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  #1  
Old Posted Oct 19, 2021, 11:32 PM
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Study: More Californians Moving to Houston than to Austin, San Antonio or Dallas

What the Houston Chronicle's article conveniently fails to mention is that the DFW area (4 counties) has the highest total numbers and the Austin area (3 counties) has the second highest. At least when counting only the top ten counties. Counties surrounding Houston are not included because they aren't in the top ten.




More Californians are moving to Harris County than any other spot in Texas, study says



Californians have long exchanged their Hollywood stars for Texas cowboy boots in a migration trend that has sailed for more than a decade, and isn't showing signs of anchoring anytime soon.

A one-way trip from California to Texas is one of the busiest interstate relocation routes in the U.S., according to StorageCafé, only challenged by the New York to Florida moving corridor.

But where do Californians land most? It's Houston.

More specifically, it's Harris County, which ranked as the most popular destination for people relocating to Texas from California, according to a recent StorageCafé analysis of Census data. The No. 1 place of origin? Los Angeles County, home to Hollywood.

Harris County also offers newcomers the biggest bang for the buck, the study shows. Here, the typical home is 57 percent cheaper than in Los Angeles County with a median home price difference of $482,010 and a median square foot difference of 577, according to the analysis. Also, homes in Harris County offer Californians more than 580 square feet in extra living space compared to LA County. The unemployment rate is much lower as well at 7.4 percent compared to more than 10 percent in LA County, whereas the average annual pay is higher in Harris compared to LA County (almost $75,000 vs. $73,000).

Harris County reported 3,263 new arrivals from LA County in 2019, according to the study. Among other California counties, Harris County also welcomed a number of new residents from San Diego County (840) and Riverside County (698).

Following Harris County in the ranks are Dallas and Travis counties, which have a median home price difference of $488,000 and $322,350 and differences of 221 and 482 square feet respectively.

Other popular Texas counties that made the list included Tarrant, Bexar, Collin, Denton, Williamson, El Paso and Bell.

https://www.houstonchronicle.com/new...ce=twitter.com


The Chronicle needs to update their Downtown photo.

Last edited by bilbao58; Oct 22, 2021 at 11:33 PM.
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  #2  
Old Posted Oct 19, 2021, 11:55 PM
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LA to Houston doesn't surprise me but I suspect more people from the Bay Area are keepin' it weird in Austin.
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  #3  
Old Posted Oct 20, 2021, 12:06 AM
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Originally Posted by JManc View Post
LA to Houston doesn't surprise me but I suspect more people from the Bay Area are keepin' it weird in Austin.
Interestingly, LA County is the top originating place for all major counties in Texas except El Paso.

ETA: I suppose it's not so interesting when considering how many people live in LA County.
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Old Posted Oct 20, 2021, 12:07 AM
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Are they going by county? Harris County is the biggest urban county in Texas, larger than Dallas and Tarrant. An MSA measure would be more useful.

Aside from being a large city with a moderately lower cost of living I have no idea why anyone go out of their way to live here versus anywhere else.

Last edited by llamaorama; Oct 20, 2021 at 1:04 AM.
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  #5  
Old Posted Oct 20, 2021, 2:59 AM
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3,000? from La County? Not sure how this is even news.
So 6-7k from Southern California? Out of 22 million?
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  #6  
Old Posted Oct 20, 2021, 4:05 AM
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Surprised by this. I would assume that Californians would be more at home in the more hiller and arid parts of Texas like Austin, El Paso, or San Antonio. Speaking of San Antonio, I would like to see it become more relevant and urban in the future. Out of all the Texas metros, it's the most interesting to me. As Austin continues to grow, maybe some of that growth will rub off onto San Antonio.
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  #7  
Old Posted Oct 20, 2021, 5:20 AM
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Originally Posted by bilbao58 View Post
[B][SIZE="4"]But where do Californians land most? It's Houston.

More specifically, it's Harris County, which ranked as the most popular destination for people relocating to Texas from California, according to a recent StorageCafé analysis of Census data. The No. 1 place of origin? Los Angeles County, home to Hollywood.
Yeah, Hollywood--and Los Angeles County is also home to over 10 million people.

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Originally Posted by bilbao58 View Post
Interestingly, LA County is the top originating place for all major counties in Texas except El Paso.

ETA: I suppose it's not so interesting when considering how many people live in LA County.
Yep. There will always be a lot of people moving out of a county so incredibly populous.
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Old Posted Oct 20, 2021, 5:27 AM
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I mean, this fits with me seeing more California license plates in Texas than any other out of state plates. It's a numbers game, and Houston has an edge.
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  #9  
Old Posted Oct 20, 2021, 5:31 AM
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Does the article state if there was any reverse migration from Harris to LA county? That would be interesting to know too.
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  #10  
Old Posted Oct 20, 2021, 5:40 AM
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I mean, this fits with me seeing more California license plates in Texas than any other out of state plates. It's a numbers game, and Houston has an edge.
How many out of state license plates you see is a function of many things including the cost differential of registering a car in the different states. Not everybody obeys laws about reregistering cars if you move to a new location if it costs more. And some people are just too lazy to bother doing it--after all, how likely are they to get caught?

As for people moving from CA to Houston, they better get ready for major acclimation issues. Coming from the west coast or the southwest, anywhere along the Gulf coast or southeast feels like a steam bath. Even the 80s feels miserable until you get used to it and that takes months (I grew up in the east and southeast and even I am miserable if I go back there anytime but winter).

I know--there's air conditioning. But actually not in many places north of LA (and even LA itself if you are near the water). Many homes in SF don't even have central heat. My condo doesn't--we have built-in electric baseboard heaters which I almost never turn on and no A/C. That shocked me when I moved from Florida 40 years ago but not any more--artificial climate control just isn't necessary on the west coast and realizing how critical it is in Houston may come as a surprise.
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  #11  
Old Posted Oct 20, 2021, 5:46 AM
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Yeah, Hollywood--and Los Angeles County is also home to over 10 million people.

Yep. There will always be a lot of people moving out of a county so incredibly populous.
For those of us definitely NOT planning a move, the more who go the merrier. They will take California's "housing crisis" with them (why do we need more housing if everybody's leaving?) and the general sensation of overcrowding too. Seems like all those people who moved TO California in the 1950s and 60s bred like lemmings (guess they weren't all gay after all) and now we need a mass cliff-march unless a lot of offspring leave. So "good bye and good luck".
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  #12  
Old Posted Oct 20, 2021, 6:10 AM
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Houston is definitely the place in Texas Id move to if I had to move to that state. No offense to the other cities, I just gel better with Houstonians, since like the 1990s.
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  #13  
Old Posted Oct 20, 2021, 6:47 AM
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Houston is definitely the place in Texas Id move to if I had to move to that state. No offense to the other cities, I just gel better with Houstonians, since like the 1990s.
Ever been to San Antonio? I think that's where I'd go. The River Walk is very nice, the "hill country" is too. I don't see much as interesting as those in Houston except its proximity to Galveston and New Orleans.
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Old Posted Oct 20, 2021, 7:33 AM
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Yeah, but they’re not the cool Californians so no one cares.
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Old Posted Oct 20, 2021, 7:36 AM
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Originally Posted by Pedestrian View Post
Ever been to San Antonio? I think that's where I'd go. The River Walk is very nice, the "hill country" is too. I don't see much as interesting as those in Houston except its proximity to Galveston and New Orleans.
The River Walk is nice? You’d love Navy Pier or Fanieul Hall. Or I can’t remember which pier in San Francisco, but whichever one has the Bubba Gump Shrimp location.
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Old Posted Oct 20, 2021, 8:56 AM
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Originally Posted by Pedestrian View Post
How many out of state license plates you see is a function of many things including the cost differential of registering a car in the different states. Not everybody obeys laws about reregistering cars if you move to a new location if it costs more. And some people are just too lazy to bother doing it--after all, how likely are they to get caught?

As for people moving from CA to Houston, they better get ready for major acclimation issues. Coming from the west coast or the southwest, anywhere along the Gulf coast or southeast feels like a steam bath. Even the 80s feels miserable until you get used to it and that takes months (I grew up in the east and southeast and even I am miserable if I go back there anytime but winter).

I know--there's air conditioning. But actually not in many places north of LA (and even LA itself if you are near the water). Many homes in SF don't even have central heat. My condo doesn't--we have built-in electric baseboard heaters which I almost never turn on and no A/C. That shocked me when I moved from Florida 40 years ago but not any more--artificial climate control just isn't necessary on the west coast and realizing how critical it is in Houston may come as a surprise.
In Texas, the deadline is 30 days from the time you move here to when you have to register. Of course, if the cops become stretched too thin here as in other places, I'm betting people will get away with it. My brother in law got hit at a 4 way stop - not his fault, and the cops told them straight up they wouldn't come out for a report unless someone was injured or the vehicles weren't driveable. So it might be poetic that we're getting a bunch of Californians coming here.

Still, I see a ton of out of state plates here from all over the place. In the last month that I can remember, I've seen plates from California, Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, Oklahoma, Arkansas, Louisiana, Alabama, Florida, North Carolina, Virginia, Missouri, Tennessee, Minnesota, Illinois, Ohio, Massachusetts, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey...?

As for the weather, I suspect people will adapt. I always think about what life was like for people who lived in the south well before air conditioning. I've been able to trace my roots back to Georgia to at least 1793. I always look at the Texas Capitol and an amazed that thing existed before air conditioning. I think what the street must have been like from drought to flood. I do much better in warm weather. I just hate cold weather and always have. I was already cringing last week when our morning lows were in the upper 40s, but our high today of 91F felt great.

And what I meant by "this fits" is just that California has a lot more people than say, Wyoming, which even though is closer to me, I pretty much never see any cars from there. I also see a lot of people here from Florida, and for some reason, I've been seeing more from New Jersey, which is a bit odd.

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Originally Posted by Pedestrian View Post
Ever been to San Antonio? I think that's where I'd go. The River Walk is very nice, the "hill country" is too. I don't see much as interesting as those in Houston except its proximity to Galveston and New Orleans.
I love San Antonio and am totally biased about it on certain things - I was born there, but it has a different feel than the other Texas cities, and I'm not talking about the Mexican culture and old world charm its downtown has. I sort of think that wild growth that the other Texas cities have seen recently hasn't quite happened in San Antonio. That's not to say there isn't any, but there are places there that don't look like they've changed in 40 or 50 years.

Anyway, San Antonio has plenty of weather issues to worry with. They're 80 miles closer to the coast than Austin is and have had full on hurricanes falling apart over the city dumping rain down there. They're also farther west at the same time. Anyway, the Riverwalk is a gem and I don't care who doesn't know it. There are plenty of good places to go there that aren't tourist orgies and that are legit San Antonio.
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Old Posted Oct 20, 2021, 9:16 AM
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Furthernore we know from postal service data, we know the actual numbers from the Bay Area to Texas are very small.

My old thread
Quote:
Originally Posted by dimondpark View Post
I thought it would be much higher given all the media hysteria.

Only 4,000 out of 115,000 household and business address changes during the pandemic are out-of-state, that's 3.7%----1.0% moved to Washington State, and 0.6% moved to Texas.






% of movers who relocated out-of-state
6% San Francisco
5% Santa Clara
2% Alameda
2% Contra Costa
1% Marin
1% San Mateo

% of movers who relocated elsewhere in CA
37% Santa Clara
24% Alameda
19% Contra Costa
13% San Francisco
7% Marin
7% San Mateo

% of movers who relocate within the 9-county Bay Area

92% San Mateo
91% Marin
81% San Francisco
79% Contra Costa
74% Alameda
58% Santa Clara

The biggest county-to-county shift during this pandemic has not been from San Francisco to some out-of-state location but from Santa Clara to Sacramento and the Central Valley. That far outstrips any migration to Seattle or Austin or anywhere else, and that further perpetuates the connection between the Bay Area and it's outlying areas, which means the CSA is going to get bigger.
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Old Posted Oct 20, 2021, 10:39 AM
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That makes sense.

It sounds like most people who move out of state are moving to Washington or Texas, but that most people who move anywhere are staying in state.

So, not really an exodus or anything.
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Old Posted Oct 20, 2021, 10:46 AM
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LA to Houston doesn't surprise me but I suspect more people from the Bay Area are keepin' it weird in Austin.
Houston is much like L.A. in urban form, but with 3 times the rainfall, hurricanes and tropical storms, hot humid summers and no mountains, hills or earthquakes. Otherwise quite similar. If I moved to Texas it would probably be to Houston or Galveston, the Santa Monica of Texas. I would feel right at home. As far as Austin goes, the hilly topography is more familiar, and the funky let it be attitude is somewhat attractive, but it is getting very crowded and expensive, and traffic might be the worst in the state.

Last edited by CaliNative; Oct 20, 2021 at 11:08 AM.
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Old Posted Oct 20, 2021, 11:10 AM
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Houston is much like L.A. in urban form, but with 3 times the rainfall, hurricanes and tropical storms, hot humid summers and no mountains, hills or earthquakes. Otherwise quite similar. If I moved to Texas it would probably be to Houston or Galveston, the Santa Monica of Texas. I would feel right at home. As far as Austin goes, the hilly topography is more familiar, and the funky let it be attitude is somewhat attractive, but it is getting very crowded and expensive, and traffic might be the worst in the state.
I wonder how these Californians are going to handle the humidity. Or vastly inferior beaches.
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