HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForum About
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Global Projects & Construction > General Development


Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #51561  
Old Posted Nov 23, 2022, 4:14 PM
west-town-brad west-town-brad is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 834
Quote:
Originally Posted by thegoatman View Post
Eh, this depends on the street. Streets that are mini highways like Western, Ashland, Cicero, etc. will of course have empty storefronts. But go visit the more intimate walkable streets like Southport, Damen, and Clark and most of the retail is filled.
you are 100% correct, yet our zoning code/policy is pretty much one size fits all streets.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #51562  
Old Posted Nov 23, 2022, 9:49 PM
thegoatman thegoatman is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2021
Posts: 634
https://chicagoyimby.com/2022/11/cad...-district.html

Is it just me or does the whole IMD area feel like it has MASSIVE potential but its failing to hit that peak? This tower is...just okay and I just seen they completed this Hampton Inn there which is absolutely awful, looks like it belongs in Schaumberg or something. I feel like this area could be the country's premier medical district along with TMC in Houston and could really revitalize that section of the west side, but they're going along developing the area incorrectly.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #51563  
Old Posted Nov 23, 2022, 10:46 PM
marothisu marothisu is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Manhattan
Posts: 6,487
Quote:
Originally Posted by thegoatman View Post
https://chicagoyimby.com/2022/11/cad...-district.html

Is it just me or does the whole IMD area feel like it has MASSIVE potential but its failing to hit that peak? This tower is...just okay and I just seen they completed this Hampton Inn there which is absolutely awful, looks like it belongs in Schaumberg or something. I feel like this area could be the country's premier medical district along with TMC in Houston and could really revitalize that section of the west side, but they're going along developing the area incorrectly.
The IMD is one of my least favorite parts of the entire city. It definitely sucks. They are going to hopefully make it better though. This is from April:

https://www.chicagobusiness.com/comm...id-development
__________________
Chicago Maps:
* New Construction https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer...B0&usp=sharing
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #51564  
Old Posted Nov 23, 2022, 10:56 PM
ardecila's Avatar
ardecila ardecila is offline
TL;DR
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: the city o'wind
Posts: 15,933
Quote:
Originally Posted by thegoatman View Post
https://chicagoyimby.com/2022/11/cad...-district.html

Is it just me or does the whole IMD area feel like it has MASSIVE potential but its failing to hit that peak? This tower is...just okay and I just seen they completed this Hampton Inn there which is absolutely awful, looks like it belongs in Schaumberg or something. I feel like this area could be the country's premier medical district along with TMC in Houston and could really revitalize that section of the west side, but they're going along developing the area incorrectly.
What do you think Houston is doing at TMC, that Chicago isn't doing? The TMC is just big and dense. It's not particularly urban or walkable. The recent growth around IMD seems exactly like the stuff going up around TMC. They can't decide if they want to be a city neighborhood or a college campus, important sites are kept vacant for future growth, and the buildings they do have are severely coarse-grained, designed without much attention to the streetscape or the pedestrian experience.

Quote:
Originally Posted by BrinChi View Post
Maybe retail spaces need to be more flexible... so that ETSY shop owners and other small business owners can do rotating popups. No policy is going to be perfect, and there will always be loopholes, but with the growing levels of vacancies it seems that the current order of things must change. We just can't let new retail sit empty for years on end in otherwise vibrant neighborhoods.
Hard to encourage popups when it takes 6 months just to get a building permit. When you do see a popup, usually they are built without permits. Sometimes that is legal, sometimes not. But the risk of an inspector slapping a stop work order is not exactly encouraging to anyone looking to do a popup.
__________________
la forme d'une ville change plus vite, hélas! que le coeur d'un mortel...
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #51565  
Old Posted Nov 28, 2022, 2:42 PM
migueltorres's Avatar
migueltorres migueltorres is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Chicago
Posts: 287
Didn't see this posted here so here you go:

Quote:
Double Door Gets Approval To Add Marquee To New Uptown Home, With Opening Eyed For Next Year




https://blockclubchicago.org/2022/11...for-next-year/
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #51566  
Old Posted Nov 29, 2022, 1:44 AM
thegoatman thegoatman is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2021
Posts: 634


Need buildings of this magnitude near every L station, not suburban style mcdonalds, parking lots, and strip malls.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #51567  
Old Posted Nov 29, 2022, 1:55 AM
Steely Dan's Avatar
Steely Dan Steely Dan is online now
devout Pizzatarian
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Lincoln Square, Chicago
Posts: 27,452
Quote:
Originally Posted by thegoatman View Post

Need buildings of this magnitude near every L station, not suburban style mcdonalds, parking lots, and strip malls.
QFT

at every L stop.

in every neighborhood.


is there any city with a legacy rapid transit system that allows as much suburban-ass crap nextdoor to its train stations as chicago does?
__________________
"every time a strip mall dies, an angel gets its wings"
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #51568  
Old Posted Nov 29, 2022, 1:28 PM
thegoatman thegoatman is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2021
Posts: 634
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steely Dan View Post
QFT

at every L stop.

in every neighborhood.


is there any city with a legacy rapid transit system that allows as much suburban-ass crap nextdoor to its train stations as chicago does?
Even in the downtown area, the city institutes shitty land usage near stations. No way a Mcdonalds that look like it belongs in Orland Park should have been allowed to be built right next to the Grand/Chicago red line subway stop.

Now a city that does TOD right? DC. Even in suburban VA, there's tons of good infill development near every station. Here are some examples.

https://www.google.com/maps/@38.8828...8i6656!5m1!1e2

https://www.google.com/maps/@38.8871...8i8192!5m1!1e2

https://www.google.com/maps/@38.9111...8i6656!5m1!1e2

2/3 of these are in suburban Arlington. Notice the mix of high rises, mid rises, and dense infill.

Now lets do Chicago...

https://www.google.com/maps/@41.8911...8i8192!5m1!1e2

https://www.google.com/maps/@41.9035...8i8192!5m1!1e2

https://www.google.com/maps/@41.9166...8i8192!5m1!1e2


Now I picked prime real estate blue line neighborhoods to show. If I were to show the orange line or green line stops you would see nothing but vacant lots and parking lots. Now is it the worst? No, but compare these 3 to the one I shown for the DC area, not even touching it. Every single L stop needs to be upzoned asap. Love this city but it needs the right leadership to realize its true potential, especially transit wise. Strip malls, drive thrus, and parking lots should be banned anywhere within a mile of an L station.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #51569  
Old Posted Nov 29, 2022, 1:34 PM
thegoatman thegoatman is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2021
Posts: 634






Shoutout to Bronzeville tho for building correct multifamily dense infill near L stations
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #51570  
Old Posted Nov 29, 2022, 1:46 PM
glowrock's Avatar
glowrock glowrock is offline
Becoming Chicago-fied!
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Chicago (West Avondale)
Posts: 19,634
Quote:
Originally Posted by thegoatman View Post
Even in the downtown area, the city institutes shitty land usage near stations. No way a Mcdonalds that look like it belongs in Orland Park should have been allowed to be built right next to the Grand/Chicago red line subway stop.

Now a city that does TOD right? DC. Even in suburban VA, there's tons of good infill development near every station. Here are some examples.

https://www.google.com/maps/@38.8828...8i6656!5m1!1e2

https://www.google.com/maps/@38.8871...8i8192!5m1!1e2

https://www.google.com/maps/@38.9111...8i6656!5m1!1e2

2/3 of these are in suburban Arlington. Notice the mix of high rises, mid rises, and dense infill.

Now lets do Chicago...

https://www.google.com/maps/@41.8911...8i8192!5m1!1e2

https://www.google.com/maps/@41.9035...8i8192!5m1!1e2

https://www.google.com/maps/@41.9166...8i8192!5m1!1e2


Now I picked prime real estate blue line neighborhoods to show. If I were to show the orange line or green line stops you would see nothing but vacant lots and parking lots. Now is it the worst? No, but compare these 3 to the one I shown for the DC area, not even touching it. Every single L stop needs to be upzoned asap. Love this city but it needs the right leadership to realize its true potential, especially transit wise. Strip malls, drive thrus, and parking lots should be banned anywhere within a mile of an L station.
While I agree with you about upzoning, you're failing to understand that the Milwaukee Ave corridor never had much in the way of highrises, always a pretty dense commercial low to midrise corridor. As you already know, of course, the areas around Grand and Chicago are rapidly densifying. Damen/North is already very commercially dense, Western is rapidly getting much better, etc... Division/Ashland definitely needs work, no doubt about it.

Aaron (Glowrock)
__________________
"Deeply corrupt but still semi-functional - it's the Chicago way." -- Barrelfish
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #51571  
Old Posted Nov 29, 2022, 2:09 PM
west-town-brad west-town-brad is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2014
Posts: 834
Quote:
Originally Posted by thegoatman View Post
Even in the downtown area, the city institutes shitty land usage near stations. No way a Mcdonalds that look like it belongs in Orland Park should have been allowed to be built right next to the Grand/Chicago red line subway stop.

Now a city that does TOD right? DC. Even in suburban VA, there's tons of good infill development near every station. Here are some examples.

https://www.google.com/maps/@38.8828...8i6656!5m1!1e2

https://www.google.com/maps/@38.8871...8i8192!5m1!1e2

https://www.google.com/maps/@38.9111...8i6656!5m1!1e2

2/3 of these are in suburban Arlington. Notice the mix of high rises, mid rises, and dense infill.

Now lets do Chicago...

https://www.google.com/maps/@41.8911...8i8192!5m1!1e2

https://www.google.com/maps/@41.9035...8i8192!5m1!1e2

https://www.google.com/maps/@41.9166...8i8192!5m1!1e2


Now I picked prime real estate blue line neighborhoods to show. If I were to show the orange line or green line stops you would see nothing but vacant lots and parking lots. Now is it the worst? No, but compare these 3 to the one I shown for the DC area, not even touching it. Every single L stop needs to be upzoned asap. Love this city but it needs the right leadership to realize its true potential, especially transit wise. Strip malls, drive thrus, and parking lots should be banned anywhere within a mile of an L station.
Comparing those Chicago locations with just a few years ago is like night and day in terms of density.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #51572  
Old Posted Nov 29, 2022, 2:16 PM
marothisu marothisu is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Manhattan
Posts: 6,487
LOL @ Arlington, VA being "suburban Virginia". That's like saying Hoboken, Union City, or Jersey City is "suburban New Jersey." There are multiple census tracts in Arlington County that are 50K+ ppsm and even a few over 70K ppsm. There's even a tract there pushing 100K ppsm. And it's not something new of the last 5 years. And you'd know this if you are familiar with Arlington for over a decade. it's been dense in various places for years.

But I do agree, there's some shitty land use near downtown. But knowing the history of the entire area kind of helps to put things in perspective. I don't know why people act as if these areas were built up or something. Chicago has come a long way in the downtown area really. Parts of River North 40+ years ago literally looked like parts of Elston Ave do today.

1972 Orleans & Kinzie River North
https://chicagohistorytoday.files.wo...-40-kinzie.jpg

Same spot, 2021
https://chicagohistorytoday.files.wo...022.jpg?w=1024


1976 River North:
https://pbs.twimg.com/media/ClF4CUFV...g&name=900x900

All things considered, it's been a pretty crazy transformation compared to 40 or 50 years ago in these areas downtown. even the last decade. Back a decade ago this was Clark & Chestnut close to a transit stop:
https://www.google.com/maps/@41.8978...7i13312!8i6656

And late 2021:
https://www.google.com/maps/@41.8978...7i16384!8i8192


The amount of erasure of industrial sites and parking lots downtown in Chicago is actually quite amazing if you know what it used to be like in River North, Streeterville, etc.
__________________
Chicago Maps:
* New Construction https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer...B0&usp=sharing

Last edited by marothisu; Nov 29, 2022 at 2:37 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #51573  
Old Posted Nov 29, 2022, 4:45 PM
ardecila's Avatar
ardecila ardecila is offline
TL;DR
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: the city o'wind
Posts: 15,933
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steely Dan View Post
QFT

at every L stop.

in every neighborhood.


is there any city with a legacy rapid transit system that allows as much suburban-ass crap nextdoor to its train stations as chicago does?
The most recent revisions to the zoning code enforce P-Streets design standards within 1/2 mile around all rail stations in the city (CTA and Metra). Driveways/curb cuts are banned, blank walls are discouraged, buildings must come up to the street, etc. This doesn't eliminate the "suburban-ass crap" that already exists, but it does make it difficult to renovate or rebuild, or to add new suburban-ass crap.

This is a no-brainer around most of our train stations, but where it gets interesting are the many L stops in expressway medians. The Dan Ryan especially is lined with suburban crap. I don't see a way for any of that to get built now. That's a good thing, but I don't know what other land use makes sense. It's only a matter of time until people begin to complain that they can't build a gas station/strip mall or expand a church parking lot. In several other cases, P-street designations have been (temporarily) repealed to allow for expansions of McDonalds or other fast food restaurants. The new rules seem a little harder to bend, but if there's a way, aldermen will find it...
__________________
la forme d'une ville change plus vite, hélas! que le coeur d'un mortel...
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #51574  
Old Posted Nov 29, 2022, 5:02 PM
Steely Dan's Avatar
Steely Dan Steely Dan is online now
devout Pizzatarian
 
Join Date: Jul 2001
Location: Lincoln Square, Chicago
Posts: 27,452
Quote:
Originally Posted by ardecila View Post
The most recent revisions to the zoning code enforce P-Streets design standards within 1/2 mile around all rail stations in the city (CTA and Metra). Driveways/curb cuts are banned, blank walls are discouraged, buildings must come up to the street, etc.
there must be some bend on the bolded, because the new affordable housing development proposal up here in lincoln square next to the western brown line stop is still going to have curb cuts to access the parking garage that's included with the project.

yes, overall, it's obviously LIGHT YEARS better than the surface parking lot currently occupying the space, but curb cuts are still curb cuts, and they always make sidewalks shittier.
__________________
"every time a strip mall dies, an angel gets its wings"
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #51575  
Old Posted Nov 29, 2022, 5:26 PM
urbanpln urbanpln is offline
urbanpln
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: chicago
Posts: 279
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steely Dan View Post
QFT

is there any city with a legacy rapid transit system that allows as much suburban-ass crap nextdoor to its train stations as chicago does?
I believe the City of San Francisco and Oakland have some of the same issues.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #51576  
Old Posted Nov 29, 2022, 5:44 PM
Randomguy34's Avatar
Randomguy34 Randomguy34 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Apr 2013
Location: Chicago & Philly
Posts: 1,895
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steely Dan View Post
there must be some bend on the bolded, because the new affordable housing development proposal up here in lincoln square next to the western brown line stop is still going to have curb cuts to access the parking garage that's included with the project.
The bend is that a developer can request the zoning administrator through the "administrative adjustment" process to forego the requirements. While this means the requirement is not as absolute as it could be, it does make pedestrian-oriented developments the norm rather than the exception.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #51577  
Old Posted Nov 29, 2022, 6:02 PM
ardecila's Avatar
ardecila ardecila is offline
TL;DR
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: the city o'wind
Posts: 15,933
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steely Dan View Post
there must be some bend on the bolded, because the new affordable housing development proposal up here in lincoln square next to the western brown line stop is still going to have curb cuts to access the parking garage that's included with the project.

yes, overall, it's obviously LIGHT YEARS better than the surface parking lot currently occupying the space, but curb cuts are still curb cuts, and they always make sidewalks shittier.
It is available as an administrative adjustment. Practically that means you either need DPD planning staff to agree that a curb cut is needed, or you need the mayor to step in. Individual aldermen don't have much sway.

For Western/Leland, the project was intensely negotiated by DPD staff, so they must have agreed to the administrative adjustment as part of the compromise. Originally they did want the curb cut off the alley.

For land along the Dan Ryan, they may agree to adjustments there too, but they can't roll it back entirely so it still won't be the usual suburban crap. Strip malls, gas stations, etc will all need to adjust their site plans and building designs to be more urban-friendly.
__________________
la forme d'une ville change plus vite, hélas! que le coeur d'un mortel...
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #51578  
Old Posted Nov 29, 2022, 7:52 PM
pip's Avatar
pip pip is online now
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Boston
Posts: 4,069
Quote:
Originally Posted by marothisu View Post
LOL @ Arlington, VA being "suburban Virginia". That's like saying Hoboken, Union City, or Jersey City is "suburban New Jersey." There are multiple census tracts in Arlington County that are 50K+ ppsm and even a few over 70K ppsm. There's even a tract there pushing 100K ppsm. And it's not something new of the last 5 years. And you'd know this if you are familiar with Arlington for over a decade. it's been dense in various places for years.

But I do agree, there's some shitty land use near downtown. But knowing the history of the entire area kind of helps to put things in perspective. I don't know why people act as if these areas were built up or something. Chicago has come a long way in the downtown area really. Parts of River North 40+ years ago literally looked like parts of Elston Ave do today.

1972 Orleans & Kinzie River North
https://chicagohistorytoday.files.wo...-40-kinzie.jpg

Same spot, 2021
https://chicagohistorytoday.files.wo...022.jpg?w=1024


1976 River North:
https://pbs.twimg.com/media/ClF4CUFV...g&name=900x900

All things considered, it's been a pretty crazy transformation compared to 40 or 50 years ago in these areas downtown. even the last decade. Back a decade ago this was Clark & Chestnut close to a transit stop:
https://www.google.com/maps/@41.8978...7i13312!8i6656

And late 2021:
https://www.google.com/maps/@41.8978...7i16384!8i8192


The amount of erasure of industrial sites and parking lots downtown in Chicago is actually quite amazing if you know what it used to be like in River North, Streeterville, etc.
Thanks for the link! Im going to be on this tonight https://chicagohistorytoday.wordpress.com/
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #51579  
Old Posted Yesterday, 5:07 AM
BVictor1's Avatar
BVictor1 BVictor1 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Chicago
Posts: 10,111
Discuss the future of vacant City land near the Kedzie Green Line station

At 6 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 6, when DPD will introduce three teams competing to redevelop the site with transit-oriented uses.

Register and submit ideas at the project website: https://wewillchicago.com/east-garfi...ity-engagement




https://www.chicago.gov/content/dam/...Kedzie_RFQ.pdf
__________________
titanic1
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #51580  
Old Posted Today, 6:28 AM
BVictor1's Avatar
BVictor1 BVictor1 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Chicago
Posts: 10,111
1020 W. Randolph

11.28.22




__________________
titanic1
Reply With Quote
     
     
End
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Global Projects & Construction > General Development
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 2:31 PM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2022, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.