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  #51841  
Old Posted Jan 26, 2023, 8:47 PM
BuildThemTaller BuildThemTaller is offline
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Originally Posted by Toasty Joe View Post
^ couldn't miss an opportunity to put colored panels on the affordable housing to distinguish it from other neighbors who are paying full price! God forbid affordable housing could pass as market rate.
Seems like a slight overreaction to the subtle pop of color. Thank your lucky stars that this tasteful and somewhat interesting design doesn't look like this condo building in my neighborhood in Queens.

https://d2kcmk0r62r1qk.cloudfront.ne...33_l_haus.webp

Last edited by Tom In Chicago; Jan 26, 2023 at 9:39 PM. Reason: Please use hyperlinks for off-topic images
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  #51844  
Old Posted Jan 26, 2023, 9:39 PM
BuildThemTaller BuildThemTaller is offline
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You view it as a marker of affordable housing, but it might be that market rate developers are overly conservative and afraid of including a pop of color. Go to other cities and you see plenty of examples of developments that include panels like this.

Here's a new condo building in Denver.


A SFH in Seattle


A condo building in Portland


Some market rate apartments in Minneapolis


And on and on...
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  #51845  
Old Posted Jan 26, 2023, 10:39 PM
Toasty Joe Toasty Joe is online now
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Pops of color within a building scheme can be tasteful, like the Portland example above (which is just painted railings not colored panels), but more often than not they look cheaply done, like the Denver and MPLS examples.

Chicago has a few examples of tacky colored panels on market rate housing (see 160 N Elizabeth), but the affordable developments are often over-the-top. From an optimist's POV, they add a splash of color to a cheap building. From a realist's POV, it's easier to get local support for an affordable development if the building is obviously cheaper-looking than the neighbors' full-priced homes, even if it means their neighborhood looks tackier.

This isn't to say every building should be expensive masonry or uniformly designed. It's just many of these developments feel like they're rounding third base with a solid building design and then decide to add colored panels to dumb it down. On the bright side, they're relatively easy to paint/replace.

Imagine if the Emmett Street Apartments in Logan used bronze and/or black accent panels and matching paint for the doors. It'd look 10x better for a marginal cost bump.



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  #51846  
Old Posted Jan 26, 2023, 10:50 PM
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ardecila ardecila is offline
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Originally Posted by Toasty Joe View Post
From an optimist's POV, they add a splash of color to a cheap building. From a realist's POV, it's easier to get local support for an affordable development if the building is obviously cheaper-looking than the neighbors' full-priced homes, even if it means their neighborhood looks tackier.
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This is some pretzel logic. Somehow the neighbors have higher property values if it looks like poor people live nearby?

I think a better explanation is that socially-minded architects are intentionally choosing to reject the kind of muted color palettes that are now associated with luxury housing / gentrification. In this view, bright colors are seen as "working class" with a positive association. It's also a rejection of the dour material palettes of 20th-century public housing, and it's subtly linked to cultural traditions from Latin America, Africa and the Caribbean.
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  #51847  
Old Posted Jan 26, 2023, 11:00 PM
Toasty Joe Toasty Joe is online now
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It's not pretzel logic it's social psychology. People want "fairness" and when they don't feel that's present (i.e. market-rate vs. affordable rates for similar units in the same neighborhood), they'll settle for a lesser common good to feel higher in the social hierarchy.

And sure, the color influences may be true, but architects spin shit all the time about origins of their fads. It also kinda proves my point that they're trying to visually distinguish between housing for different classes within the same neighborhood... "here working class folks, feel pride in being working class with these pops of color, while luxury (market-rate) housing will continue to look different (more tasteful)"
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  #51848  
Old Posted Jan 27, 2023, 12:00 AM
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Would you feel better if the pops of color were missing? Because as a material alone, its pretty much used all over in new construction.

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  #51849  
Old Posted Jan 27, 2023, 12:06 AM
Kngkyle Kngkyle is online now
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Originally Posted by r18tdi View Post
All-Affordable Apartment Building At Edgewater Streets & San Depot Unveiled With Alderman ‘Deeply Invested’

The proposal calls for redeveloping a Streets and Sanitation depot on Broadway into an 11-story apartment building with all-affordable units.

https://blockclubchicago.org/2023/01...eply-invested/

Happy to see Broadway in Edgewater continue to develop beyond the strip mall mecca that it was a decade ago. Still much to do but we've come along way in the past decade. This one looks great and is higher density than a lot of others - a borderline highrise. The flash of color is a little silly but inoffensive enough.
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  #51850  
Old Posted Jan 27, 2023, 12:32 AM
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Originally Posted by rgarri4 View Post
Would you feel better if the pops of color were missing? Because as a material alone, its pretty much used all over in new construction.

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Great video (and thanks ChiPlanner for also posting it). I understand this is a modern way of building and personal taste aside, since we need more housing and this is a cheap & effective way to weatherproof, then build it. But it'd look so much better better if the coloring scheme avoided setting apart the housing as affordable. Given the paint can be any color (likely a little more $ for metallics/mattes), it seems like it's an intentional way to mark those that "don't belong" in a neighborhood.

It doesn't even need to be all monochromatic and/or neutrals, the red example from the video isn't half bad. But in their current state here in Chicago, it's not hard to imagine these will be first on the demo slate when the time comes (~40 years) if they're not renovated inside and out.
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  #51851  
Old Posted Jan 27, 2023, 3:44 PM
JuliusDoaner JuliusDoaner is online now
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Alamo Drafthouse opened today in Wrigleyville...walked by and there was a long line out the door, seems to be real anticipated.
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  #51852  
Old Posted Jan 27, 2023, 3:44 PM
BuildThemTaller BuildThemTaller is offline
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Originally Posted by Toasty Joe View Post
Great video (and thanks ChiPlanner for also posting it). I understand this is a modern way of building and personal taste aside, since we need more housing and this is a cheap & effective way to weatherproof, then build it. But it'd look so much better better if the coloring scheme avoided setting apart the housing as affordable. Given the paint can be any color (likely a little more $ for metallics/mattes), it seems like it's an intentional way to mark those that "don't belong" in a neighborhood.

It doesn't even need to be all monochromatic and/or neutrals, the red example from the video isn't half bad. But in their current state here in Chicago, it's not hard to imagine these will be first on the demo slate when the time comes (~40 years) if they're not renovated inside and out.
I think you are confusing what you see as something that other people would see and notice and associate in this particular way. I guarantee that the overwhelming majority of people, if they notice these somewhat small panels at all - and most won't -, would think "neat" and then move on about their day. They wouldn't even put two and two together that the people walking in and out of the building are "other" in the way you are.
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  #51853  
Old Posted Jan 28, 2023, 4:55 AM
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I'm sure the average person walking through these neighborhoods would notice bright yellow/green/blue panels that make the buildings look like cheap European hostels. Regardless, for those of us who pay even mild attention to new developments across the city, there's still clearly a trend of objectively tacky colored panels reserved for affordable housing.
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  #51854  
Old Posted Yesterday, 2:14 AM
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1020 W Randolph

January 24, 2023

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  #51855  
Old Posted Yesterday, 2:15 AM
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  #51856  
Old Posted Yesterday, 4:59 AM
twister244 twister244 is offline
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God 1020 Randolph is such a great infill project. Small in scale but beautiful in incorporation with the existing neighborhood.
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  #51857  
Old Posted Yesterday, 8:08 PM
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New 7 story (85.5 ft tall) 100 unit building with 32 parking spots at Ashland & 21st Pl, across from Benito Juarez HS. This is currently a big vacant lot and will be built by The Resurrection Project, so it should be mostly if not all affordable housing. Half mile from the 18th St Pink Line stop. Will be named Casa Yucatan

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  #51858  
Old Posted Yesterday, 9:15 PM
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^This is where I like the random panel scheme on the facade. The drawing seems to suggest angled walls inset at the windows. Even the part to the right appears to show some depth and relief in the cladding system. A nice departure from the flat “wallpaper” pattern designs that have been common
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