HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForum About
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > United States > Southeast > Atlanta


Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #1  
Old Posted Dec 1, 2022, 5:38 PM
Atlurbsandspices Atlurbsandspices is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2022
Posts: 2
ATL Zoning 2.0

Wondering if anyone attended the zoning 2.0 meeting the other night, an if so, had any manor takeaways or thoughts.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #2  
Old Posted Dec 1, 2022, 8:54 PM
Terminus's Avatar
Terminus Terminus is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 2,250
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atlurbsandspices View Post
Wondering if anyone attended the zoning 2.0 meeting the other night, an if so, had any manor takeaways or thoughts.
Thanks for starting this thread.

I attended. It was a lot of content, but the key takeaway was that the City wants to hear from folks about the types of changes that they'd likely support in the code before they write anything or come up with specific "where" proposals.

They made the workshop virtual and anyone can participated through 12/9:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G2N0VlkNxuI&t=4079s
https://atlzoning.com/meet-and-contribute/

A lot of ideas discussed will interest urbanists, especially the concept of height and FAR reform (e.g. more flexiblity), better parking deck design standards, etc. I love the idea of tailoring standards to where in the city things are too. The city's boundaries are too arbitrary and its land uses too diverse for the same standards everywhere

They need to hear support from folks or I don't know that any of this ideas will progress.
__________________
How about this for the city's slogan:

"Atlanta - it's getting there."
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3  
Old Posted Dec 1, 2022, 10:16 PM
bryantm3 bryantm3 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 664
A lot of the restrictions seem kind of arbitrary (FAR, etc.). Maybe the question should be more, "Does this type of development fit here?" appearance-wise. There are a lot of recently built or remodeled single-family homes I'm thinking about that just don't "fit" the neighborhood and detract from it— think about the ultra-modern homes and McMansions that have started popping up in historic neighborhoods. There ought to be some kind of zoning restriction to stop that. Likewise, as anyone can see in the midtown garden district, duplexes and small apartment buildings can be built to match the surroundings, but aren't allowed in many places just "because".
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #4  
Old Posted Dec 6, 2022, 9:38 PM
galaca galaca is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 909
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #5  
Old Posted Dec 6, 2022, 10:12 PM
ATLonthebrain ATLonthebrain is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Aug 2001
Location: Oakland, CA
Posts: 426
Atlanta limits parking for new Midtown, Downtown projects

Quote:
Originally Posted by galaca View Post
Here's the text from the article:

As momentum builds to restore the core of the city, Atlanta is limiting the amount of parking that can be built for new real estate projects.

On Monday, Atlanta City Council made an amendment to the zoning ordinance by lowering the maximums for off-street parking in Midtown and Downtown, the most walkable and transit-accessible parts of the city. The change is intended to encourage alternatives to driving.

"Parking regulations can promote mode shift, encourage more productive land use, support affordable housing development by reducing parking structure-related expenses, and increase municipal tax revenues," said City Councilmember Jason Dozier, who introduced the legislation, in a post on Twitter. "And it's the right thing to do. We need space for people, not car storage."

The changes include dropping the maximum amount of off-street parking allowed for Downtown office buildings from three spaces per 1,000 square feet down to two spaces. For residential development in Midtown and Downtown, only 1.1 spaces can be built for each one-bedroom unit and 2.1 spaces for units with two or more bedrooms. The former residential maximums allowed up to 1.5 spaces and 2.5 spaces, respectively.


For the most part, the city's zoning regulations do not mandate parking in the city's largest central business districts. But developers often say investors require a set amount of spaces before providing construction loans. In July, Dozier told Atlanta Business Chronicle that he pared back the caps he initially wanted to put in place in light of financing constraints.

Dozier considered the ordinance after early site plans for One Centennial Yards – a set of office towers planned as part of the redevelopment of The Gulch – included more than 1,300 parking spots. The developer is now revising that number of spaces. Land-use and transportation advocates have critiqued the amount of parking at Buckhead, Midtown and Downtown projects, especially when proposed near MARTA stations.

The parking caps coincids with MARTA's efforts to restore ridership, which fell by 30% to 35% over the past decade. The transit agency is rolling out a multi-billion dollar expansion, redesigning its bus network and rehabilitating rail stations to attract and retain riders.

"Just because we build less parking doesn't necessarily mean folks will instantly desire to walk, bike or take MARTA," Dozier told the Chronicle in July. "But at the very least, the city should be putting policies in place that at least makes that more likely to happen."

Multiple developers are leading projects that aim to reenergize Downtown, including CIM Group's Centennial Yards, Lalani Ventures' redevelopment of Underground Atlanta and Newport RE's plans for Historic Hotel Row. The district is currently known for tourist destinations, aging office buildings and government facilities. About $3.8 billion will be invested in the district in the next five years, according to estimates from the community development organization Central Atlanta Progress.

Meanwhile, Midtown has seen record levels of development, much of it spurred by the growing interest of technology companies to relocate in the area. Sites once considered undesirable to build ambitious projects are now crown jewels in the increasingly site-constrained Midtown core.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #6  
Old Posted Dec 6, 2022, 11:39 PM
Terminus's Avatar
Terminus Terminus is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Atlanta, GA
Posts: 2,250
Quote:
Originally Posted by galaca View Post
The residential numbers are still too high. We should be requiring at least *some* units with no parking whatsoever. I'd start with 5% of apartments/condos - it seems feasible given that 15% of households in the city don't own cars.
__________________
How about this for the city's slogan:

"Atlanta - it's getting there."
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #7  
Old Posted Dec 7, 2022, 6:36 AM
RocketSurgeon RocketSurgeon is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Location: Atlanta
Posts: 899
Quote:
Originally Posted by Terminus View Post
The residential numbers are still too high. We should be requiring at least *some* units with no parking whatsoever. I'd start with 5% of apartments/condos - it seems feasible given that 15% of households in the city don't own cars.
15% is a low number and a significant portion are people who have no choice because of money or medical issues.

In cities with functional transit systems it's more like 30-50% of households. Atlanta is a very long way from reaching that. Like generations, if ever.
Reply With Quote
     
     
End
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Regional Sections > United States > Southeast > Atlanta
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 9:13 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2023, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.