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  #301  
Old Posted Jan 31, 2011, 10:39 PM
Inkoumori Inkoumori is offline
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much better rink downtown

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  #302  
Old Posted Feb 1, 2011, 2:13 AM
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Is that in Stuyvesant's soccer field?
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  #303  
Old Posted Mar 3, 2011, 12:14 AM
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High Line Phase II's Northern End Gets Cut Out
http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2011/0...tion-cut-out-5

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The High Line's Section 2 isn't even open yet, and already we've glimpsed many of its neatest features: the seating steps and the Lawn at 23rd Street, the Woodland Flyover, the Viewing Spur. We could go on. In fact, we will! The latest reveal from the High Line Blog, from which we swiped the images above, is of the 30th Street Cut-Out, at the northern end of Section 2. The cut-out will have a viewing platform with the concrete removed, exposing the 30th Street traffic below through the High Line's steel. Do look down.
Click on the URL for photos!!
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  #304  
Old Posted Mar 24, 2011, 12:11 AM
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Chelsea Market Expansion Unveiled: Offices, Hotel, Anger!
http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2011/0...otel_anger.php

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Swimming in gold coins Scrooge McDuck style after selling a building to Google for $1.9 billion in cold hard cash, developer Jamestown Properties announced a big expansion plan for one of its crown jewels, the Chelsea Market retail/office complex. The historic former Nabisco factory was said to be getting an additional 300,000 or so square feet dropped on top of its old bones if Jamestown gets it way. The developer needs a zoning waiver in order to build so big, so last night the torture porn of public review began with a presentation to a Community Board 4 subcommittee. ArchiTakes was there and has a full report on the proceedings, including renderings (above) shown by Studios Architecture of the two main components. Initial reaction: Holy Ritz!

Seen first is the massive office space addition (nearly 250,000 square feet) on Tenth Avenue, above where the High Line passes through. Writes ArchiTakes, "The design tries to break down its oppressive mass by collage effects which could conceivably be said to take inspiration from the accretive vocabulary of the Chelsea Market complex, although [architect David] Burns didn't seem to have the heart to even bother trying this pitch." Then there's the 90,000-square-foot boutique hotel on the Ninth Avenue side of Chelsea Market, above the restaurant Buddakan. More competition for the Standard, Maritime, Gansevoort and soon-to-open Dream Downtown? Yep, but Jamestown "presented the hotel not as another contribution to the Meatpacking nightclub scene, but as sober support for businesses based in the upper floors of the Market." Um, sure!

One CB4 member called the new stuff downright "ugly" and others questioned the benefits to the community should the Chelsea Market be allowed to mutate. DNAinfo has much more on the crowd's concerns (some people were wearing "Save Chelsea Market" pins), and Jamestown's response. The developer would be paying $50 for every square foot of added space—over $16 million—into the High Line Improvement Fund, and would build a High Line amenities package that includes public restrooms and a new space used for events and education. Friends of the High Line co-founder Joshua David made an appearance to talk about how much the park would benefit from the added revenue. One CB4 member said, "I sort of resent that the High Line is being brought into this and used against us." Cookie time is over, folks. Get ready for a war.






Another Hotel Planned:
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  #305  
Old Posted Mar 25, 2011, 1:07 PM
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The High Line made National Geographic's Picture of the Day...

http://photography.nationalgeographi...11-03-25-02:01



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High Line, New York City

Photograph by Diane Cook and Len Jenshel, National Geographic

This Month in Photo of the Day: National Geographic Magazine Features

An abandoned rail line has become an elevated park known as the High Line. Dense plantings at the southern end heighten the contrast with the old steel structure as well as with the cityscape. The Standard Hotel, one of three buildings that cross over the High Line, is on the right.
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  #306  
Old Posted Mar 26, 2011, 1:57 AM
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The Whitney Museum expansion will be right next to that, inside that fence btw
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  #307  
Old Posted Mar 29, 2011, 9:02 AM
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Before it was transformed into a park, the High Line played a critical role in delivering food to New Yorkers. Listen to historian Patrick Ciccone tell the rich–and often overlooked–story of how food reached New Yorkers, and how the High Line connected the city to a nationwide network of food production and processing.
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  #308  
Old Posted Apr 4, 2011, 5:55 PM
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http://www.latimes.com/entertainment...,3268732.story
Architecture review: HL23 in Manhattan
Los Angeles architect Neil Denari's design yields a West Side building of drama and cunning that rises over the High Line elevated park.




By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
April 4, 2011

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Los Angeles architect Neil Denari's new residential tower on the West Side of Manhattan is a standout building in ways that begin with — but aren't limited to — its gymnastic form.

Known as HL23, for its site where 23rd Street meets the High Line elevated park, the 14-story tower is among the most ambitious of the many buildings spawned by the opening of the wildly popular park in 2009. And in a reversal of the architectural setbacks for which New York has long been famous, HL23 doesn't get narrower as it goes up; it rises from a small footprint in the shadow of the High Line and grows opportunistically wider, so that portions of its upper half lean out over the park itself.

But the most surprising thing about the building is how it turns on its ear one of the most stubborn assumptions about the differences between architecture in New York and in Los Angeles. It used to be that for young, experimental or otherwise untested architects, L.A. was the place to get an unorthodox design built. In New York, on the other hand, opportunities for those architects tended to be limited to residential or commercial interiors that had no impact on the skyline.

...For all its dynamism, precision and intelligence, there has always been something a bit antiseptic about Denari's work, as if it were hermetically sealed against emotion as well as imperfection. The New York building, with its fluid, digitally derived profile and facade of glass and panels of embossed stainless steel, won't dramatically change that impression. Its design personality is closer to robotic than balletic.

But the design has without a doubt yielded a building of drama and cunning — particularly in its relationship with the High Line. Thanks in part to seven separate zoning waivers from New York's planning commission, which sanctioned its unusual bulging form, HL23 behaves like a flower planted along the park's underside that manages to grow up and out over its urban host. That connects it in spirit with the small number of other Manhattan buildings that either lean out over public space or grow wider as they rise, including Marcel Breuer's Whitney Museum, from 1966, and Raimund Abraham's 2002 Austrian Cultural Forum.

The tower's visual prominence — along with the Standard Hotel a bit farther south by Todd Schliemann of Ennead Architects, it is the only building allowed by the city to occupy the airspace above the High Line — means that users of the park will be able to consider it at a distance and up close and from a number of angles. Denari took full advantage of that visibility, crafting complex elevations on the north, south and east sides of the building (to the west it shares a wall with an earlier building by Lindy Roy) that give the design a shifting, even mercurial aesthetic personality. There are perspectives from which HL23 seems to shrink as it grows, while from others the way that the apartments become larger on the upper floors is easy to grasp.
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  #309  
Old Posted Apr 5, 2011, 1:59 PM
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“Office buildings are our factories – whether for tech, creative or traditional industries we must continue to grow our modern factories to create new jobs,” said United States Senator Chuck Schumer.
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  #310  
Old Posted Apr 11, 2011, 11:15 PM
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Didn't know where else to put this, but demolition has officially begun for the new Whitney Museum at the south end of the High Line. Unfortunately I didnt get a photo, but it's certainly something to keep an eye on.
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  #311  
Old Posted Apr 12, 2011, 9:23 PM
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Originally Posted by yankeesfan1000 View Post
Didn't know where else to put this, but demolition has officially begun for the new Whitney Museum at the south end of the High Line. Unfortunately I didnt get a photo, but it's certainly something to keep an eye on.
Yes it is because I believe it will actually be part of the High Line. Great news.
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  #312  
Old Posted Apr 12, 2011, 11:35 PM
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HL23 reminds me of the cockpit of the Millennium Falcon.

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  #313  
Old Posted Apr 15, 2011, 2:51 PM
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http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2011/0...commission.php

Twisty MePa Tower Gets a Little Love From Landmarks Commission



The original plan (L.) and the revised design from Morris Adjmi Architects.

Thursday, April 14, 2011, by Pete Davies

Quote:
Last November, when developer Taconic Investment Partners first presented a plan for a torquing tower in steel and glass at the edge of the Gansevoort Market Historic District, members of the Landmarks Preservation Commission almost fell in love. They called architect Morris Adjmi's design for 837 Washington Street handsome and powerful. But ultimately the commissioners backed off, declaring it a bit too big and bold, and sent the development and design team away with the promise of a second date.

Now the time has come, so Adjmi (a popular choice these days) and Taconic returned to the Commission chambers this week to present a revised design. What they showed is 29 feet and two stories shorter than the original scheme, but it's still a twisting assemblage of stacked horizontal elements fronted in glass and wrapped in a steel exo-skeleton, all rising from the old 2-story moderne-influenced market building that's been on this corner since 1938.

Is it meaty enough?

The commissioners' responses to the truncated tower ranged from praise to...utter confusion. Some saw the design as a perfect example of our times and the neighborhood, expressing the marriage of high fashion to downtown edginess. Others found it too exuberant, overly glassy and simply too tall for its historic neighbors.

To woo the decision makers, the design team showed images of the jumble of buildings that sat on this corner at West 13th and Washington 80 years ago, nearly as tall as the vertical addition they want to build now. Some commissioners were won over, but not all. The two sides agreed to meet again. Will they finally see some action on the third date?



















The old version (top left) and the new truncated plan.



See through from the High Line.



From the High Line at night (Morris Adjmi Architects).















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  #314  
Old Posted Apr 15, 2011, 4:15 PM
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that is one complicated-looking building
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  #315  
Old Posted Jun 7, 2011, 7:35 PM
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get down there now evreybody -- section II opened early an hour or so ago - i was all over it and it is awesome - stay tuned for pics!
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  #316  
Old Posted Jun 7, 2011, 7:41 PM
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A good NYTimes article about the spinoff benefits of the High Line from yesterday.
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  #317  
Old Posted Jun 8, 2011, 1:34 AM
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soft opening this afternoon -- at long last -- presenting section II













































































































*** official grand opening is tomorrow ***

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  #318  
Old Posted Jun 8, 2011, 4:08 AM
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This is just the first step in a long-delayed path toward truly vertical cities - urban environments where the public space is as vertical as the private. I hope NY doesn't stop with with its current plans for the High Line: I hope they extend it throughout Manhattan, build it to whole new heights in multiple tiers, and show leadership for the whole world.
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  #319  
Old Posted Jun 8, 2011, 8:30 AM
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The Highline is seriously amazing, every city should use it as a model to make use of their old rail lines and such that are no longer in use. Its seriously one of the most exciting urban projects going on in the the US right now.
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  #320  
Old Posted Jun 8, 2011, 8:52 AM
aquablue aquablue is offline
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Originally Posted by Troubadour View Post
This is just the first step in a long-delayed path toward truly vertical cities - urban environments where the public space is as vertical as the private. I hope NY doesn't stop with with its current plans for the High Line: I hope they extend it throughout Manhattan, build it to whole new heights in multiple tiers, and show leadership for the whole world.
You can dream all you like, but multiple tiers will never happen in NYC. Actually, you are just dreaming if you think they will build the high line throughout manhattan. This isn't architecture studio class. The only chance you have is if they turned the elevated freeways into a new highline (unlikely).

Try somewhere else for your audacious dreams. I.e, some new city somwhere where such things could be possible, not in NYC which is under strict control of NIMBIES. No one would tolerate multiple tiers blocking light and more overhead structures ruining the street level experience on NY's narrow canyons. This is not something that will spread around, get it? This isn't Couruscant or Blade Runner here. This is NYC which is hardly the most progressive city when it comes to innovative urban design and is very reticent to change the classic look of the city (that is, a city of traffic). Wake me up when NY has it's equivalent of Nanjing Road or a European equivalent. If it can't even accomplish that, pedestrian bridges and vertical level platforms are just sci-fi fantasy.

Last edited by aquablue; Jun 8, 2011 at 9:07 AM.
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