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  #901  
Old Posted Jul 27, 2022, 6:14 AM
CaliNative CaliNative is offline
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Originally Posted by citywatch View Post
When I lived near redondo bch several yrs ago, I recall the backyard pool wasn't as useful around there as it would have been in the valley or further inland. Coastal LA tends to be always under the influence of the marine layer or what's a higher level version of the fog that SF is notorious for.

For ppl living further away from the coast, that ocean air is a form of natural AC. But for the beaches of LA, the cooler weather makes them less ideal for a hot summer resort vibe...as what's found in florida, the Caribbean or the southern Mediterranean. I notice many of the past days of this live cam of venice bch shows a lot of a marine layer.

https://youtu.be/vvOjJoSEFM0

^ The cooler coastal weather & lower humidity are now preferred by me. But when I was younger, I spent one summer several miles to the south in the cloudy marine weather of Long bch. I recall getting quite a sunburn....the lack of direct sun & heat misleads a person to assume that ultraviolet rays won't be bad

Regarding Long Beach, it is in the lee of the fairly tall Palos Verdes Hills (where Tiger Woods crashed his car), so the marine layer is often thinner and burns off earlier than the coastal cities on the other side of the hills, e.g. Redondo Beach, Manhattan Beach etc. Long Beach is usually a few degrees warmer than the beach towns to the west on Santa Monica Bay. Long Beach faces San Pedro Bay to the south. However, during "Catalina eddies", sometimes the marine layer comes in from the south, so LB sometimes has a thick marine cloud layer like the towns on Santa Monica Bay. Also, the further south you go down the coast from Long Beach, into Orange County, the influence of the Palos Verdes Hills wanes, so south of Seal Beach a normal thick cool cloudy marine layer is found in places like Huntington Beach and Newport Beach and all the way down to San Clemente and into San Diego County beyond. The Marine layer is most common in May and June ("May Gray" and "June Gloom"). Sometimes it extends into mid July, but is much less common in August and September when even the beaches usually get sunny and warm in SoCal.

Last edited by CaliNative; Jul 27, 2022 at 6:33 AM.
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  #902  
Old Posted Jul 27, 2022, 7:00 AM
citywatch citywatch is offline
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^ I realize the topic of this part of ssp is about cities & their climate, but I really found the following vid very interesting....it makes me feel good about LB. I recall vacationing there when I was a kid, so it has always been important to me.

https://youtu.be/6W8U3Nl4Zzg

LB is in the shadow of the PV peninsula, so that affects its weather, making it warmer than bch areas further north.

Although I'm not happy to hear the youtuber say the 2nd largest downtown in the LA basin is nicer or cleaner than the largest one is, I'd rather LB be up & coming than the way it was yrs ago. Or the way it was at a time when dt pasadena & the old 2nd St mall in Samo were also struggling. dtla is still trying to shake off the effects from that same moment in time.
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  #903  
Old Posted Jul 27, 2022, 3:01 PM
CaliNative CaliNative is offline
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Originally Posted by citywatch View Post
^ I realize the topic of this part of ssp is about cities & their climate, but I really found the following vid very interesting....it makes me feel good about LB. I recall vacationing there when I was a kid, so it has always been important to me.

https://youtu.be/6W8U3Nl4Zzg

LB is in the shadow of the PV peninsula, so that affects its weather, making it warmer than bch areas further north.

Although I'm not happy to hear the youtuber say the 2nd largest downtown in the LA basin is nicer or cleaner than the largest one is, I'd rather LB be up & coming than the way it was yrs ago. Or the way it was at a time when dt pasadena & the old 2nd St mall in Samo were also struggling. dtla is still trying to shake off the effects from that same moment in time.

I like Long Beach a great deal, as I do Pasadena, another city with great history and character. LB is the second largest city in L.A. County (almost 500,000 people) and has several old art deco buildings, and great character. It is up and coming. A year or two ago a new 35 story residential building was completed on the waterfront. On my seldom visited 1920s blog on "Found City Photos" I have posted s YouTube video of the clsssic deco buildings of LB. I intend to return to my 1920s blog soon, and hopefully more people will visit.

Last edited by CaliNative; Jul 29, 2022 at 12:51 AM.
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  #904  
Old Posted Jul 27, 2022, 4:24 PM
citywatch citywatch is offline
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^ I posted the following link earlier in this topic because the youtuber shows a variety of areas in socal...the admittedly more presentable sections of the LA area . But I think his walking vids give a good sense of the way that climate affects the look & vibe of a community.

Although cities in wetter climates tend to be greener....due to lots more rain (which we could use some right now)...there's what I describe as a warmer (literally, figuratively), friendlier look about a Mediterranean type climate. But all cities & countries have both positive & negative traits, & all ppl have different tastes, standards, preferences. So what's a good climate to one person may not be appealing to someone else...& visa versa.


https://www.youtube.com/c/JSOCAL1
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  #905  
Old Posted Jul 27, 2022, 10:03 PM
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Originally Posted by LA21st View Post
Who doesn't have ac
Do you just make shit it up?
Ive never seen someone try to be an expert of California 2000 miles away.
It's so freaking weird.
lol

There are millions of CA residents with no AC. There are large chunks of the state where it's unnecessary most of the time...so why would everyone have it?

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Originally Posted by homebucket View Post
He’s probably thinking of SF. Most of the housing stock here doesn’t have AC.
Oakland too, as well as many other coastal areas.
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  #906  
Old Posted Jul 28, 2022, 2:42 AM
citywatch citywatch is offline
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This vid that was posted on Monday makes me think of the point I was making in this thread a few days ago....that LA has a Mediterranean type climate, associated with resort areas in southern Spain and southern france, and parts of Italy too, that also comes within the framework of a large urban scene.

https://youtu.be/QropkR9iasY

Resort areas like cannes, marbella, st tropez, costa del sol, tuscany, etc, are outside major centers like paris, madrid, rome, london, so it's a choice of one or the other. However, transit in europe is very good, so traveling from a resort with beaches & med-type climate to a big city is cheap & convenient.

France's 2nd largest city, coastal marseilles...& older than Paris...does have a med type climate, but it's not as much an international hub as certain other cities are.
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  #907  
Old Posted Jul 28, 2022, 2:55 AM
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Another unusual aspect of the coastal California climate is having one of the strongest seasonal lags on the planet:



Here in Fairbanks, we have a very short seasonal lag, with the warmest average highs being the first week of July, so our weather is already trending cooler with fall (leaves changing, cold rains, potential for frosts) arriving in mid-August.
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  #908  
Old Posted Jul 28, 2022, 3:49 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tech12 View Post
lol

There are millions of CA residents with no AC. There are large chunks of the state where it's unnecessary most of the time...so why would everyone have it?


Oakland too, as well as many other coastal areas.

I never said everyone.
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  #909  
Old Posted Jul 28, 2022, 10:57 PM
CaliNative CaliNative is offline
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San Diego area weather has turned perfect again. Highs in 70s F within 5 miles of the coast. Cool nights. Perfect.
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  #910  
Old Posted Jul 28, 2022, 11:03 PM
CaliNative CaliNative is offline
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Originally Posted by ChiSoxRox View Post
Another unusual aspect of the coastal California climate is having one of the strongest seasonal lags on the planet:



Here in Fairbanks, we have a very short seasonal lag, with the warmest average highs being the first week of July, so our weather is already trending cooler with fall (leaves changing, cold rains, potential for frosts) arriving in mid-August.

Map really shows nicely how in most years the warmest period on most of the Pacific coastal fringe is in mid/late August into September, later than most of the rest of the country, where heat peaks in late June, July, early August (July peak heat covers most of the map). The current heat wave in the northwest is somewhat unusual in being early, before August. Portland OR, being inland from the coast, does have a July heat peak though. But most of the San Diego, L.A. and San Francisco metro coastal areas don't have peak heat until after mid August.

In parts of Arizona, New Mexico, and west Texas peak heat occurs in late June. This is because the monsoonal moisture usually hasn't arrived yet from the Gulf, so the early summer sun (when it is highest in the sky at noon) beats down brutally on the desert. By mid July, the monsoonal clouds and rain have usually arrived (some years they don't), cooling things off a bit.

Last edited by CaliNative; Jul 29, 2022 at 12:47 AM.
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  #911  
Old Posted Jul 28, 2022, 11:45 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LA21st View Post
I never said everyone.
lol you said this:

Quote:
Originally Posted by LA21st View Post
Who doesn't have ac

...which clearly implies that you think everyone in CA has AC. And you were mad about it too:

Quote:
Originally Posted by LA21st View Post
Do you just make shit it up?
Ive never seen someone try to be an expert of California 2000 miles away.
It's so freaking weird.
I dunno, he seems like more of a CA expert than you. At least when it comes to the topic of AC.

Chill out man! Turn the AC on, perhaps.
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