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  #13021  
Old Posted Sep 14, 2022, 6:57 AM
CaliNative CaliNative is offline
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Originally Posted by scania View Post
That is so true…SF and NYC are seeing a decline. I was just up in SF and I was really surprised the retailers that have closed and not being replaced. At least as of now.
Shoplifting is out of control in SF. In many cases, nothing is done, nobody goes to jail. People go in with bags and just load up, while the employees gawk. What store could operate and make a profit? Shoplifting is bad in many part of L.A., but not SF bad.
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  #13022  
Old Posted Sep 14, 2022, 7:43 AM
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Nice. Just for fun, here’s what it looked like before. BTW, I hope they waterblast the grimy sidewalks before opening.



And here’s what it looked like in 1916.

Post-renovation, the building looks a lot more like it did when new than when it was grimy!

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Originally Posted by CaliNative View Post
Shoplifting is out of control in SF. In many cases, nothing is done, nobody goes to jail. People go in with bags and just load up, while the employees gawk. What store could operate and make a profit? Shoplifting is bad in many part of L.A., but not SF bad.
Shoplifting is a problem in San Francisco for sure, but the department stores and other stores in San Francisco's Union Square shopping district are closing because, in addition to the rise of online shopping, they lack sufficient sales to justify the high rents.

Basically, SF's dense concentration of department stores and boutiques downtown was supported by office workers in the adjacent Financial District, Bay Area day trippers taking BART and Muni downtown, and national/international visitors staying in nearby hotels. COVID emptied the office towers (they are still only a third full), public transit use has cratered, and the big crowds of national and, especially, free-spending international tourists vanished. And the office workers and international tourists, particularly, did not return after things normalized. It's a money-losing proposition for stores to continue to pay (still) astronomical rents in such conditions.
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  #13023  
Old Posted Sep 14, 2022, 4:17 PM
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I recall several yrs ago reading an article about dtla by a british writer....I think it was in the guardian newspaper. She described how streets like broadway had a variety of classic beaux arts bldgs that had become largely abandoned & rundown. Her readers in the UK would learn that & get a negative impression of LA....not to mention all the publicity through the yrs about dt's skid row. That's why the restoration of bldgs like the Meritt is not coming a second too soon.

although dtla in 2022 is coming closer to punching at LA's weight class, things like Covid have slowed down the pace. But if city hall & devlprs can learn to work together...instead of being at each other's throats, no thanks to nimbys...that will help. Right now, local govnt is wobbling in at least keeping things clean & safe. The way city hall is managed over the next 5 to 10 yrs can either help or hurt dtla.


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Jaime Lee, left, chief executive of Jamison Realty Inc., and her brother Garrett Lee, president of Jamison Properties, are reflected in the facade of the Crosby apartments in L.A.'s Koreatown
neighborhood. A growing number of Los Angeles-area office buildings are being converted to residential use as demand for offices stalls. (Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)



The former Texaco high-rise is part of a national push to convert aging office buildings to residential use as demand for housing surpasses the need for offices in many locations. Turning old office buildings into apartments or condos is hardly new, but expected cutbacks in office rentals as companies’ permanently adapt to remote work prompted by the pandemic have spurred new interest among landlords in switching the uses of their buildings in the years ahead.

Think tank Rand Corp. identified in a March study 2,300 underutilized office and hotel properties in Los Angeles County that could be converted to housing. Most of them are older office buildings with big chunks of unrented space. If all the underused buildings were converted to housing it would add as many as 113,000 units, Rand said, about 9% to 14% of the housing Los Angeles County needs to produce over the next eight years to meet demand.

Some neighborhoods such as downtown L.A. and Koreatown, where the Crosby stands, have concentrations of tall, aging office towers suitable for housing but many other candidates are less obvious, architect Karin Liljegren said.

Among those who’ve taken on conversions at a large scale are Jaime and Garrett Lee, two leaders of the Jamison real estate empire founded by their father, David Lee. The elder Lee is an internist and immigrant from South Korea who bought up struggling office high-rises in Koreatown after the 1992 Los Angeles civil uprising depressed their values. He went on to acquire many other large commercial buildings in the Los Angeles area and became one of the region’s largest commercial landlords, later expanding into developing new residential projects including the luxury Circa apartments downtown and Kurve on Wilshire near Koreatown.

It was, however, also designed by Welton Becket and located across the boulevard from the Art Deco landmark Bullocks Wilshire department store building now occupied by Southwestern Law School. Jamison turned the former Borax building into 127 apartments. “Much to our surprise,” Jaime Lee said, “we leased them all in three months.”.

So far, Jamison has converted seven office buildings to residential use with a combined total of more than 1,200 units, nearly all of which are leased. More makeovers are in the works. “We’re maybe halfway through” converting adaptable Jamison buildings, Jaime Lee said.

Liljegren, founder of architecture firm Omgivning, is more skeptical about office landlords’ prospects as businesses adapt to remote work. “Vacancy is only going up,” she said. “We’re just beginning to see it.”

Converting an existing building to a new use is more environmentally sustainable than building a new one, but the price of acquiring office buildings can be a barrier to conversion, Rand said. In neighborhoods with high property values such as West Los Angeles, it’s difficult for housing developers to afford to buy an office building, pay to convert it to housing and then collect high enough rents to turn a profit.

Downtown Los Angeles, the city’s oldest office market, presents more opportunities
. Nearly a third of the 37,000 new housing units created since downtown’s residential renaissance kicked off in 2000 were created through adaptive reuse of mostly old office buildings. “Adaptive reuse reshaped downtown,” said Nick Griffin, executive director of the Los Angeles Downtown Center Business Improvement District.

The arrival of thousands of residents changed the character of downtown L.A., which existed in the latter 20th century primarily as a 9-to-5 office district with scarce nightlife, few noteworthy restaurants and no grocery stores. Since the pandemic began, downtown’s population dynamic has shifted again. Occupancy in downtown’s residential buildings has held steady and even grown as new units came to market, but the big office towers built to serve white-collar businesses have remained stubbornly underpopulated.

The disappearance of hundreds of thousands of daily office workers has been a blow to restaurants and other businesses that cater to them. Average Los Angeles office population is hovering at about 43% of what it was before COVID-19, according to Kastle Systems, which provides key-card entry systems used by many companies and tracks patterns of workers’ card swipes.

If more office buildings are converted to residential use, it wouldn’t be a bad thing for downtown, Griffin said. A higher ratio of residents and the activity they bring could make remaining offices more desirable if downtown’s financial core comes to feel more like a neighborhood with energy and active street life.

Even though thousands of apartments have been added in recent years, downtown’s units are consistently about 95% occupied and many more can be added without oversaturating the market, he said. The Los Angeles area is “vastly undersupplied” with housing, he said, and there are few areas outside of downtown where developers can build on a large scale.

“That dynamic is not shifting anytime soon,” he said. “It would be hard to overbuild downtown given those factors.”
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  #13024  
Old Posted Sep 14, 2022, 5:46 PM
NIMBY Slayer NIMBY Slayer is offline
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Can someone please answer this question for me... Why did they do ZERO work on the Los Angeles St. ground floor side of CMC?

Also the side that faces the other building, that side never got the windows upgraded. It still has the old ugly window facade. As if they ran out of money or just wanted to do a half ass job. It's extremely odd.

Let me add, they need to reskin and redo the ground floor of the glass building. That one was left untouched. The glass looks very dated, warn out & faded, and has a bunker-ish ground floor.
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  #13025  
Old Posted Sep 14, 2022, 6:19 PM
homebucket homebucket is online now
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Originally Posted by NIMBY Slayer View Post
Can someone please answer this question for me... Why did they do ZERO work on the Los Angeles St. ground floor side of CMC?

Also the side that faces the other building, that side never got the windows upgraded. It still has the old ugly window facade. As if they ran out of money or just wanted to do a half ass job. It's extremely odd.

Let me add, they need to reskin and redo the ground floor of the glass building. That one was left untouched. The glass looks very dated, warn out & faded, and has a bunker-ish ground floor.
Are they doing the work in phases? Maybe they're moving on to that side of the building next. If not, then it is most likely a cost cutting/saving move since the primary entrance appears to be at the corner of 9th and Main, as well as the food hall entrance on 9th. That appears to be their focal point and where they decided to allocate their funds. Los Angeles is the "back" side of the building after all, as you can see the service and utility entrance on that side. Not many people are going to look at the side that is facing the other building as well. I think as long as they put up interesting window displays it should be fine.

The public plaza and courtyard are very well done though. Very open, inviting, has lots of places to sit and hang out. The benches and planters are well done. Makes you wonder why they can't get Pershing Square right.
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  #13026  
Old Posted Sep 14, 2022, 7:08 PM
NIMBY Slayer NIMBY Slayer is offline
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Originally Posted by homebucket View Post
Are they doing the work in phases? Maybe they're moving on to that side of the building next. If not, then it is most likely a cost cutting/saving move since the primary entrance appears to be at the corner of 9th and Main, as well as the food hall entrance on 9th. That appears to be their focal point and where they decided to allocate their funds. Los Angeles is the "back" side of the building after all, as you can see the service and utility entrance on that side. Not many people are going to look at the side that is facing the other building as well. I think as long as they put up interesting window displays it should be fine.

The public plaza and courtyard are very well done though. Very open, inviting, has lots of places to sit and hang out. The benches and planters are well done. Makes you wonder why they can't get Pershing Square right.
It doesn't look like to be in phases. Perhaps the glass building will be done at a later time but that's a different structure so I get that.

But why do only part of a building (especially when it's an important project like this to bring on high profile tenants)? There is still people who work inside the building and are on that inside part behind the old windows. The LA street side is also very big so to leave it a dead zone and not even update or beautify the ground floor there even a little is just strange. As if they forgot the building has 4 sides to it. I guess 2 out of 4 is good enough for Brookfield 😂
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  #13027  
Old Posted Sep 15, 2022, 5:52 AM
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*EDIT* ^^^ Actually, they are right, they aren't lying. I just google mapd the location (The intersection of Los Angeles and Olympic) just to see if the street view has been updated recently and it has. The section that Nimby is talking about, in between the two buildings, has remained untouched. Still has the same old facade. The last phase of recladding the second building also seems to have been canceled.

The Los Angeles Street ground floor side has definitely been "Touched" but I'm not sure the extra hassle of dropping the bottom floor down to meet the sidewalk would have made any sense from a cost standpoint. Making fortresses habitable costs a lot of money lol and going the extra mile in an area that currently boarders no man's land probably didn't seem feasible after all.

https://la.urbanize.city/post/adidas...-market-center

But Brookfield said they are complete .... so ..... let's assume they changed their mind.

Here's hoping that the Fashion District can FINALLY get the TLC it needs/deserves. I can smell the proposals already on the drawing board for housing and etc. But. Be ready for the massive gentrification that is about to utterly GUT/dismantle/destroy Santee Alley.

Last edited by caligrad; Sep 15, 2022 at 6:12 AM.
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  #13028  
Old Posted Sep 15, 2022, 4:27 PM
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Originally Posted by caligrad View Post
*EDIT* ^^^ Actually, they are right, they aren't lying. I just google mapd the location (The intersection of Los Angeles and Olympic) just to see if the street view has been updated recently and it has. The section that Nimby is talking about, in between the two buildings, has remained untouched. Still has the same old facade. The last phase of recladding the second building also seems to have been canceled.

The Los Angeles Street ground floor side has definitely been "Touched" but I'm not sure the extra hassle of dropping the bottom floor down to meet the sidewalk would have made any sense from a cost standpoint. Making fortresses habitable costs a lot of money lol and going the extra mile in an area that currently boarders no man's land probably didn't seem feasible after all.

https://la.urbanize.city/post/adidas...-market-center

But Brookfield said they are complete .... so ..... let's assume they changed their mind.

Here's hoping that the Fashion District can FINALLY get the TLC it needs/deserves. I can smell the proposals already on the drawing board for housing and etc. But. Be ready for the massive gentrification that is about to utterly GUT/dismantle/destroy Santee Alley.
I live at 8th and Spring. It used to be called Griffin on Spring and now it’s called Sentral. I walked over there yesterday to see what the person was saying and it’s false. Unless there is a misunderstanding. the CFM is totally being renovated. Windows and all.
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  #13029  
Old Posted Sep 15, 2022, 5:07 PM
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Originally Posted by caligrad View Post
The Los Angeles Street ground floor side has definitely been "Touched" but I'm not sure the extra hassle of dropping the bottom floor down to meet the sidewalk would have made any sense from a cost standpoint. Making fortresses habitable costs a lot of money lol and going the extra mile in an area that currently boarders no man's land probably didn't seem feasible after all.
Yeah, I don't think that would've been feasible either without extensive modifications. I think NIMBY Slayer's primary issue though is with the windows. The side facing Olympic Blvd does not appear to have had the facade replaced with new glass windows.

The third building on the Olympic side that has the Union Bank on the ground floor, also appears to have been completely untouched. So I wonder if that will be the last phase. To redo the third building, and replace the facade of the Olympic Blvd facing sides of the other 2 buildings at the same time. Although in all the renderings, they only really show the two main buildings, so maybe they never intended to redo the third building, even though they purchased all three. I guess we'll see.
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  #13030  
Old Posted Sep 15, 2022, 6:50 PM
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I think the hellman bldg on Main st was renovated quite awhile ago, but the owner may have since added to its rooftop? the citizen m hotel is across from it, so not sure the timeline of such projs. But since construction on the hotel was completed awhile ago, this rooftop has to date back a few yrs. But the promo vid of it was posted today.


omgivning.com


Video Link



There are a lot of rooftop rec or restaurant areas in other cities too, such as NYC, but the weather in some of those towns makes features like that not as easy to maintain...or to go dormant for more months of the yr.

.
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  #13031  
Old Posted Sep 15, 2022, 7:13 PM
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Lightbulb

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Originally Posted by scania View Post
I live at 8th and Spring. It used to be called Griffin on Spring and now it’s called Sentral. I walked over there yesterday to see what the person was saying and it’s false. Unless there is a misunderstanding. the CFM is totally being renovated. Windows and all.
Sweet so you're really close. Maybe you can snap some photos to squash everybody's confusion? The google maps image was updated Jan 2022. So maybe they continued some work since? I might head down there this weekend since it's been a while. But so far, based on Google maps Jan 2022, Nimby is right.

To clarify, they may have changed out the glass in the area Nimby is talking about with the same glass from before, but the glass wasn't changed to match the rest of the building. The building on Olympic facade hasn't changed at all, but again, based on Google maps from Jan.

Pictures can fix all this, do us a solid if you can
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  #13032  
Old Posted Sep 15, 2022, 7:20 PM
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Originally Posted by homebucket View Post

The third building on the Olympic side that has the Union Bank on the ground floor, also appears to have been completely untouched. So I wonder if that will be the last phase. To redo the third building, and replace the facade of the Olympic Blvd facing sides of the other 2 buildings at the same time. Although in all the renderings, they only really show the two main buildings, so maybe they never intended to redo the third building, even though they purchased all three. I guess we'll see.
True, I remember they said Phases

Demo the small bank

Add courtyard

redo the first 2 buildings (interior and exterior)

Add roof space

building on Olympic would be done last.

If anything, they should turn that building to live work space or a hotel maybe that's why they paused on it for a while, to see what makes more sense. But the new pedestrian bridges I'm sure kind of sticks them with adding more office space.

At the end of the day, I'm just excited for the construction boom we're about to see in the immediate area thanks to the big names like Addidas in that building. Developers must be salivating. Lots of parking lots/ 1-2 story rundown buildings in the surrounding area ready for the bulldozer. I'm just wondering how Santee Alley will make it out in one piece.
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  #13033  
Old Posted Sep 15, 2022, 7:54 PM
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All of the windows facing the streets (including the Los Angeles street side) on the main CMC building have been replaced. What they didnt do were the alley facing windows... but those only face the glass annex building and are not very visible from the street, unless you are zooming in with your eyes.





They havent touched the facade of the glass annex building, but they did bring the lobby areas in it up to the main building standards

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  #13034  
Old Posted Sep 15, 2022, 7:57 PM
homebucket homebucket is online now
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Originally Posted by hughfb3 View Post
All of the windows facing the streets (including the Los Angeles street side) on the main CMC building have been replaced. What they didnt do were the alley facing windows... but those only face the glass annex building and are not very visible from the street, unless you are zooming in with your eyes.

Yep. Those are the windows in question. NIMBY Slayer, caligrad, and I are wondering why they weren't also replaced.
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  #13035  
Old Posted Sep 15, 2022, 8:02 PM
NIMBY Slayer NIMBY Slayer is offline
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Originally Posted by hughfb3 View Post
All of the windows facing the streets (including the Los Angeles street side) on the main CMC building have been replaced. What they didnt do were the alley facing windows... but those only face the glass annex building and are not very visible from the street, unless you are zooming in with your eyes.





They havent touched the facade of the glass annex building, but they did bring the lobby areas in it up to the main building standards

As I said and circled in the image I posted above, the windows that face the other building were not replaced and the LA street side ground floor is still bunker-ish, not much was done there to make it more friendly to the street. So not sure why they replaced all the windows but not that entire side. Yes, when you walk by it, it's very noticeable.

The 2nd glass building is untouched, but as I mentioned, as it's a separate building technically, perhaps they will do that in the future.

So Scania needs to get glasses or learn to look better before making accusations.
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  #13036  
Old Posted Sep 15, 2022, 8:07 PM
homebucket homebucket is online now
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Originally Posted by NIMBY Slayer View Post
As I said and circled in the image I posted above, the windows that face the other building were not replaced and the LA street side ground floor is still bunker-ish, not much was done there to make it more friendly to the street. So not sure why they replaced all the windows but not that entire side. Yes, when you walk by it, it's very noticeable.

The 2nd glass building is untouched, but as I mentioned, as it's a separate building technically, perhaps they will do that in the future.

So Scania needs to get glasses or learn to look better before making accusations.
Technically, it's the 3rd building. There are 3 total buildings that make up the CMC. It's just that the first two look similar.

I think it still remains to be seen what they'll do with this 3rd building. Like I said before, perhaps if/when they re-skin that one, they'll finish the windows on the Olympic Blvd facing wall of the first 2 buildings together with it, although that obviously will disrupt operations on the first 2 buildings as well. So it is a bit puzzling. Maybe they don't plan to move anyone into the offices on that side of the building yet.
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  #13037  
Old Posted Sep 15, 2022, 10:28 PM
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Originally Posted by hughfb3 View Post
All of the windows facing the streets (including the Los Angeles street side) on the main CMC building have been replaced. What they didnt do were the alley facing windows... but those only face the glass annex building and are not very visible from the street, unless you are zooming in with your eyes.
Thank you!!!
Some people won’t be satisfied. In other news, there’s an article on Urbanize.La about DTLA. I’m sure the haters wouldn’t want to read. Ha
At any rate, DTLA growth has been amazing. I would’ve never thought 10 years ago I would live in DTLA. Maestro’s,Capital Grill, Fogo de Chao, Apple Store, etc etc…who would’ve imagined we would these restaurants and retailers in DTLA.
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  #13038  
Old Posted Sep 16, 2022, 6:48 PM
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Despite its longstanding reputation for urban sprawl, recent years have seen developers look inward in Los Angeles, which has experienced a residential boom in its urban core. That boom, according to a new study released by Yardi Matrix, ranks as the second most prolific in the entire country over the past decade.

^ Long time in coming, maybe for over 90 yrs. DTLA as recently as the 1990s had only a small pull as a place where ppl in LA would live or want to live. Mainly pensioners or the lower income called dt home in the past. Better income ppl started leaving dt around the early 1900s, & streets like broadway or nicer retailing in dt in general dependent on them started going downhill by the 1940s, 1950s.

Nicer housing after bunker hill's heyday...which lasted from around the late 1800s to 1920s....was limited to this when these apt towers at Fig between 1st & 3rd Sts were built in the late 1960s. Reviving dtla has been a very slow process, but better late than never.



curbedla.com


If this had been in effect yrs ago, dtla would have long punched at LA's weight class instead of below it.

https://youtu.be/q56MtqmT0bI?t=244
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  #13039  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2022, 12:45 AM
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Great update!
I’ve been trying to find information on the renovation tower behind the Apple Store. That building is going to be a great addition for those who love that style of condo/lofts to live. And also the street activity will continue to increase. Though that section is already pretty busy anyway after maybe 10 or 11am.
Here you go: https://la.urbanize.city/post/constr...ect-8th-spring
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  #13040  
Old Posted Sep 17, 2022, 4:41 AM
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Big THANKS!!!
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