, includes a park and gardens designed by Studio-MLA founder Mia Lehrer. Planting has begun of more than 200 trees, including cathedral and cork oaks, jacarandas and pink trumpet trees. Eventually there will be more than 30 species, and additional landscaping will feature drought-tolerant and California native plants. The park’s amphitheater benches are installed and work is underway on a pedestrian bridge and hanging gardens.

One thing Jackson-Dumont is geeking out on: the two underground garages. They’ll include 2,300 parking spots, 600 more than were formerly available in the aboveground asphalt lot. She’s also especially excited about the “porous design” of the building and surrounding campus — how it flows, seamlessly, into Exposition Park. “It feels like a continuous campus connecting us to these already existing great resources,” Jackson-Dumont says.

The Lucas Museum has also been growing its collection of more than 100,000 artworks across painting, sculpture, photography, movies, murals, comic art, book and magazine illustrations and filmmaking objects and ephemera. It has particularly deep holdings of work by Norman Rockwell, Ernie Barnes, Jacob Lawrence, Kadir Nelson and N.C. Wyeth, among other artists.
. . . .
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  #13048  
Old Posted Sep 21, 2022, 2:17 AM
dax_gray dax_gray is offline
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That Lucas park is shaping along really well. Trees, some sidewalks, small hills… Take notes LA.
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  #13049  
Old Posted Sep 21, 2022, 4:22 AM
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Originally Posted by dax_gray View Post
That Lucas park is shaping along really well. Trees, some sidewalks, small hills… Take notes LA.

The LA Times article has good view of the trees planted for the adjacent park, which looks like it could be a splendid park that lives up to expectation judging by the fact that they didn’t skimp on trees and you can see a generous amount of terraces and elevated terrain all over the place, which is the key to engaging, dynamic parks. It’s not going to follow the disappointing mundane flatness of Grand Park. This one actually has imagination.

https://www.latimes.com/entertainmen...pening-to-2025
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  #13050  
Old Posted Sep 21, 2022, 4:52 AM
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I agree. I believe the park/public space is just as important of a component as the museum itself. By the looks of it, both are on the way to being very well executed!
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  #13051  
Old Posted Sep 21, 2022, 5:04 AM
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Originally Posted by homebucket View Post
I agree. I believe the park/public space is just as important of a component as the museum itself. By the looks of it, both are on the way to being very well executed!
The park is absolutely important--there just aren't enough large public green spaces in LA, especially in the urban core.

The delay is frustrating but understandable, and I'm psyched about this project's design and qualify. The LAT article states that the museum and new park will flow well into adjacent attractions, which is especially needed.
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  #13052  
Old Posted Sep 21, 2022, 5:16 AM
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Very disappointing...I thought it would open by at least mid 2023 or, at worst, the end of next yr. But 2025!!? The concert hall for the Colburn school at 2nd & Hill st is likely going to be similarly affected by worldwide supply chains issues. I believe the school also hasn't raised all the funds needed for the proj, & costs along with delays are soaring. The youtuber jsocal walked right by the school's site in dtla just a few days ago. Interesting that both the lucas & colburn concert hall are located....or will be located...on former parking lots.

Seeing old surface parking lots go adios in dtla & LA is the best thing that can happen. If such lots, however, were at least surrounded by landscaped berms, that would help.

https://youtu.be/FYuGOGCJGCY?t=546

Quote:

COURTESY OF LUCAS MUSEUM/JAKS PRODUCTIONS. PHOTO BY SAND HILL MEDIA / ERIC FURIE

Additionally, THR learned that construction is currently focused on adding the panels that will clad the building, along with planting trees in the extensive park grounds (designed by studio MLA designed for an area of L.A. historically lacking in parks). The early-stage site tour also revealed the beginnings of an outdoor rain fountain to cool the building with recycled water, and a moat-like cavity surrounding the building, which protects it in the case of a seismic event. An oculus in the center of the construction gives access to the open sky, and the circular roof will be marked by trees on one half and solar panels on the other.
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  #13053  
Old Posted Sep 21, 2022, 5:46 PM
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lucas & his work have long been identified with the west coast, although more with SF & Nocal (lucas ranch) than with socal. But Lucas did attend USC, so his museum being in Expo park in the long run is more fitting. Still, when I think of all the things that govt officials in LA do that drive me nuts & they can be blamed for, I'd be towards them if they had bobbled the lucas museum...

Quote:
Editorial: The Lucas Museum is looking better and better. What an error Chicago made.

The museum also has announced acquisitions of work from Lucas Cranach the Elder, John Singer Sargent, Weshoyot Alvitre, Ernie Barnes, Jaime Hernandez and Cara Romero, adding to Lucas’ deep Norman Rockwell holdings. And it said it was all coming together slowly but surely for a 2025 opening (pushed back due to pandemic-era delays), with a park and gardens integrated into what will be an 11-acre campus. They’ve even planted 200 new trees.

To refresh your memory, Chicago turned down this museum in 2016 after an extensive campaign against it by the Chicago group known as Friends of the Parks, which later turned its ire and clout on the Obama Presidential Center, albeit with less success. Had that museum been part of our thinking on all that now, there would have been a tourist-drawing anchor already in place. Alas, the site is still a parking lot.

History will not be kind to this decision, made with a big dose of snobbery about a populist museum interested in stories and comic-book art that is predictably turning out to be more significant in terms of holdings than its detractors claimed. And, we’ll venture, in appeal.

meanwhile, LA is facing a major drought & this more kinetic feature of bunker hill has since been replaced with a lawn & plants. As I was watching this, from I believe the late 1980s, I grade dtla as better today...minus issues of crime & homelessness...than it was when the Water court had just opened. Still, I have mixed feelings about the fountain & pool no longer being in Cal plaza. But since the moat & fountains around the dwp bldg have been shut down, would the owner of the cal plaza done the same thing to the water court if it still had water?


Video Link

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  #13054  
Old Posted Sep 21, 2022, 6:42 PM
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Between the Lucas Museum, expansion of the already great Natural History Museum, and new enclosure for the Endeavour shuttle at the California Science Center... Expo Park will absolutely be a must-see destination for LA tourists. Not to mention catching a game at Banc of California Stadium or The Coliseum... as well as the California African American Museum. Icing on the cake is the Expo Line (E Line?) connectivity.
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  #13055  
Old Posted Sep 21, 2022, 7:49 PM
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^ A stroll through both USC & Expo pk last summer by this out of towner, from the east coast, helped give me a better sense of what the southern adjunct to dtla is all about. Sometimes vids give more angles to a place than a personal visit alone does...

https://youtu.be/aSb1KWQJdc4?t=3747

btw, the expo line has been up & running for some time, as the tourist at end of his vid implies. Although some Expo line users haven't been happy about the travel time since parts of the train are slowed by surface traffic. That's one of those times that local govt officials have made decisions that drive me crazy. Although grade separation would have admittedly cost more money.
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  #13056  
Old Posted Sep 21, 2022, 9:39 PM
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From left: Oceanwide’s Lu Zhiqiang, Greenland’s Hu Gang, and Vanke Group’s Zhu Jiusheng
(FISF, Wikipedia, Pacific Park, Getty)



China’s debt cataclysm threatens US real estate projects

These problems in China are spilling over to the U.S. The Chinese were once the most aggressive foreign buyers of real estate in the U.S., acquiring $17.4 billion in real estate by 2016. Companies unknown to most Americans, such as Greenland USA parent Greenland Group, Oceanwide, Vanke and Anbang Insurance Group, were picking up some of the priciest buildings and development sites in the U.S. In 2014, Greenland acquired a 70 percent stake in Forest City Enterprises’ $5 billion Atlantic Yards project in Brooklyn and planned its $1 billion Metropolis project in L.A. Oceanwide paid $200 million for the site of its 2-million-square-foot L.A. project.

These Chinese developers also had an eye for distress. Four of the 15 largest property investments made by Chinese firms in the U.S. from 2012 to 2014 rescued troubled commercial assets, according to data from Real Capital Analytics. Investing in the U.S. was an opportunity for China to show off its economic muscle. It envisioned building the tallest skyscrapers in New York, the West’s financial and cultural capital and the ultimate symbol of power and wealth. But pouring concrete and installing drywall was a different matter.

“They did not understand what was really important. I mean, in China, they don’t use architects and engineers like they do here — the design process is different,” said James Albert, a former project manager for Oceanwide’s development in L.A. He said the Chinese firms’ ignorance went unaddressed by the deferential Americans they worked with.

“They absolutely didn’t understand how to develop in the U.S., but there was this overabundance of caution with respect to culture,” Albert said. “Nobody was willing to say, ‘You don’t understand, you’re not in China.’” Albert said he left after realizing the firm was in financial trouble.

“I knew the (L.A.) project was going to go under, I knew it,” he said. “The bills were stacked to the ceiling and they missed so many promises. The writing was on the wall.”

Greenland faced similar issues at its L.A. development, according to the former employee. The firm wanted to build all three towers at once, although U.S. developers typically build in phases. Greenland USA declined to answer specific questions about its Metropolis or Brooklyn developments. Greenland and Oceanwide were also relying on condo buyers coming from China and leasing to luxury retailers like Gucci and Prada to attract Chinese shoppers. Overleveraged Chinese developers with maturing debt will have an especially tough time borrowing money. “The critical issue is financing,” said Rothstein of Greenberg Traurig. “The availability of financing is not the same.”

A former Greenland employee echoed the thought, saying Chinese developers “brought capital, and they don’t bring that anymore.”

Oceanwide has also run out of options on its project in L.A. In 2019, the Chinese developer’s effort to refinance $1.1 billion in debt failed. Deep-pocketed U.S. developers such as Brookfield Asset Management and CIM Group looked to buy the site, but couldn’t pencil it out because of rising construction costs, according to a source.

Firms that plan to hold onto their properties will likely need to find a development partner. Experts say that some Chinese players are waiting to see if the government will offer some sort of capital injection. If some of these developers were to get an infusion of cash, they would still have to deal with completing their stalled, half-finished projects in the U.S.

“Putting a building at that scale in the freezer, and then thawing it out without freezer burn,” pondered Albert, the former Oceanwide project manager, of the firm’s moribund L.A. development. “I don’t know if contractors know how to do that.”

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  #13057  
Old Posted Sep 22, 2022, 12:48 AM
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The museum is one of those rare projects where you just know the final building is going to look exactly like the renderings even 2 years away from completion.
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  #13058  
Old Posted Sep 22, 2022, 1:59 AM
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Originally Posted by citywatch View Post
I know an American that worked for Greenland on Metropolis leasing and they had a solid plan on how to market the retail space, but the Chinese players didn’t listen. Now all that retail is sitting vacant. They left the project shortly after they knew their voice wasn’t going to be heard.
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  #13059  
Old Posted Sep 22, 2022, 10:45 PM
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The transformation of the former Nomad Hotel into Hotel Per La is now complete with today’s debut of Per L’Ora restaurant and the adjacent Cafe Ora. Even with the new tenants removing the heavy, tapestry-like curtains from the building’s massive windows and bringing in a brighter color scheme, the restaurant and lobby still feel very much like an old-school hang, especially at the 30-seat bar.

The Nomad Hotel barely got a chance to dig its heels into Los Angeles. The New York-based Sydell Group opened the property in early 2018 and closed it permanently in March 2021. HN Capital and Sage Hospitality Group took over the historic bank building and shifted the Nomad’s East Coast-centric sensibilities to one emphasizing West Coast themes and talent.

Third-generation Angeleno and chef Courtney Van Dyke — whose resume includes time at Montage Beverly Hills and Four Seasons Beverly Wilshire — developed the restaurant’s menu, along with Bar Clara’s. “This menu is very much inspired by LA,” says Van Dyke. “It’s not only the neighborhoods, but all the cultures around LA. I look at this menu and I see all of my friends, I see everyone I’ve grown up with, all the neighborhoods, and [things I’ve seen while] I’m running around LA.”




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  #13060  
Old Posted Sep 23, 2022, 2:41 AM
ocman ocman is offline
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I’m happy they kept the beautiful space more or less the same. Though the changes they did make are a downgrade. The sofa and seat covers are atrocious. Who does seat covers anymore? It’s a beautiful Italian space and they Pottery Barned it up. I’m guessing the furniture just didn’t come with the sale.

More thoughts about Lucas Museum, the Bill Robertson Lane between Lucas and the stadium is no longer needed. Imagine how much bigger the park space could be, and how much grander and more cohesive the whole masterplan would be if Lucas wasn’t cut off by that street.

Even if the art fails, the library that’s included should be a great place to warrant return visits.
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