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  #12781  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2022, 8:15 PM
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Wattleigh Wattleigh is offline
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Really cool East End project that ultimately should tie into the work the BBP has planned for the eastern stretch of the Bayou nearby.

https://www.houstonchronicle.com/bus...photo-23173998

Quote:
Exclusive: New 17-acre East End project aims to make cars obsolete with
walkable, 'micro' living


Marissa Luck
Nov. 18, 2022
Updated: Nov. 18, 2022 1:01 p.m.

Plans to turn a swath of the East End into a walkable district are getting larger and more ambitious – setting the groundwork for what could become Houston’s next 15-minute neighborhood -- where everything a resident needs is within 15 minutes of walking distance.

Houston real estate firm Concept Neighborhood – a group of entrepreneurs that include some of founders of the Axelrad beer garden -- previously unveiled plans to convert the former W-K-M warehouse complex in the East End into a mixed-use destination with hyperlocal businesses and walkable streets.

Now, the scale of the project -- estimated at $350 million -- has grown to 17 acres, and developers plan to incorporate up to 1,000 mixed-income apartments with 250,000 square-feet of retail and office space over the next decade. Working with global architecture firm Gensler on a master plan, Concept Neighborhood is expanding its vision for the district after purchasing additional land from Union Pacific Railway and a handful of other property owners over the past few months.

While some neighbors are nervous about gentrification, the developers, if successful, could achieve what urban planners say could be the first project of its kind in the city: a pedestrian-friendly neighborhood of adaptive reuse buildings where low- and middle-income residents can live affordably, and where owning a car would be optional.

“Houston does not have a neighborhood for people that want to rely on micro mobility, biking and transit," said Jeff Kaplan, principal with Concept Neighborhood who lives in the district he’s helping to redevelop. "People can choose to have a car if they want to, and if they want to live car-free, they can.”

In the project called The Plant/Second Ward, developers are stitching several parcels together to create a nearly mile-long corridor of streets lined with small businesses, restaurants and housing across a mix of about 21 old and new buildings -- starting from Harrisburg Boulevard in the south and extending north to Navigation Boulevard, a critical thoroughfare in the East End a few blocks south of Buffalo Bayou. Concept Neighborhood also plans to convert a section of a former Union Pacific railway into a hike-and-bike trail running one-third of a mile through the development from Commerce Street to Navigation Boulevard.

Quote:
Rendering of the southwest corner of Roberts St. and Commerce St. showing "Roberts Row" ("RxR"), the name of a collection of shops and businesses along Roberts Street proposed within The Plant/Second Ward, a proposed adaptive reuse mixed- use project comprising historic warehouses, plazas, trails, and greenspaces adjacent to the Coffee Plant/Second Ward METRORail stop in the Second Ward.

CultivateLAND


Quote:
An early conceptual map of The Plant/Second Ward district, showing proposed upgraded greenspaces throughout the area (including projects proposed by other entities). The buildings in brighter white are properties Concept Neighborhood controls.

Concept Neighborhood


Quote:
An early conceptual map showing where Concept Neighborhood wants to build residential, retail and office. Harrisburg Boulevard is to the south of the map while Navigation Boulevard is in the right upper corner a few blocks from Buffalo Bayou.

Gensler


Quote:
Rendering of Garrow Street between Sampson Street and Roberts Street in "Roberts Row" ("RxR"), a collection of shops within The Plant/Second Ward district, Concept Neighborhood's proposed adaptive reuse mixed-use project comprising historic warehouses, plazas, trails, and greenspaces adjacent to the Coffee Plant/Second Ward METRORail stop in the Second Ward.

CultivateLAND


Quote:
Rendering of Roberts St. looking north in “Roberts Row” ("RxR"), a proposed adaptive reuse mixed-use project comprising historic warehouses, plazas, trails, and greenspaces adjacent to the Coffee Plant/Second Ward METRORail stop in the Second Ward.

Cultivate Land
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Last edited by Wattleigh; Nov 18, 2022 at 8:25 PM. Reason: link
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  #12782  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2022, 8:56 PM
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Really an excellent project to have and I’m glad it will have affordable housing but these developers who want to build urban development in Houston would be smartest to build along the Light Rail lines or the Bus Rapid Transit in order to achieve full success. I don’t see how it can successfully make living without a car a possibility in that development. I don’t see nearly enough retail development to achieve that.
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  #12783  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2022, 9:57 PM
Jerry1331 Jerry1331 is offline
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Let’s be real it’s mainly homeless on the light rail. Who wants to ride that? Takes you from no where to no where.
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  #12784  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2022, 10:15 PM
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Originally Posted by Jerry1331 View Post
Let’s be real it’s mainly homeless on the light rail. Who wants to ride that? Takes you from no where to no where.
Such optimism. Attitudes like this is why we have a hard time building light rail here. It is essential for a walkable, urban environment.
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  #12785  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2022, 10:22 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Double L View Post
Such optimism. Attitudes like this is why we have a hard time building light rail here. It is essential for a walkable, urban environment.
But the reality is especially post Covid, not nearly many people are using transit outside of transit heavy cities. MetroRail was nasty before the pandemic and until they get a handle on bums and vagrants loitering on the trains, people will drive or Uber.
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  #12786  
Old Posted Nov 18, 2022, 10:39 PM
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That’s not what’s best for urban planning and Metrorail ridership has been going up since the pandemic ended, although it is not at pre-pandemic levels. Public Transportation will be essential for Houston to urbanize or else we will be a dense city relying on cars and that won’t work.
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  #12787  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2022, 3:36 PM
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I haven’t used light rail in forever… I used to use it when I was doing my sports tourism for Astros and Rockets games but I always use ride share now when in downtown Houston.

It’s a shame if the light rail has gone that downhill, I always felt like the best tourism aspect of Houston was the sports facilities and nearby bars/food.
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  #12788  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2022, 5:01 PM
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At one point, Houston had the highest ridership per mile in the country because our system went to all the right neighborhoods. BRT will only help expand ridership. We can’t afford to become a highly dense city while relying on cars.

Last edited by Double L; Nov 19, 2022 at 5:17 PM.
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  #12789  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2022, 10:00 PM
Resident H-Town Resident H-Town is offline
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I love that we have light rail, but it's too slow (about the same as buses) and every line we have is built on street level and interferes heavily with street/pedestrian traffic.

I wish Houston had a mid-high speed subway loop with about 8 or 10 stops max to allow for higher speeds connecting these areas:

1) Downtown

2) U of H

3) TMC/Reliant Park (would love to see the Astrodome area become a destination and a mass transit hub)

4) Rice Village

5) Greenway Plaza

6) The Galleria

7) Uptown Park area

8) Memorial Park



Just for kicks, add an elevated or submerged commuter line (that does not interfere with street/pedestrian traffic) down Westheimer and another one down the Kirby corridor with stops in these areas:



Westheimer Line:

1) U of H

2) Main/Elgin for connectivity w/ Red Line

3) Westheimer/Montrose

4) Westheimer/Kirby

5) Highland Village

6) The Galleria

7) Westhemer/Voss

8) Westchase area

9) Chinatown (obviously not on Westheimer but a direct link to Chinatown).



Come to think of it, a Bellaire/Holcombe Line with no more than two or three stops between Chinatown and TMC (perhaps a stop in Sharpstown and a stop at the Bellaire Triangle before connecting with the Red Line) wouldn't be a bad idea as the QuickLine currently takes 35 minutes to get from Chinatown to TMC. That commute would go from about 35 minutes to 12-15 minutes.



Kirby Line:

1) Reliant Park

2) Kirby/S. Main for connectivity w/ Red Line

3) Rice Village

4) Kirby/Westheimer for connectivity w/ Westheimer Line

5) Regent Square

6) Dallas/Main



I know that would cost a fortune, but it would probably save money in the long run by eliminating the need for an automobile for a lot more people, plus all the issues associated with them like accidents/pollution/gas consumption/etc. that come with automobiles. It could also absolutely change the way we develop. Just imagine having that service available moving forward and the future transit options that would open up to the suburbs/airports...hopefully also either elevated or submerged to prevent street intervention. That's the (logistical) problem with our current light rail system. It creates as much traffic as it alleviates.
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  #12790  
Old Posted Nov 19, 2022, 10:08 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Resident H-Town View Post
I wish Houston had a mid-high speed subway loop with about 8 or 10 stops max to allow for higher speeds...
It is said that the water table is too high for a subway. I would assume keeping it not filled with water during and after one of Houston's downpours (what my mom referred to as "toad stranglers") would cost too much as well.
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  #12791  
Old Posted Nov 20, 2022, 3:02 PM
Resident H-Town Resident H-Town is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bilbao58 View Post
It is said that the water table is too high for a subway. I would assume keeping it not filled with water during and after one of Houston's downpours (what my mom referred to as "toad stranglers") would cost too much as well.
I've heard that before too, but we've had large areas of underground development all over the core of the city for decades from downtown to the med center to the Galleria, plus the subway at IAH airport. I-10 is completely submerged from 610 to downtown, 59 is submerged from Shepherd to Montrose, and they're also talking about submerging 59 from the Montrose area all the way past the Minute Maid Park area.

Every time there's a major flood, our freeways and streets also flood. Maybe I'm missing something, but I just don't get the deterrence with regard to building that kind of subway network. If it's truly not feasible, elevate the trains...although that would likely bring imminent domain into the equation and could still disrupt street/pedestrian traffic along skinny corridors like Westheimer inside the loop.

Last edited by Resident H-Town; Nov 21, 2022 at 5:40 AM.
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  #12792  
Old Posted Nov 21, 2022, 6:18 PM
Green Country Green Country is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Double L View Post
Really an excellent project to have and I’m glad it will have affordable housing but these developers who want to build urban development in Houston would be smartest to build along the Light Rail lines or the Bus Rapid Transit in order to achieve full success. I don’t see how it can successfully make living without a car a possibility in that development. I don’t see nearly enough retail development to achieve that.
Good thing there's a light rail station roughly at the south end of the development (that will provide an easy connection to the University Line BRT). And a north-south bus line and an east-west bus line that go through the development.
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  #12793  
Old Posted Nov 21, 2022, 9:59 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Double L View Post
Really an excellent project to have and I’m glad it will have affordable housing but these developers who want to build urban development in Houston would be smartest to build along the Light Rail lines or the Bus Rapid Transit in order to achieve full success. I don’t see how it can successfully make living without a car a possibility in that development. I don’t see nearly enough retail development to achieve that.
As Green Country mentioned, the Harrisburg Metrorail line runs along the south side of that development.
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  #12794  
Old Posted Nov 22, 2022, 1:50 AM
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I checked google maps and according to google maps, that was not the case. Perhaps I misunderstood.
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  #12795  
Old Posted Nov 22, 2022, 3:01 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Double L View Post
I checked google maps and according to google maps, that was not the case. Perhaps I misunderstood.
The southernmost part of the development looks to be at Harrisburg Blvd & Sampson St. The Coffee Plant/Second Ward station on the Green Line is within 2 blocks of that intersection.

There's actually some decent and small infill going in around that particular station right now, not associated with this project.

On the north side - Platform Group rehabbed 3501 Harrisburg and is building a 3-story structure adjacent to it at 3509 Harrisburg







Drone photo c/o hindesky on HAIF



On the south side, a 5-story apartment complex called Harrisburg Lofts is underway.

Renderings from Paco Jones on HAIF





Drone photo c/o hindesky on HAIF

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  #12796  
Old Posted Nov 22, 2022, 4:03 PM
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Originally Posted by Double L View Post
I checked google maps and according to google maps, that was not the case. Perhaps I misunderstood.
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  #12797  
Old Posted Nov 22, 2022, 6:16 PM
Green Country Green Country is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Double L View Post
I checked google maps and according to google maps, that was not the case. Perhaps I misunderstood.
It shows up on my Google maps... for that matter one doesn't have to go to Google maps, one can see the station in the posts above.
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  #12798  
Old Posted Nov 23, 2022, 3:49 AM
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Originally Posted by bilbao58 View Post
Wattleigh’s post is correct. The light rail station is two blocks away.
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  #12799  
Old Posted Nov 23, 2022, 2:10 PM
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Autry Park

The next residential tower may be coming sooner than later. Per this information from hindesky on HAIF...

Quote:
The tower crane operator who works for TAS just messaged me on IG saying his bosses just told him they are moving him to a Hanover high rise project to build a 42 story high rise here in Houston. He is currently operating the tower crane at the Marquette Companies White Oak apartments. He was told he would transfer over to his new job around Jan-March. He was also the operator at the Allen project on the taller crane and the tower crane operator at the Hanover River Oaks. Only building that qualifies in that height range is the one at Hanover Autry Park.
Sure enough, permitting appears to have gone out per the COH database for a residential tower of at least 40 stories.





Renderings of at least a "placeholder" tower c/o CBRE



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  #12800  
Old Posted Nov 23, 2022, 3:13 PM
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1934 West Gray

A few blocks south of Autry Park (and Regent Square) at West Gray & Woodhead, an existing 4-story Chase Bank building may not be long for this world.

Circled from a rendering in the previous post



Current structure on site, looking back toward Autry Park



Renderings from Urbannizer on HAIF via the COH Planning & Development Department.





It is on the agenda for the December 1st meeting of the Planning Commission.
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Last edited by Wattleigh; Nov 23, 2022 at 3:25 PM. Reason: IMG
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