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  #281  
Old Posted Oct 24, 2010, 11:14 PM
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Originally Posted by patriotizzy View Post
I've got a question. So the high lines are being made into neat parks, but what happens under the highline (next to the roads)? Do they leave it as ugly as before? I would much rather have them tear down the high line and just build parks on their footprints. I don't know though, maybe someone can shed some light for me.

You'd have to acquire private land, shut down sections of street - and you wouldn't have a cool park up in the air, elevated from the hustle & bustle of the city below.

Last edited by wrab; Oct 24, 2010 at 11:50 PM.
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  #282  
Old Posted Oct 24, 2010, 11:47 PM
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Originally Posted by patriotizzy View Post
I've got a question. So the high lines are being made into neat parks, but what happens under the highline (next to the roads)? Do they leave it as ugly as before? I would much rather have them tear down the high line and just build parks on their footprints. I don't know though, maybe someone can shed some light for me.
As NYGuy said, the spaces will be turned into usable ones, but there's less public access under the high line then you think. Almost all the buildings lining the high line own the land under it, so in most cases it is occupied,
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  #283  
Old Posted Oct 25, 2010, 3:50 AM
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^^^^ I see. I was never really opposed to the elevated park innovation, I was always a little curious to how they came about. I do love the designs and the beauty they bring to cities. Thanks for the response guys.
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  #284  
Old Posted Nov 8, 2010, 6:15 PM
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OK, on topic but off topic because it's not development related (moderators, feel free to ix-nay this post)

Pee-wee Herman was on the High Line in a video for Funny or Die. The antics start at 2:05:

http://www.funnyordie.com/videos/2ac...foursquare-day
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  #285  
Old Posted Nov 9, 2010, 3:03 AM
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LOL, I forgot that guy existed.
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  #286  
Old Posted Nov 9, 2010, 6:10 PM
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LOL, I forgot that guy existed.
Off topic: Paul Rubens had moved away from the character, but brought him back this past year. First, with a show in LA (resurrecting the Playhouse show that he used to perform with the likes of the late Phil Harman - before he was on TV) and now in NYC as you can see from the video.

End of the off-topic stuff.
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  #287  
Old Posted Nov 11, 2010, 12:51 AM
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http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2010/1...commission.php

Twisty MePa Tower Gets Sliced & Diced by Landmarks Commission


The view along Washington Street. Well, not anymore.

Wednesday, November 10, 2010, by Pete Davies

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Architect Morris Adjmi's bold plan for a new office building sprouting out of an old Meatpacking District warehouse at 837 Washington Street got some love from the Landmarks Preservation Commission yesterday, but not enough to get the project to second base.

The commissioners praised the design but found it wrong for the Gansevoort Market Historic District, instructed developer Taconic Investment Partners to sharpen its butcher's knife. Despite a stack of supportive letters from nearby property owners and positive testimony from the Romanoff family, whose site kitty-korner across Washington Street just outside the historic district has been approved for a new 200' tower, the LPC sided with community naysayers who were against the 8-story plan.

Adjmi and adviser Bill Higgins together laid out the genesis of the torqued framework as an expression of the movement and flow of people and goods through the area as it grew from a small village to a center of commerce. But the commissioners thought the 100' building to be too tall for the two-story base that would hold it. They asked for precedent in the area that would allow for such a plan, but the cited examples were all outside the historic district. The design team explained that the idea for the grid of steel beams, rotating slightly around a taller brick core, was born from the way city streets come together on this block at Washington and West 13th Street.

This is where the old downtown street grid, running diagonally across the lower part of Manhattan, intersects with the later 1811 Plan that created the familiar orthogonal grid of streets covering Manhattan to the north. Still, no dice, so it's back to the drawing board, with the development team trying to figure out a way to build something dynamic and new while constrained by the restrictive rules and the context of the low-slung warehouses that line the streets of the historic district. New plans will be drawn up, but no date has been set for a repeat performance.









High Line views

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  #288  
Old Posted Nov 11, 2010, 1:12 AM
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Imbeciles.

Copied and pasted from Curbed NY: "8 stories is a bit extreme. It should be 6. Now if it started at 10, that too would be extreme, and more appropriate would be 8. But it started at 8, so it should be 6. Yeah. That's about right."—anon [Twisty MePa Tower Gets Sliced & Diced by Landmarks Commission]


Another case in point that the developer should always present an exagerrated proposal with the almost guaranteed kneejerk reaction from commitees and nimby's insisting to lop off a few floors will get the developer and architect exactly what they really had in mind. The nimby/cantankerous commitee folks think they've won and the developer wins. Everybody's happy!

Seriously though, how could anyone complain about this proposal??? Morris Adjmi is one of my favorite NY architects.
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  #289  
Old Posted Nov 11, 2010, 1:37 PM
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Seriously though, how could anyone complain about this proposal??? Morris Adjmi is one of my favorite NY architects.
It's a law of nature. For every new proposal, there must be at least one group of people outraged over the "size" of said development, or the general "newness" of it all.
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  #290  
Old Posted Nov 11, 2010, 2:17 PM
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http://www.observer.com/2010/real-es...eighbors-abhor

The High Line's Would-Be Neighbor That the Neighbors Abhor



By Matt Chaban
November 10, 2010

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The High Line has become the backbone of the city's best architecture, this generation's Park Avenue. From the Standard Hotel to Nouvel's 100 11th, from Frank Gehry's IAC HQ to HL23, the High Line—itself an exquisite work of architecture and landscaping—has won a reputation as the best spot to build stunning new structures, as well as the best place to gaze upon them.

The elevated park nearly got another high-flying neighbor yesterday at 837 Washington Street, a lot across the cobblestoned road from the Standard Hotel, though the proposal was ultimately turned down by the city's Landmarks Preservation Commission.

The new office building, being developed by Tacononic Investments, is designed by Morris Adjmi, the architect of the nearby High Line Building, which is, along with the Standard, the only edifice that will ever overhang the park. 837 Washington is currently a two-story meatpacking building, and Admji has proposed a torquing glass-and steel tower atop it, creating an unusual design that nods to both the Manhattan street grid laid out in 1811 (paralleled by the building's top) and the older, confusing-even-to-natives streets of Greenwich Village (the bottom).

"I think this building tries to be a metaphor for what's happening in the Meatpacking District," Adjmi told The Observer Monday. "It's a very modern structure of glass encased within a steel lattice that nods to the High Line and the area's industrial past." Plus, the original 1938 Art Deco meatpacking building remains relatively intact, instead of being demolished.

It would be a ravishing addition to the neighborhood, and might even be taller than its proposed eight-stories, were it not located in a historic district—one created to head off over-development such as that created by the Gansevoort Hotel and the Bumble and Bumble Building, both built before the area received historic status.

Adjmi presented the project to the commission yesterday, and while it won praise from some local developers, preservationists were bothered by the proposal. The biggest issue seemed to be that the building's height—many others in the district are much shorter, like the building currently at 837 Washington—that and Taconic's desire to replace a building deemed a contributing piece of the Gansevoort Market Historic District when it was established in 2003. At the time, the commission said it was an exemplary building from the market's latter day architecture.

"The existing landmarked building is once again merely playing base to a grandiose, out of context structure, and that is not the role of a contributing building in an historic district," Nadezhda Williams of the Historic District's Council argued in her testimony to the commission. Andrew Berman of the Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation told The Observer that the building actually had "an interesting design." Still, there's that whole height issue. "The big thing for us is a seven-story addition dwarfing a one-and-a-half-story contributing building," Berman said.

The commission seemed to agree, telling Adjmi he should come back soon with a shorter proposal.
"I don't know how I'm ever going to get to the size making any sense at all," Commissioner Elizabeth Ryan said. The commissioners were, however, impressed with the marriage of new and old and did not seem bent on ensuring the building remains as is. The architect argued that his building, being located on the border of the district, and just across the street from its taller neighbors, could serve as a transition, but even this argument did not fly.

In reality, though, this may all be part of the plan. From St. Vincent's aborted hospital to 980 Madison, developers know full well to push the limits as much as possible at the commission. That way, when they return months later with their relatively more conservative proposals, they can, typically, be easily approved.
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  #291  
Old Posted Dec 9, 2010, 3:49 AM
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Rolling on the High Line


View of the High Line lawn from HL23. (Image: Diana Darling)


12.08.10
Julie V. Iovine

Quote:
We were scouting cool party spaces recently and caught this view from Neil Denari’s HL23 on the High Line. Lower floors of the 14-story condo, now nearing completion, are going to feel pretty vulnerable to nose-pressers strolling up the rail-bed park who will be just feet away from their living room glass walls. But on the upper floors, views of the length of High Line will unfurl as alluringly as the Yellow Brick Road. Right now, it’s possible to make out the stretch of emerald lawn section at 23rd Street, waiting for its sunbathers.
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  #292  
Old Posted Dec 9, 2010, 4:01 AM
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when will the 2nd part of high line open?
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  #293  
Old Posted Dec 9, 2010, 4:45 AM
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when will the 2nd part of high line open?
Late spring or summer next year. All of these park openings seem to be delayed a little, so I wouldn't expect it until the summer. The third and final stretch of the High Line is years down the line because it involves the railyards development.
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  #294  
Old Posted Dec 10, 2010, 12:53 AM
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Great progress. Will love the day when I can walk on the entire High Line. This is the final phase, right?
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  #295  
Old Posted Dec 10, 2010, 2:20 AM
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Great progress. Will love the day when I can walk on the entire High Line. This is the final phase, right?
nope the 2nd part is next, he 3rd and final phase will come with the completion of the Hudson Yards.
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  #296  
Old Posted Dec 16, 2010, 1:33 AM
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http://www.observer.com/2010/real-es...-rink-standard

Not to Be Outdone, Balasz Building Ice Rink at Standard



By Matt Chaban
December 15, 2010

Quote:
Yesterday we broke the news that downtown was getting its first ice rink, at the appropriately named W Hotel Downtown.

Well, it looks like there will be two rinks south of 14th this season, if not more. Curbed reports that the Standard Hotel is turning its patio into a rink, as well.

The Standard Hotel pulled in its yellow patio furniture for the winter, and you'd better believe that Andre Balazs is not letting that prime space go to waste. After all, he put two nightclubs on the top floor.

Interestingly, this means there will now be two places to ice skate on Washington Street where once there were none. No word yet on whether patrons will be forbidden to drink or wear clothes on the Standard's ice.
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  #297  
Old Posted Jan 21, 2011, 2:22 AM
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The new viewing window





Lots of interesting art pieces on the high line.

My Photostream: http://www.flickr.com/photos/34734039@N04/

Last edited by JSsocal; Jan 21, 2011 at 5:21 AM.
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  #298  
Old Posted Jan 21, 2011, 5:09 AM
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As seen in the photos above...

http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2011/0...glassed_up.php
14th Street's High Line Building Now All Glassed Up



January 20, 2011, by Joey Arak

Quote:
Only two building are allowed to hover directly over the High Line, and one of them sure is taking its sweet time.

The High Line Building at 450 West 14th Street has been under construction just north of the Standard Hotel (the other High Line straddler) for so long that our Curbed Inside peek was back in 2009.

But now the office building, designed by Morris Adjmi, is glassy as heck. How's she looking? Maybe not quite as clean and transparent as we expected, but the first batch of renderings really played up the glass at the expense of the steel. As for future occupants, we haven't heard anything new since Helmut Lang signed on for two floors. Any fresh intel?





The base (an old meatpacking plant) is still under wraps. Here's a pic from the High Line.




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  #299  
Old Posted Jan 21, 2011, 11:54 AM
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The rendering and reality seems fairly identical. How far along are they on phase 2?
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  #300  
Old Posted Jan 31, 2011, 4:27 PM
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http://online.wsj.com/article/SB1000...949330602.html
'Great Theater' on the High Line





By DANA RUBINSTEIN
January 31, 2011

Quote:
When a designer from Morris Adjmi Architects descended into the basement of 450 W. 14th St., now a 10-story glass box built atop a masonry base pierced through by the High Line, he found a grisly reminder of the building's original purpose: approximately five-dozen 50-gallon drums filled with the remnants of animal carcasses.

The building's drab, five-story art-deco masonry base, completed in 1932, two years before the railroad now known as the High Line, once served as a frozen-storage facility for the meatpacking industry. Trains would pull into the building and stop, allowing workers to haul frozen carcasses, hanging from hooks, onto train cars, before rumbling on to their next destination.

Seven years ago, when Morris Adjmi architects was hired to design a tower for the site, the five-story masonry base was largely derelict. But the architects, enamored of its history, chose to keep it and build a 10-story glass addition on top.


Structurally, that was something of a challenge. According to Mr. Adjmi, the building is the only one along the High Line to share key structural elements with the train track. In other words, the columns and the trusses that support the building are the same columns and trusses that support the track that passes through what would be its second story.

After using ultrasound technology to determine the strength of the foundation, the architects decided to build a light-weight glass-and-steel tower on top of the masonry base.

The inspiration for the design was Rachel Whiteread's "Monument," in Trafalgar Square. The sculpture featured an upside-down, clear-resin facsimile of a stone plinth placed on top of the actual fourth plinth of Trafalgar Square.

Like "Monument," Mr. Adjmi built a translucent top, in this case a 10-story, glass-and-steel office tower, which echoes the opaque, rectangular, masonry base below.

The result is a staid, elegant building, one whose restraint is underscored by the raucous architecture surrounding it. Directly to the south, the tome-shaped Standard Hotel hovers on concrete stilts above the High Line. To the east there's the headquarters of fashion designer Diane von Furstenberg, a red-brick building sprouting a flagrantly modern, prismatic glass atrium. (Ms. von Furstenberg is also an investor in 450 West 14th Street, which is being developed by Charles Blaichman, of CB Developers.)

The tower's design eschews excess flourishes. The existing masonry base boasts a restored art deco parapet. The north and south facades of the glass skyscraper, meanwhile, bear four-story indentations, as though a giant pair of fingers had gently pressed in the glass. The angle of the indentations mimics the angle at which the High Line passes through the building below.

On Friday morning, the office tower offered dazzling views of Manhattan and masses of ice swirling along the Hudson River. It also offers views of another sort.

To the south, construction workers routinely witness the now-notorious couplings of the curtain-challenged guests at the Standard. To the north, fashion models can frequently be spotted traipsing into Milk Studios.

In the words of Jordan Rogove, a Morris Adjmi architect, the building offers "great theater."
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