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Old Posted Dec 3, 2020, 6:57 PM
PHLtoNYC PHLtoNYC is offline
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Originally Posted by DudeGuy View Post
I'm all for large low-rise projects, but do either of these developments have a retail component? If not, the developers may as well be building suburban townhouses that require residents to drive elsewhere to do anything. I don't think the city should be allowing/encouraging this type of development as it's antithetical to the existing land use patterns throughout the city. If we have more residents driving cars then we're going to need more grocery stores/retail with parking. It would be a lot better if residents of these huge developments had places to walk to within their own neighborhoods/developments.
The Capri drive project does not and its not anything great in person. That could have easily been oriented to access Penrose Ave and allow for retail frontage on a very dead stretch of roadway. Instead its mediocrity...

At least the pier project has a few retail spaces.
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  #14642  
Old Posted Dec 3, 2020, 7:49 PM
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mcgrath618 mcgrath618 is online now
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Does anyone have the site plan of the full University Place project?
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  #14643  
Old Posted Yesterday, 1:48 PM
PhiLaw PhiLaw is offline
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Originally Posted by cardeza View Post
wow at the south philly project. Never heard of that.
Yes I'm from here/live here. There are a few multi-unit projects down here actually. One on 19th/Geary behind the Catholic Church, one up St Monica's next to the Shoprite, a recently announced project also up st Monica's on 18th/Oregon, and the Siena Homes build-out. The parents aren't happy about it (they think the "skinny jeans people are invading"), but my guess is it's born-and-bred SP young people leaving their parents' row homes (at 29).
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  #14644  
Old Posted Yesterday, 2:57 PM
Justin7 Justin7 is offline
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Originally Posted by Urbanthusiat View Post
These are both terrible retail locations - especially in this economy. There's virtually zero foot traffic in either spot. Not sure any tenants would want to be there.
I think the point is that adding 900 residential units will increase the viability of retail. The question isn't "who would want to go there?" it's "how would 900 residential units not be able to support a cafe?"

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I just snipped it
Thank you.
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  #14645  
Old Posted Yesterday, 3:48 PM
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DudeGuy DudeGuy is offline
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I think the point is that adding 900 residential units will increase the viability of retail. The question isn't "who would want to go there?" it's "how would 900 residential units not be able to support a cafe?"

Yeah this is exactly what I'm talking about. The developers are essentially building an entirely new neighborhood with limited neighborhood amenities. All this does is increase the pressure on surrounding commercial developments to cater to people who get there by car.
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  #14646  
Old Posted Today, 12:18 AM
3rd&Brown 3rd&Brown is online now
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Originally Posted by Justin7 View Post
I think the point is that adding 900 residential units will increase the viability of retail. The question isn't "who would want to go there?" it's "how would 900 residential units not be able to support a cafe?"



Thank you.
Not to mention, there is development happening up and down Delaware Avenue without Retail so this will potentially serve as an anchor for those developments as well. (And when you look at the surrounding plots, it's easy to imagine similar development following quickly).

Unlike other "neighborhoods" that have been built on the river, this will be totally open to the outside (i.e. not gated) with a true street grid, public spaces, and an extension of the Delaware River trail.

I think it's going to be a success.
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