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  #58581  
Old Posted May 16, 2022, 9:03 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by riichkay View Post



The New Yorker has posted an interesting piece re Dennis Hopper's iconic "Double Standard" photo.... https://www.newyorker.com/culture/cu...ht-los-angeles

The article re-dates the image to '63/'64, replacing Hopper's recollection of 1961.

The palm tree in the distance on the right is majestically still there! The Eucalypti on the right, too.


gsv

The palm tree is at the corner of Melrose and Almont.
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  #58582  
Old Posted May 17, 2022, 6:44 PM
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Excellent post on the Toddler House, Noir Noir. ..I tried to dig up some additional information on poor Ginger O' Dare but came up empty. (her real name would have helped)


This snapshot just showed up on eBay

"VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH '14 FLOOD RAILROAD BRIDGE ARROYO LOS ANGELES CALIFORNIA PHOTO"


eBay

Pretty exciting stuff but I couldn't help but notice the impressive house on the hill.




This house....Does anyone recognize it?



.................................The horse is sad because his barn was swept away.


.

Last edited by ethereal_reality; May 17, 2022 at 6:56 PM.
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  #58583  
Old Posted May 18, 2022, 4:12 AM
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Here's another original snapshot currently listed on eBay

"VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH 1920'S EGYPTIAN COURT FOUNTAIN AVE HOLLYWOOD CALIFORNIA PHOTO"


Link

This was going to be a mystery loc. until I noticed this. . .

The seller included Written on back:

" RISSMAN EGYPTIAN COURT AT 5141-1/2 FOUNTAIN AVE IN HOLLYWOOD NEAR LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA "



Much to my surprise, it's still there!



GSV


Now I want to know if the statue (that appears in the 1920s snapshot) is still in place.

...........................................This Beauty.

detail





I attempted to gaze into the courtyard.



But it's impossible to see that far back.


Does anyone live in the area?
.

Last edited by ethereal_reality; May 18, 2022 at 4:26 AM.
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  #58584  
Old Posted May 18, 2022, 6:38 AM
Noir_Noir Noir_Noir is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
I tried to dig up some additional information on poor Ginger O' Dare but came up empty. (her real name would have helped)


Here's a signed Ginger O'Dare publicity picture for you.



facebook.com - Burlyqnell - Vintage Photos of Burlesque Dancers


This odd little story from 1937 appears to indicate O'Dare was her real surname.



cdnc.ucr.edu - Daily News, 9 April 1937


And she was the inspiration for a 1980's sitcom character.


The Cavanaughs, a sitcom which ran for two series on CBS in 1986 and 1989, was created by Robert Moloney.

The character Kit Cavanaugh in the series was loosely based on the life of Moloney's mother - Ginger O'Dare.

Kit in the series is a Las Vegas showgirl who returns to her Irish-Catholic family in Boston.

encyclopedia.com


Video Link

Last edited by Noir_Noir; May 18, 2022 at 6:52 AM.
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  #58585  
Old Posted May 18, 2022, 8:06 AM
JeffDiego JeffDiego is offline
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Egyptian Court Bungalows

Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post
.
Here's another original snapshot currently listed on eBay

"VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPH 1920'S EGYPTIAN COURT FOUNTAIN AVE HOLLYWOOD CALIFORNIA PHOTO"


Link

This was going to be a mystery loc. until I noticed this. . .

The seller included Written on back:

" RISSMAN EGYPTIAN COURT AT 5141-1/2 FOUNTAIN AVE IN HOLLYWOOD NEAR LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA "



Much to my surprise, it's still there!



GSV


Now I want to know if the statue (that appears in the 1920s snapshot) is still in place.

...........................................This Beauty.

detail





I attempted to gaze into the courtyard.



But it's impossible to see that far back.


Does anyone live in the area?
.
What a find, Ethereal. Absolutely fascinating. Talk about living in a movie set. Yes, surely someone can get some current photos to show what it looks like now.
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  #58586  
Old Posted May 18, 2022, 5:15 PM
Noir_Noir Noir_Noir is offline
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Jack Rissman, owner of the Egyptian Court Apartments, and his wife robbed at gunpoint in 1925.



cdnc.ucr.edu - Daily News, 6 January 1925
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  #58587  
Old Posted May 19, 2022, 4:54 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mackerm View Post

LAPL

The Stephen M. White statue has been discussed extensively, but what about its amazing pedestal? What happened to it? The statue was relocated twice, each time with a less impressive perch.

But the original pedestal was enormous, and enormously expensive. The project had of budget of $25,000 dollars in 1906. A series of granite steps held its base - a six-foot cube of white California granite.

See how there's no plaque at the bottom front of the pedestal in the photo above? But in this 1954 photo below, there's a
plaque in that spot that describes White's accomplishments:



examiner-c44-73927 @ USC Digital Library


Unfortunately, that plaque couldn't be used on the statue's new pedestal:



October 30, 1958, San Pedro News-Pilot @ Newspapers.com


Maybe the county sold the granite pedestal at auction? If so, that may have been around the Spring/Summer of 1961, when the
pedestal's home, the "Plaza de la Justicia," was cleared. I think White's statue had been in the lower right corner of this photo:



June 26, 1961, Los Angeles Times @ ProQuest via Los Angeles Public Library
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  #58588  
Old Posted May 19, 2022, 5:40 AM
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Ginger O'Dare was much more beautiful than I expected, Noir Noir. Thanks for posting the publicity still.




re: The odd crime story.


edited

My curiosity was piqued so I dug a bit further and found out that Robert Irwin has a Los Angeles connection, or more precisely, a Pasadena connection.


First of all, here is poor Veronica Gedeon, Robert Irwin's New York murder victim.


ephemeralnewyork


And again.

archetron





And here's Robert Irwin after his arrest in 1937. ..(the same year he sent the flowers to Ginger O'Dare)


eBay

The Los Angeles connection?


Let's start with Robert Irwin's real name. . .drumroll. . .his full birth name is Fenelon Arroyo Seco Irwin. I kid you not! (see below)


The son of evangelist parents, Irwin was actually born in Arroyo Seco Park near Pasadena, California on August 5, 1907. He was named for the nearby river (as was the park) and one of his father's favorite theologians, François Fénelon. Hence, he entered life as Fenelon Arroyo Seco Irwin.

This also caught my attention:...Being a sculptor, Irwin idolized Larado Taft, one of the leading sculptors of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and later moved in with Taft's family. Then, working in a waxworks studio in Los Angeles, Irwin carved commercial busts of President Franklin D. Roosevelt and other public figures."


Being of an inquisitive nature, I am now trying to figure out which "waxwork studio" Irwin worked at in Los Angeles.




Robert George Irwin


Irwin was convicted of the triple slaying and committed to a New York State mental hospital for life. (he died in 1975)

.

Last edited by ethereal_reality; May 19, 2022 at 5:50 AM.
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  #58589  
Old Posted May 19, 2022, 4:37 PM
Noir_Noir Noir_Noir is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ethereal_reality View Post

This also caught my attention:...Being a sculptor, Irwin idolized Larado Taft, one of the leading sculptors of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and later moved in with Taft's family. Then, working in a waxworks studio in Los Angeles, Irwin carved commercial busts of President Franklin D. Roosevelt and other public figures."


Being of an inquisitive nature, I am now trying to figure out which "waxwork studio" Irwin worked at in Los Angeles.

He worked for a while at the waxworks studio of Katherine Stuberg and also at A1 Decorating.



Google Books - The Mad Sculptor By Harold Schechter



rescarta.lapl.org


I cannot find a location for the Stuberg studio.


Here's Katherine Stuberg working on Albert Einstein.



gettyimages.com


And with a lifesize Franklin D. Roosevelt figure.



archive.org - Hollywood-Sport-Broadway 1943-10-12


This is a bust of Herbert Hoover sculpted by Robert Irwin.



hoover.blogs.archives.gov


Just before those jobs Robert Irwin also worked with the sculptor Carlo Romanelli for about a year in 1927/28



Google Books - The Mad Sculptor By Harold Schechter


Romanelli had a studio at his home on N. Hoover St.



rescarta.lapl.org


What's left of it.



redfin.com
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  #58590  
Old Posted May 19, 2022, 6:29 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Noir_Noir View Post

[...]

I cannot find a location for the Stuberg studio.

[...]
Ca. 1936, she lived at 1306 Gordon (just off Fountain) with an artist. They might have had a joint studio there.


1936 LA City Directory

Here's 1306 Gordon nowadays:


gsv
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  #58591  
Old Posted May 19, 2022, 7:05 PM
Martin Pal Martin Pal is online now
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Quote:
Originally Posted by riichkay View Post


The New Yorker has posted an interesting piece re Dennis Hopper's iconic "Double Standard" photo.... https://www.newyorker.com/culture/cu...ht-los-angeles

The article re-dates the image to '63/'64, replacing Hopper's recollection of 1961.
_________________________________________________________________
The version of this photo that I've been acquainted with is this one:



As you notice, the edges are cropped from the version shown in riichkay's post. I mention this because in the top version on the left side it appears to show that the center of Santa Monica Blvd. is being used as parking spaces (correct?) ...and that is something I have never seen before in any photo of this area.
___

In the linked article it says:
Hopper took about a dozen pictures of Geldzahler at the billboard factory, and then, while driving west on Hollywood Boulevard near Musso & Frank Grill, he and Geldzahler encountered the weird spectacle of a woman lying in the middle of the street. This Hopper photograph would become known as “Untitled (Hollywood’s Largest Toy Shop with fallen woman).”

Here's that photo: (I didn't find it in a search of NLA.)

Artsy
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  #58592  
Old Posted May 20, 2022, 12:41 AM
Noir_Noir Noir_Noir is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by odinthor View Post
Ca. 1936, she lived at 1306 Gordon (just off Fountain) with an artist. They might have had a joint studio there.


1936 LA City Directory

Thanks odinthor.

That is one of the two Katherine Stuberg(h)s - mother (K.C) and daughter (K.M) who both sculpted in wax.

I needed to add a "h" to find the studio.


In the 1920's -


rescarta.lapl.org


They moved the studio to Beverly Blvd. in the late 1930's -


rescarta.lapl.org


The Stuberghs provided the wax figures for The Motion Picture Museum and Hall Of Fame in the early 1930's.



waxipedia.blogspot.com


waxipedia.blogspot.com
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  #58593  
Old Posted May 20, 2022, 3:57 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Noir_Noir View Post

[...]

The Stuberghs provided the wax figures for The Motion Picture Museum and Hall Of Fame in the early 1930's.



waxipedia.blogspot.com

[...]
The building's a survivor!


gsv
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  #58594  
Old Posted May 20, 2022, 3:02 PM
Godzilla Godzilla is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by odinthor View Post
The building's a survivor!


gsv



Maybe wishful thinking?


Quote:
The building, located at 5939 Sunset Boulevard, was built in 1924 and started out as a luxury car showroom, the Peerless Motor Company. In 1934, the building was used as offices for radio station KNX, which remained until 1938. After that, it was turned it into Max Reinhardt Studio Workshop, which provided space to workshop stage productions and a school providing acting and radio classes. KMPC, which began in 1927, moved into the space in 1944 from it offices in Beverly Hills. In 1944 the station moved to 5939 Sunset Boulevard and finally in 1968 to 5858 Sunset Boulevard (today home to KTLA). In 1976 the building became home to the Old Spaghetti Factory restaurant. KMPC's final broadcast was in 1997. The call letters now belong to Radio Korea, an all Korean radio station. The building was razed in 2012 to make way for the 22-story Sunset/Gordon Tower. In response to protests from citizens wanting to have the building preserved, the developer partially recreated the original facade. After opening in 2014, a judge issued a ruling invalidating the construction permits, saying city officials improperly allowed the developer to demolish the building.
https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/sho...ostcount=27263
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  #58595  
Old Posted May 20, 2022, 5:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Pal View Post
As you notice, the edges are cropped from the version shown in riichkay's post. I mention this because in the top version on the left side it appears to show that the center of Santa Monica Blvd. is being used as parking spaces (correct?) ...and that is something I have never seen before in any photo of this area.
I was wondering about that myself. Also, it appears that that stretch of Santa Monica Blvd. had 2-way traffic on both sides of the median? I'm wondering if that was the case? Kinda like Huntington Drive once did through South Pasadena and San Marino.
__________________
"I guess the only time people think about injustice is when it happens to them."

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  #58596  
Old Posted May 20, 2022, 10:25 PM
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RE: 5939-45 Sunset Blvd. at Gordon.

Godzilla is correct. The Old Spaghetti Factory facade was (illegally) torn down in 2011. But the Spaghetti Factory facade wasn't original and, in my humble opinion, rather unattractive. As you can see, scavenged columns and metal framework from an entirely different building were added. (what's up with that?)


Spaghetti Factory facade.




Here's the original facade of 5939-45 Sunset Blvd. - It was built as Peerless Automobile Showroom.


jhgraham

The replica is more in tune with the original facade. . than with whatever was going on with the Spaghetti Factory facade..






And here is the facade when the building was home to KNX Radio.


paradiseleased


So I wonder what happened to the original columns?
.

Last edited by ethereal_reality; May 21, 2022 at 12:04 AM.
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  #58597  
Old Posted May 21, 2022, 2:49 AM
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Further reading for anyone who's interested..

5939-45 Sunset Blvd. at Gordon.

Hollywood Daily Citizen, June 25, 1924.


jhgraham





jhgraham

.
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  #58598  
Old Posted May 21, 2022, 6:38 PM
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Noir Noir, thanks for locating the studios where Robert Irwin worked while in Los Angeles.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Noir_Noir View Post
Romanelli had a studio at his home on N. Hoover St.



rescarta.lapl.org

What's left of it.



redfin.com
If the lot sells and human remains are found we know who the culprit is.





alchedtron


Ok, I'm done beating this dead horse.
.
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  #58599  
Old Posted May 22, 2022, 8:26 PM
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[QUOTE=Noir_Noir;9629074]He worked for a while at the waxworks studio of Katherine Stuberg and also at A1 Decorating.

This is a bust of Herbert Hoover sculpted by Robert Irwin.



hoover.blogs.archives.gov



A brief treatise on men's collars

Hoover gave up his stiff starched detachable collars sometime between losing to FDR in 1932, and chairing the government reorganization committee in the early 1950s when I have seen pictures of him with comfortable modern attached business collars as part of his shirt. Modern attached collars in dress business shirts appeared at least as early as the mid 1920s (Arrow shirts with attached collars), but some like Hoover kept wearing the uncomfortable high starched collars. At some point, Hoover choose comfort. His collars must have been so uncomfortable in Washington summers. The military and most workingmen and people at leisure had been wearing shirts with attached unstarched collars that looked modern as early as 1900, since it was an annoyance to attach the starched collars plus they were uncomfortable. Imagine being under fire and having to attach a collar in a battle. In dress uniforms, formal attached collars may still have been used, not sure. Most businessmen and politicians kept their old starched detachable collars on until the mid 1920s. When they left work and got home, they usually removed the collars which were attached to the shirt by fasteners, especially in hot weather. The shirts without the collars resembled a t-shirt with long sleeves (short sleeve dress shirts didn't appear until the 1930s, although short sleeve undershirts and polo shirts existed in the 1920s--men just rolled up their sleeves in hot weather). In photos of the 1925 Scopes Trial, both Bryan and Darrow removed their collars even in court because it was so hot. Pictures exist. In the many photos of the 1920s I have seen, it seems that by 1927 or 1928, modern collars were becoming dominant, tuxedo wing collars and high Hoover collars less common except in the most formal settings. By 1929, most of the traders on the floor of the stock exchange appeared to be wearing modern attached collars and business suits in pictures I have seen of the Great Crash. But Hoover persisted with his high collars long after. And tuxedo suits with wing collars are still rented and worn in formal settings like weddings, formal proms and parties, and diplomatic events. Tradition.

Last edited by CaliNative; May 23, 2022 at 5:06 AM.
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  #58600  
Old Posted May 23, 2022, 1:23 AM
JeffDiego JeffDiego is offline
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High starched collars

[QUOTE=CaliNative;9631308]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noir_Noir View Post
He worked for a while at the waxworks studio of Katherine Stuberg and also at A1 Decorating.

This is a bust of Herbert Hoover sculpted by Robert Irwin.



hoover.blogs.archives.gov



A brief treatise on men's collars

Hoover gave up his stiff starched detachable collars sometime between losing to FDR in 1932, and chairing the Truman government reorganization committee in the 1940s when I have seen pictures of him with comfortable modern attached business collars as part of his shirt. Modern attached collars in dress business shirts appeared at least as early as the mid 1920s (Arrow shirts with attached collars), but some like Hoover kept wearing the uncomfortable high starched collars. At some point, Hoover choose comfort. His collars must have been so uncomfortable in Washington summers. The military and most workingmen and people at leisure had been wearing shirts with attached unstarched collars that looked modern as early as 1900, since it was an annoyance to attach the starched collars plus they were uncomfortable. Imagine being under fire and having to attach a collar in a battle. In dress uniforms, formal attached collars may still have been used, not sure. Most businessmen and politicians kept their old starched detachable collars on until the mid 1920s. In the many photos of the 1920s I have seen, it seems that by 1927 or 1928, modern collars were becoming dominant, tuxedo wing collars and high Hoover collars less common except in the most formal settings. By 1929, most of the traders on the floor of the stock exchange appeared to be wearing modern attached collars and business suits in pictures I have seen of the Great Crash. But Hoover persisted with his high collars long after. And tuxedo suits with wing collars are still rented and worn in formal settings like weddings, formal proms and parties, and diplomatic events. Tradition.
Interesting history lesson. Thanks. Indeed, can you imagine wearing a high starched collar in D.C. in the Summer? Whew.
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