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  #221  
Old Posted Aug 3, 2007, 7:50 PM
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Hydrogen Olympic buses to be built in Winnipeg

Fri Aug 3 13:07:00 CDT 2007

VICTORIA (CP) -- A well-known Winnipeg company will build the world’s first fleet of Hydrogen buses under a $46 million contract awarded by B.C. Transit.
New Flyer Industries will build the 20 green machines, promising delivery by the end of 2009.

The fuel-cell powered, low-floor buses will have a top speed of 90 kilometres an hour and a range of 500 kilometres.

The zero-emission fleet will be based in Whistler, B.C.

The B.C. government, which has promised to cut the province’s greenhouse gas emissions by one-third by 2020, says the hydrogen buses will be a visible part of public transportation during the 2010 Winter Olympics.

Ballard Power Systems of Burnaby will provide the fuel cell modules and Calgary’s Dynetek Industries will supply the hydrogen storage system.
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  #222  
Old Posted Aug 3, 2007, 10:02 PM
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great news for newflyer and sweet news for winnipeg
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  #223  
Old Posted Aug 4, 2007, 5:32 PM
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great news for newflyer and sweet news for winnipeg
Well it might not be great new for me personally... then again maybe it is.
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  #224  
Old Posted Aug 4, 2007, 9:36 PM
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Well it might not be great new for me personally... then again maybe it is.
now if we could stop burning coal to make power then hydrogen would be even better for the enviroment....
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  #225  
Old Posted Aug 7, 2007, 12:55 AM
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now if we could stop burning coal to make power then hydrogen would be even better for the enviroment....
I can't remember the last time I saw a coal burning bus ... but I have seen a few burning excessive amounts of blue smoke.
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  #226  
Old Posted Aug 7, 2007, 6:02 AM
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I always find it comical how Manitobans rant and rave about Hydro power. Aside from all the debates about costs and grids, what about this simple conundrum. WHAT DO WE DO, IF A MAJOR DROUGHT HITS AND THE RESEVOIRS RUN DRY?

...Would it not be pertinent to invest in a nuclear reactor (near Pinawa, if I recall correctly, we passed by a quality opportunity ...I could be wrong on this). Excess can still be sold (grid; pushed eastward) and can be used in spot situations. Imagine investing, what is it? $800 million? In the the new dam, and then seeing it run dry for a short (or long???) duration a few years down the road. We would have indebted ourselves as a province with ZERO alternative or insurance policy. An energy crunch in the USA and Ontaio means our neighbours won't have a helping hand to lend. Unless we cover the province with photo-voltaic cells or dress it in turbines, the wind and the sun are laughable options.

For our sake, I hope Hydro can hum along.
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  #227  
Old Posted Aug 7, 2007, 5:43 PM
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I always find it comical how Manitobans rant and rave about Hydro power. Aside from all the debates about costs and grids, what about this simple conundrum. WHAT DO WE DO, IF A MAJOR DROUGHT HITS AND THE RESEVOIRS RUN DRY?

...Would it not be pertinent to invest in a nuclear reactor (near Pinawa, if I recall correctly, we passed by a quality opportunity ...I could be wrong on this). Excess can still be sold (grid; pushed eastward) and can be used in spot situations. Imagine investing, what is it? $800 million? In the the new dam, and then seeing it run dry for a short (or long???) duration a few years down the road. We would have indebted ourselves as a province with ZERO alternative or insurance policy. An energy crunch in the USA and Ontaio means our neighbours won't have a helping hand to lend. Unless we cover the province with photo-voltaic cells or dress it in turbines, the wind and the sun are laughable options.

For our sake, I hope Hydro can hum along.
Canada needs nuclear weapons before it makes more nuclear reactors
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  #228  
Old Posted Aug 7, 2007, 5:56 PM
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^ no we don't. Candu reactors are designed to operate using the less volatile grade of uranium. The kind that isn't used in weapons.

Nuclear energy will never get off the ground in this province. It costs too much to build - and it is (rightly or wrongly) villafied by the public and media.
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  #229  
Old Posted Aug 8, 2007, 1:05 PM
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Originally Posted by Jeff1987 View Post
I always find it comical how Manitobans rant and rave about Hydro power. Aside from all the debates about costs and grids, what about this simple conundrum. WHAT DO WE DO, IF A MAJOR DROUGHT HITS AND THE RESEVOIRS RUN DRY?

For our sake, I hope Hydro can hum along.
Actually, Hydro CAN hum along in the face of water shortages in its reservoirs.

In the South there are coal and natural gas generating plants in Selkirk and Brandon. Brandon's capacity is around 360 MW, and Selkirk is 160 MW.

Check out this PDF on hydro's website about the Selkirk station: http://www.hydro.mb.ca/corporate/fac...gs_selkirk.pdf
Quoting from it:
As a primarily hydroelectric utility,
Manitoba Hydro is dependent on
river flows for over 95 per cent of its electricity
and is, therefore, vulnerable to low
river flows or droughts. To protect customers
from the impacts of low water
flows and meet demand during times of
peak usage, Manitoba Hydro maintains
two thermal generating stations in the
southern part of the province – one at
Selkirk and another in Brandon.

Adding large amounts of wind energy to the grid certainly helps provide yet more reserve when required.
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  #230  
Old Posted Aug 9, 2007, 12:17 PM
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good news story on the medical equipment business in Winnipeg

...

Companies spawned by city research centres

THE Winnipeg company that makes an expensive automated machine that fills intravenous bags and syringes has just hired one of the top U.S. experts on handling hazardous drugs.
Intelligent Hospital Systems has about 40 employees and has enough customers for its robotic IV automation system (RIVA) to sell out its 2008 production run at about $1 million each. Its CEO, Kevin McGarry, figures they will sell about 50 by the end of the year.

Not too far away from IHS's brand new production facility near Kenaston and McGillvray boulevards, another medical technology company, IMRIS (which used to stand for Innovative Magnetic Resonance Imaging Systems), has recently moved into a large space formerly occupied by Gendis Inc.

IMRIS has close to 100 people on the payroll, several with post-graduate degrees, including its vice-president of technology, Steve Huschek, who has a PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Both companies are experiencing a flush of success after many years of expensive development with the certainty of commercial viability only a recent phenomenon.

Success in the globally competitive medical-device field almost automatically brings with it the ability to recruit world-class talent. These high-tech Winnipeg operations prove that attracting the best people from around the world has more to do with the quality of jobs than where the company is located.
Both of these Winnipeg companies have grown out of research based at a couple of the city's research centres -- IHS from the St. Boniface General Hospital Research Centre and IMRIS from the National Research Council's Institute for Biodiagnostics.

The research and development process was a process lasting more than 10 years and on top of the difficult challenges in continuing to finance development before there were any paying customers, it also required a certain amount of luck to keep them in Winnipeg.

IMRIS has developed a surgical imaging system for use in brain surgery and spinal and soft-tissue procedures and has the only system of its kind in the world designed so that the magnet moves over the patient for imaging and then is retracted to allow complete surgical access to the patient.

After its successful demonstration in Calgary's Foothills Hospital earlier this decade and new ownership led by Winnipeg technology entrepreneur David Graves arrived in 2005, IMRIS has ramped up operations dramatically. It has installed about a dozen units all over the U.S. -- with a pricetag of about $5 million each -- and is in the process of designing new applications and configurations that will expand its marketing potential even further.

The NRC wasn't as lucky when it came to its other most successful spin-off company, Novadaq Technologies. Another company that has developed imaging technology that surgeons can use in the midst of operations, it moved its operations to Toronto about five years ago primarily to be closer to investors and potential investors.

But in addition to IMRIS and IHS there are several smaller Winnipeg medical and technological device companies in the works including another spawn of the NRC that will make smaller, less expensive magnetic resonance imaging machines that would be marketed to communities not large enough (or rich enough) to afford the larger multi-million dollar versions.

The creation of companies like these is a lengthy, costly, risky process that requires luck along the way.

But these are the companies that create the kind of jobs a city like Winnipeg needs keep pace with the world. Nothing breeds success like success so maybe the next round of medical device companies will find the road just a little shorter and less dirty.

martin.cash@freepress.mb.ca
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  #231  
Old Posted Aug 10, 2007, 11:46 PM
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Its great to see the biomed city take off!!

There seems some very things happening in the area.
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  #232  
Old Posted Aug 11, 2007, 2:05 PM
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Dad showed me that robotic arm when I was 10.

That device has so much potential, but it's been an uphill battle trying to find private capital to finance the idea. It just doesn't exist in Winnipeg anymore.

The big banks abandoned this city years ago, and Crocus collapsed. It's just Ensis right now.

Quote:
The NRC wasn't as lucky when it came to its other most successful spin-off company, Novadaq Technologies. Another company that has developed imaging technology that surgeons can use in the midst of operations, it moved its operations to Toronto about five years ago primarily to be closer to investors and potential investors.

What people have yet to figure out is that without money to finance new ideas our city dies.
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  #233  
Old Posted Aug 11, 2007, 3:15 PM
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An interesting dialogue between former Free Press editor Nick Hirst and Leonard Asper.

Quote:
Missing out on 'Media City'


Thu Aug 9 2007 | Winnipeg Free Press Commentary



THERE was a brief, shining moment a few years ago when it appeared that Winnipeg was about to gain a national importance that had eluded it since its glory days in the early 20th century.

Winnipeg was poised to become a media centre. There was a national buzz about what was happening here. A convergence of events, largely driven by home-grown entrepreneurs, had placed the headquarters of the largest media empire in the country in Winnipeg, with a number of other smaller, but important entities centred here as well.

CanWest Global Communications was the dominant player. The Craig family of Brandon had the A-Channel stations, WTN, the women's television network was headquartered in Winnipeg, so was the Aboriginal People's Television Network. In modern economic parlance, it looked like Winnipeg had developed a "cluster" of economic interests: exactly what many pundits say drives growth. Not only did we have the appearance of a cluster, it was a cluster of the best kind --intellectual property businesses for the post-industrial era. In addition, Winnipeg was busy developing an active, if relatively small, film and television production industry. The National Screen Institute, a pre-eminent adult film training program and film festival organizer and sponsor moved from Edmonton to Winnipeg. It was an exciting time.

Now, much of the promise has evaporated. CanWest remains a powerhouse in television and newspapers and still has its headquarters in Winnipeg, but Leonard Asper, its chief executive, has moved, at least temporarily, to Toronto and Global television is very much a Toronto-based operation. CanWest's support of Winnipeg has been exemplary, but the heart of the business isn't here.

The Craigs sold their business to CHUM, a Toronto-based company, which has now been bought by CTV. WTN's ownership changed and it moved to Toronto. Aboriginal television is still here, so is the National Screen Institute and the film and television sector has continued to grow, but Winnipeg is not "Media City" and hasn't got as much national bounce from the media businesses as Atlanta received from Ted Turner's building and centring CNN there.

Could it have been different? Could the city and provincial governments have created conditions that would have made the promise become a reality? If not governments, then how about private-sector organizations or even the companies themselves? Why was it that a cluster broke apart just as it was forming?

I raise the questions because I believe it is fundamental to the future of the city and the province. The convergence of events that brings together a major economic cluster in a single city happens rarely, and grasping the opportunity may spell the difference between spectacular growth and relative decline.

If there were an opportunity missed, it would not be unique to Manitoba. Canada is littered with similar missed opportunities. Our mining businesses: Inco, Falconbridge and Alcan have slipped into foreign hands rather than combining into a national "cluster" and international force. BCE, the heart of Canada's communications industry, is being purchased by pension funds backed by American buy-out specialists rather than combining with its rival Telus into another potential international powerhouse.

Not that foreign takeovers are wrong or bad for the economy -- they haven't proved to be so. However, strong national companies and vibrant clusters are keys to economic success.

To give the Manitoba government its due, it was instrumental in at least two aspects of potentially creating "Media City": it brought the NSI to Winnipeg and it created financial conditions to build television and film production. It can also claim some credit for the aboriginal network.

Could it have done more? Arguing that government failed to take advantage of a business situation is dangerous. Governments' attempts at business and industrial strategies are a litany of failures and misspent cash.

Government can, however, create conditions for economic success. Their fiscal, regulatory and promotional powers all influence whether a nascent cluster grows or fails. The recent trends of foreign takeovers and the failure of the potential Manitoba cluster suggest that Canada is not doing very well at creating the kind of economic powerhouses that are emerging from globalization.

That's not to let business off the hook. But business itself doesn't create the framework for economic success, it builds on natural advantages and the economic policies provided by government. To blame the Manitoba government or individual businesses for the failure of "Media City" would be foolish. The important questions are: Has the near miss taught us any lessons? And if an opportunity came again, would business and government grasp it with both arms?

Nicholas Hirst is CEO of Winnipeg-based television and film producer

Original Pictures Inc.
Quote:
Winnipeg did not miss becoming 'Media City'


Sat Aug 11 2007 | Winnipeg Free Press Commentary

Leonard Asper



NICHOLAS Hirst's musings (Aug. 9) as to why Winnipeg is not a "media city" deserve a response so that Manitobans do not look around for someone to blame, as we are often wont to do (although I see far fewer Manitobans reflecting that state of mind today, and more actually doing something proactive to improve our lot).

There are a number of reasons why Winnipeg is not a "media city", and they are the same reasons that Calgary, Regina and Halifax are not media cities. Media are driven by advertising and programming. The advertising agencies and most national advertisers are generally based in Toronto. The production sector, while more spread out, is still largely based in Toronto, and all the major U.S. and other program distributors are based in that city as well. In other words, the suppliers and customers are located there, which requires people to be located there. In fact, though, media are everywhere, because much of it is local. So there are media jobs in all cities where there is media, and then there are cities like Toronto or New York, which attract other jobs in media for the reasons I articulated above. Winnipeg has at least 12 radio stations, five TV stations and dozens of local publications.

For CanWest's part, we have actually moved jobs here and created hundreds more, wherever it has been possible. The net effect is that CanWest now employs close to 500 people in Winnipeg, up from 100 in Mr. Hirst's "glory days". We have also maintained our head office here notwithstanding that it would save us money to move it to, say, Alberta.

To Mr. Hirst's larger point, provinces, states or countries develop industries based on natural advantages they have, such as resources, or where there is no natural advantage, through government policy, as Mr. Hirst acknowledges. Conversely, they do not develop industries for which there is a natural disadvantage such that the policies required to develop a particular industry would result in subsidization at a net cost to its taxpayers. Certain aspects of the media industry are more naturally suited to Toronto and we are not going to convince Rogers or CTV to move its offices here. Mr. Hirst cites CNN in Atlanta, but in fact much of their operations are located, not surprisingly, in New York.

Rather than trying to dream up "media city" and wonder why it is not happening, Mr. Hirst should instead prescribe that we focus on industries where we Manitoba can grow from our natural advantages, being our farming, hydroelectric power, tourism, and manufacturing sectors , to name a few. In other words, he should prescribe policies that could actually work.

Manitoba can be as strong and prosperous as any province. But I would argue that it starts with deciding what we can be best at, and then making the people who create jobs in those industries feel welcome, both in an economic sense and in a social one. The media industry is not very labour intensive. There are other industries that can create tremendous prosperity for the province, and developing those industries is where we should be making good industrial policy in addition to having competitive legislation in general areas such as labour and corporate and personal taxation. Winnipeg is a great city in which to live, and one that has plenty of opportunity. Many of the people we moved here from Toronto and other parts will testify to that. All Winnipeg and Manitoba need is an industrial development plan and a commitment to see it through. At last year's City Summit, which I co-chaired with Lloyd Axworthy and Ida Albo, we saw plenty of examples of cities such as Kansas City that did just that.

In case there is any doubt, we remain committed to maintaining the head office of the company in Winnipeg, and the CanWest Global Foundation's activities will continue to reflect that. Our recent $3 million donation to the University of Winnipeg Theatre School and the fact that CanWest's Winnipeg employees are leading contributors to the United Way should confirm that, as should our many other activities here. I do not agree that Winnipeg missed what I consider to be a small and elusive opportunity in not having a "media city" here, but I do agree with Mr. Hirst that with targeted economic policy and a can-do attitude, Manitoba can reach its full potential.


Leonard Asper is president and CEO of CanWest Global Communications Corp.
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  #234  
Old Posted Aug 11, 2007, 11:54 PM
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Its good to see CanWest Global continue to invest in the city.
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  #235  
Old Posted Aug 11, 2007, 11:56 PM
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Mayor Pledges to Eliminate Business Tax at Chamber Breakfast

At a special breakfast held last week at the Fairmont Hotel sponsored by Peak of the Market Winnipeg Mayor Sam Katz outlined his formal response to the Economic Opportunity Commission report. The Chamber was delighted to hear that after being in existence for close to a century, Mayor Katz has promised to eliminate the business tax within six years.

http://www.samkatz.ca/pdf/Chamber%20speech.pdf

----------------------------------------------------------

Great news!!! .... this will pay big dividends to the city economy.


.... now where did I put those moving boxes.
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  #236  
Old Posted Aug 12, 2007, 2:50 AM
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what no post from the buisnes pages about newflyer...
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  #237  
Old Posted Aug 12, 2007, 4:33 AM
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Mneh, we need to get rid of the payroll tax too! Then we can start seeing real investment.
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  #238  
Old Posted Aug 14, 2007, 1:58 AM
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Mneh, we need to get rid of the payroll tax too! Then we can start seeing real investment.
... oh you can read my mind. Eliminate the payroll tax and the capital tax ... and this city and province would be on the economic fast track on the backs of private investment. Both those taxes reduces the incentive to invest in new businesses and expand current ones, which also deters the development of new properties.

I am very pleased that the City is on side .. and looking to develop the local economy through business expansion and economic growth. Both the payroll tax and the capital tax are provincal .. and since Manitoba just embraced the NDP I just don't see any progress on that front for another 4 years. It woul be nice if Manitoba had a pro-business government but instead it will be locked in the big government status quo track to no where, but excuses.
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  #239  
Old Posted Aug 14, 2007, 12:17 PM
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Great sales at the "bus company", but poor profits :<

New Flyer looks for ways to boost unitholder value


Tue Aug 14 2007




THE CEO of bus maker New Flyer Industries Inc. says the company's board is looking at how to boost unitholder value after non-cash charges and income tax provisions drove the firm deep into the red during the second quarter.
"The board is currently looking at all the available options to best execute an enhanced unit value for the company and we expect that review to be concluded no later than our October board meeting," John Marinucci told analysts in a conference call Monday.

Those choices could include paying down company debt or buying back units.

Winnipeg-based New Flyer -- which makes heavy-duty buses used for public transit, airports and park-and-ride services -- posted a second-quarter loss of US$84.9 million on Friday, reversing a year-ago profit of $7.2 million.

Net income was wiped out by non-cash charges for future income taxes, as the federal government will start taxing income trusts like regular corporations as of 2011.
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  #240  
Old Posted Aug 14, 2007, 11:25 PM
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Originally Posted by wags_in_the_peg View Post
Great sales at the "bus company", but poor profits :<

New Flyer looks for ways to boost unitholder value


Tue Aug 14 2007




THE CEO of bus maker New Flyer Industries Inc. says the company's board is looking at how to boost unitholder value after non-cash charges and income tax provisions drove the firm deep into the red during the second quarter.
"The board is currently looking at all the available options to best execute an enhanced unit value for the company and we expect that review to be concluded no later than our October board meeting," John Marinucci told analysts in a conference call Monday.

Those choices could include paying down company debt or buying back units.

Winnipeg-based New Flyer -- which makes heavy-duty buses used for public transit, airports and park-and-ride services -- posted a second-quarter loss of US$84.9 million on Friday, reversing a year-ago profit of $7.2 million.

Net income was wiped out by non-cash charges for future income taxes, as the federal government will start taxing income trusts like regular corporations as of 2011.
I believe these numbers included one time writedowns of assests. We will have to see how they do next quarter.. with there order book filled for years ahead.
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