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  #17581  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2020, 9:31 PM
prokowave prokowave is offline
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Originally Posted by ardecila View Post
Do it all, and then some. Sucks that we can't pedestrianize the entire Quarter, but the city really doesn't have the transit system in place to let residents live their lives without cars.

I agree Orleans is a weird choice, though, I assume the intention is to lure tourists from Jackson Square up to Armstrong Park and businesses on Rampart? I think St Ann would be a better choice though, it's not blocked by the cathedral and it has the big lit Armstrong archway at the other end. If it's successful you could even use it to lure people further into the Treme, with something like the Freedom Trail in Boston.

Also I wouldn't close Iberville even after 5pm, it has too many loading docks and garage entrances... Bienville is a better pedestrian street to close.
Btw, I think you put the wrong link. Here's the article

Orleans is probably just a pick of the lowest hanging fruit. In my experience it usually has little or no traffic, so fewer people would complain. I am skeptical about the nightly closures they are proposing - there was a lot of talk about more of those a few years ago and they put in a bunch of bollards and then promptly forgot about them. I say either close a portion permanently or not at all.

Green corridors should be a part of any pedestrian zone. Everyone knows it gets extremely hot in the summer sun and the FQ probably has the fewest trees of any neighborhood. Well designed landscaping would also reduce street flooding.

I think Armstrong park needs to be a big ingredient in this plan. It currently holds the area back. With the tall fencing, few people use it during the day and it is closed at night. Reopening that grid to pedestrians and bikes would help a lot. Right now a third of the space is devoted to parking lots. I'd propose leasing a third of that space to a developer to build housing and use the revenue to build a garage for FQ worker and residents and add more green space. They could also lease some of those buildings for STRs.

The skeleton of a good transit system is already in place, it's just that the number of buses has not kept up with the population/tourism growth. A small fare increase could easily pay for doubling or tripling of service near the quarter. Decatur is a choke point for transit, so a longer term solution would be to pave the riverfront streetcar tracks like the Canal ones so that buses can also use them to avoid traffic.
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  #17582  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2020, 9:52 PM
Blitzen Blitzen is offline
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Originally Posted by prokowave View Post
Btw, I think you put the wrong link. Here's the article

Orleans is probably just a pick of the lowest hanging fruit. In my experience it usually has little or no traffic, so fewer people would complain. I am skeptical about the nightly closures they are proposing - there was a lot of talk about more of those a few years ago and they put in a bunch of bollards and then promptly forgot about them. I say either close a portion permanently or not at all.

Green corridors should be a part of any pedestrian zone. Everyone knows it gets extremely hot in the summer sun and the FQ probably has the fewest trees of any neighborhood. Well designed landscaping would also reduce street flooding.

I think Armstrong park needs to be a big ingredient in this plan. It currently holds the area back. With the tall fencing, few people use it during the day and it is closed at night. Reopening that grid to pedestrians and bikes would help a lot. Right now a third of the space is devoted to parking lots. I'd propose leasing a third of that space to a developer to build housing and use the revenue to build a garage for FQ worker and residents and add more green space. They could also lease some of those buildings for STRs.

The skeleton of a good transit system is already in place, it's just that the number of buses has not kept up with the population/tourism growth. A small fare increase could easily pay for doubling or tripling of service near the quarter. Decatur is a choke point for transit, so a longer term solution would be to pave the riverfront streetcar tracks like the Canal ones so that buses can also use them to avoid traffic.
Those are all great ideas! I’ll add, if the city/French Market Corp ever gets around to developing their lots on Elysian Fields into garages/commercial spaces, that will help the parking situation especially on weekends.
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  #17583  
Old Posted Jul 1, 2020, 10:43 PM
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Originally Posted by prokowave View Post
I am skeptical about the nightly closures they are proposing - there was a lot of talk about more of those a few years ago and they put in a bunch of bollards and then promptly forgot about them.
LOL, that sounds about right. Gotta dedicate a guy to putting up the bollards every day, or put in the motorized kind. Not impossible though.

Does Torres still pay for patrols through the FQ? His guys could do it, lol.
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  #17584  
Old Posted Today, 4:12 AM
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Last edited by tennis1400; Today at 1:14 PM.
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  #17585  
Old Posted Today, 3:01 PM
C. C. is online now
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Originally Posted by sguil1 View Post
Would you use it? New survey examines possible railway connecting Baton Rouge, New Orleans

https://www.theadvocate.com/baton_ro...7f3c9fabd.html

A 2010 study of a possible passenger rail service between Baton Rouge and New Orleans forecasts that 39,000 riders could be zipping between the two Mississippi River cities each month if the train link were opened three years later.

Ridership could rise to 135,000 people per month by 2038 as service was expanded and train speeds increased, the study estimated then.

Ten years after those hopeful forecasts were first offered, University of New Orleans researchers have set up a new online poll to better gauge ridership potential and understand how riders would make it to and from future train stations and their final destinations

I'm skeptical of these types of studies. The ridership numbers are always inflated. Now don't get me wrong, I lived car-free for years, and I'm a big supporter of transit. But I do want to see real numbers of what ridership will be and the cost/benefit analysis. If the government is subsidizing each rider by $20 per ride, it may not be the best investment as there are so many other transit projects that could benefit more people but are passed over.

I would be very interested if there has been a study for transit projects showing projected ridership vs actual ridership when built.

The Atlanta Streetcar which opened in 2016 cost $98 million to build, 3.2 million to operate, and was projected to carry 2,950 riders per day. Fast forward a couple of years to 2018, and average weekday ridership is 973, and annual operating costs are $7.3 million.

http://citycouncil.atlantaga.gov/Hom...cument?id=1168

A one-time capital investment of $308 was spent per annual ride, following by an annual operating cost of $22.95 for each ride. Ridership is on the downtrend since the system opened.

The following quote from this blog sums it up nicely.

Quote:
In the statehouse, legislators have been duking it out over whether to finally actually provide state funding for transit. Georgia is one of just a handful of states that contribute nothing to transit at all. AJC writer Kyle Wingfield worries that the streetcar may be a project that “transit critics will cite for years to come as evidence against expansions of any kind.”

Darin Givens at ATL Urbanist says the city could make the streetcar more useful by spurring walkable development on the many surface parking lots along the route. He criticized the city for failing to adjust land use policies during the two years leading up to the launch of service.
https://usa.streetsblog.org/2015/02/...rs-disappoint/
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