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  #22641  
Old Posted Yesterday, 5:05 PM
3rd&Brown 3rd&Brown is offline
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Originally Posted by cardeza View Post
thats true but they also know if they dont act know they are sidelined for another 8 years. The fact so many are jumping in means they all feel there is no clear frontrunner. Philly government gives a lot of power to the mayor so if you want to make big changes its hard to do it from Council. I wont be surprised if some of these folks run for other offices in the future if they lose the nomination.
Huh?

Philadelphia has a weak-mayor form of government, particularly in comparison to other big cities. What little power the mayor does have is further weakend by the state.

If anything, I'd say Council's power is larger in Philly compared to other jurisdictions.
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  #22642  
Old Posted Yesterday, 6:46 PM
allovertown allovertown is offline
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Originally Posted by 3rd&Brown View Post
Huh?

Philadelphia has a weak-mayor form of government, particularly in comparison to other big cities. What little power the mayor does have is further weakend by the state.

If anything, I'd say Council's power is larger in Philly compared to other jurisdictions.
Completely agree. In fact, considering how powerful Councilmanic prerogative is, I think it's pretty easy to make the argument that not only is the totality of city council obviously more powerful than the mayor, but also that each City Council member has greater control over their own district than the mayor.

Mayor is a more prestigious job. You're able to make press and set an agenda in a way you can't as a council member. If you have greater political ambitions, it's better job to have on your resume. But in terms of pure power it's hard to argue any of these retiring council members would wield significantly greater power as mayor. Maybe it's more of an upgrade for at large members like Domb, but still.
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  #22643  
Old Posted Yesterday, 9:50 PM
ScreamShatter ScreamShatter is offline
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^ All I know is many of these candidates are no bueno. After 4 years of Kenny, we cannot afford another dud.
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  #22644  
Old Posted Yesterday, 10:01 PM
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mcgrath618 mcgrath618 is offline
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^ All I know is many of these candidates are no bueno. After 4 years of Kenny, we cannot afford another dud.
Rhynheart, Domb, or Green would be preferable.
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  #22645  
Old Posted Yesterday, 10:09 PM
McBane McBane is offline
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Originally Posted by allovertown View Post
Completely agree. In fact, considering how powerful Councilmanic prerogative is, I think it's pretty easy to make the argument that not only is the totality of city council obviously more powerful than the mayor, but also that each City Council member has greater control over their own district than the mayor.

Mayor is a more prestigious job. You're able to make press and set an agenda in a way you can't as a council member. If you have greater political ambitions, it's better job to have on your resume. But in terms of pure power it's hard to argue any of these retiring council members would wield significantly greater power as mayor. Maybe it's more of an upgrade for at large members like Domb, but still.
Agree with this except the bold part. Pennsylvanians dislike Philadelphia and for the mayor of this town to become governor (or any other statewide office) is anathema, particularly for rural voters (and I get they vote mostly Republican but you need to carry some of these voters). More substantially, the policies and political stances needed to be elected mayor of Philly stands stands in stark contrast with what's needed to win a PA general election. Of course, if someone cut from the Rendell cloth (like Domb or Brown) can become mayor and govern as a centrist, show that they're tough on crime (this is the most challenging thing for big city mayors), and improve the business climate, those are accomplishments that can carry over into a successful statewide election. But again, those stances likely won't help a candidate move past the mayoral primary. It's a bit of catch-22 although Philly isn't a special case here. Lots of big city mayors don't go on to do anything else for those same reasons (but keep an eye out for Eric Adams).
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  #22646  
Old Posted Yesterday, 10:36 PM
3rd&Brown 3rd&Brown is offline
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Originally Posted by ScreamShatter View Post
^ All I know is many of these candidates are no bueno. After 4 years of Kenny, we cannot afford another dud.
This is a rather pessimistic view.

This the best prospective class of candidates we've had in decades.

People begged Kenney to run because there were few other alternatives (T Milton Street, rip).

We lucked out with Nutter. He was by no means a shoe-in. Further, in that cycle, he was the only good candidate.

We have 3, arguably 4 people that would be fantastic mayors. I'm just hoping that some fluke doesn't bring the weaker candidates to the front of the pack.
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  #22647  
Old Posted Yesterday, 10:40 PM
3rd&Brown 3rd&Brown is offline
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Originally Posted by McBane View Post
Of course, if someone cut from the Rendell cloth (like Domb or Brown) can become mayor and govern as a centrist, show that they're tough on crime (this is the most challenging thing for big city mayors), and improve the business climate, those are accomplishments that can carry over into a successful statewide election.
I'm personally hoping for Rhynhart or Green.

It's time for generational change. No more old people in politics.
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  #22648  
Old Posted Yesterday, 11:19 PM
ScreamShatter ScreamShatter is offline
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Originally Posted by 3rd&Brown View Post
This is a rather pessimistic view.

This the best prospective class of candidates we've had in decades.

People begged Kenney to run because there were few other alternatives (T Milton Street, rip).

We lucked out with Nutter. He was by no means a shoe-in. Further, in that cycle, he was the only good candidate.

We have 3, arguably 4 people that would be fantastic mayors. I'm just hoping that some fluke doesn't bring the weaker candidates to the front of the pack.
There are 2 candidates that are or may run I’m very excited about. All the others would be absolute disasters. Calling it like it is.
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  #22649  
Old Posted Yesterday, 11:24 PM
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iheartphilly iheartphilly is offline
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hopefully it's a 2 to 1 favorite on Rhynhart. Looks like she could actually shake things up. If so, Philly will have a moment and a turning point in its history.

Good write-up here:
https://thephiladelphiacitizen.org/r...-philadelphia/
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  #22650  
Old Posted Today, 1:13 AM
ScreamShatter ScreamShatter is offline
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Originally Posted by iheartphilly View Post
hopefully it's a 2 to 1 favorite on Rhynhart. Looks like she could actually shake things up. If so, Philly will have a moment and a turning point in its history.

Good write-up here:
https://thephiladelphiacitizen.org/r...-philadelphia/
She’s my top pick by a long shot for exactly the reason you say: I think she’d shake things up and fix/reform a lot of departments. She’s proven to be independent-minded and pragmatic. Many of the people running are ideologues and I’m concerned they’d implement policies more on polling or hardline party stances rather than truly what’s needed to fix the issues.
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  #22651  
Old Posted Today, 2:28 AM
allovertown allovertown is offline
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Originally Posted by McBane View Post
Agree with this except the bold part. Pennsylvanians dislike Philadelphia and for the mayor of this town to become governor (or any other statewide office) is anathema, particularly for rural voters (and I get they vote mostly Republican but you need to carry some of these voters). More substantially, the policies and political stances needed to be elected mayor of Philly stands stands in stark contrast with what's needed to win a PA general election. Of course, if someone cut from the Rendell cloth (like Domb or Brown) can become mayor and govern as a centrist, show that they're tough on crime (this is the most challenging thing for big city mayors), and improve the business climate, those are accomplishments that can carry over into a successful statewide election. But again, those stances likely won't help a candidate move past the mayoral primary. It's a bit of catch-22 although Philly isn't a special case here. Lots of big city mayors don't go on to do anything else for those same reasons (but keep an eye out for Eric Adams).
Just because most mayors don't go on to hold higher offices, doesn't mean what I said isn't true. Becoming mayor elevates your profile and name recognition. In the past few decades only Rendell went on to a higher office. But what higher offices have former city council members gone on to hold when they didn't first go on to become mayor?

It's not a sure thing obviously, but a former mayor of Philadelphia has a much greater chance of being elected a governor or a senator than a former city council member.

Also you think Eric Adams is going to go on to greater success? He's been terrible. An absolute disaster with approval ratings in the 20s. Why exactly is he someone to keep an eye on? Or is a draconian and ineffective stance on crime issues the only thing you look for in a candidate?
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