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  #21  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2022, 12:49 PM
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Originally Posted by James Bond Agent 007 View Post
Nashville, Indiana

Not really sure about Missouri - Hermann, maybe?
Perhaps Hermann for 19th century and Ste. Genevieve for 18th century towns.
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  #22  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2022, 1:41 PM
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With 40 million people living in California there are going to be a lot of "pretty villages" around the state. Avalon qualifies as a village, the population is only 3,400. The setting is very pretty. It's nestled in a coastal ravine with a safe harbor, on an island, accessible by boat and cars are restricted.


https://lostwaldo.com/10-cutest-small-towns-in-america/
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  #23  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2022, 4:57 PM
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Originally Posted by lrt's friend View Post

For the western part of Quebec, I would say Wakefield.
It depends on how we define the western part of Quebec. If we're talking about the Outaouais-Abitibi-Témiscamingue as western Quebec, then yes no town beats Wakefield:

https://www.google.com/maps/@46.7659...7i16384!8i8192

Montebello would be the runner-up:

https://www.google.com/search?q=mont...A_enCA931CA931

But if the western part of Quebec includes the Laurentians, then a number of towns there might top Wakefield.
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  #24  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2022, 5:08 PM
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For Quebec as a whole, it's hard to pick.

I'd say that no human settlement in province is prettier on the whole than Quebec City is, but it's way above the threshold of the thread as it has hundreds of thousands of people.

In terms of smaller places, one thing I've found in thinking about this thread is that a lot of them look the same. You typically have a large, imposing Catholic church (often stone) in the centre, surrounded by a number of heritage buildings related to the church (like the presbytère, where the priest would live). Often there are also large old college or seminary-style buildings with classic architecture. Then you have a cluster of old French-style homes in the mansarde style, or in the Canadien (Québécois) style with prominent sloping roofs that were developed by the colonists in response to heavy snow collapsing flat roofs.

Whether a town or village is pretty or not is generally dependent on how much of this stuff it has (and its geographic setting), but generally it's mostly the same vernacular repeated in every community.

In terms of towns, I do like St-Sauveur, north of Montreal in the Laurentians (it's actually become something of a resort suburb of the city):

https://www.google.com/search?q=sain...A_enCA931CA931

Baie-St-Paul is a bit further afield in the Charlevoix region, northeast of Quebec City:

https://www.google.com/search?q=baie...ih=577&dpr=1.5

Technically speaking Mont-Tremblant is probably the prettiest small town in Quebec (and even a bit beyond) but it was built from scratch to look like this, so not sure that it counts:

https://www.google.com/search?q=mont...A_enCA931CA931
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  #25  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2022, 6:54 PM
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In Quebec, I submit Kamouraska in the bas-du-fleuve region. Before the river turns into a gulf, the sunrises and sunsets are remarkable, and the architecture very pleasant.

In the Eastern Townships, North Hatley is a sweet looking place on Lake Massawipi.
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  #26  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2022, 7:01 PM
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Originally Posted by montréaliste View Post
In Quebec, I submit Kamouraska in the bas-du-fleuve region. Before the river turns into a gulf, the sunrises and sunsets are remarkable, and the architecture very pleasant.

In the Eastern Townships, North Hatley is a sweet looking place on Lake Massawipi.
Hatley is nicer than North Hatley, just not on the lake.

Eaton Corner is our closest equivalent to Woodstock, VT. Nearly every building is straight from the 1800s.

https://qahn.org/exhibit/architectur...s-eaton-corner
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  #27  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2022, 7:03 PM
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
For Quebec as a whole, it's hard to pick.

I'd say that no human settlement in province is prettier on the whole than Quebec City is, but it's way above the threshold of the thread as it has hundreds of thousands of people.
Depends if the metric is the average or the cherry-picked best.

I just dropped a Google Street View pin randomly in Quebec City and I would have bet a million bucks it wouldn't be anywhere near as pretty as (basically anywhere in) Woodstock, Vermont:

https://www.google.com/maps/@46.8557...7i13312!8i6656

(dropped at random, no kidding!)

But of course it's apples to oranges; Quebec City is a functioning city, not a tiny village that can afford to obsess over architectural preservation and homogeneity.
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  #28  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2022, 8:53 PM
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Originally Posted by lio45 View Post
Depends if the metric is the average or the cherry-picked best.

I just dropped a Google Street View pin randomly in Quebec City and I would have bet a million bucks it wouldn't be anywhere near as pretty as (basically anywhere in) Woodstock, Vermont:

https://www.google.com/maps/@46.8557...7i13312!8i6656

(dropped at random, no kidding!)

But of course it's apples to oranges; Quebec City is a functioning city, not a tiny village that can afford to obsess over architectural preservation and homogeneity.
Sorry, should have been more precise and referred to the innermost, older parts of Quebec City!
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  #29  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2022, 9:05 PM
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Hatley is nicer than North Hatley, just not on the lake.

Eaton Corner is our closest equivalent to Woodstock, VT. Nearly every building is straight from the 1800s.

https://qahn.org/exhibit/architectur...s-eaton-corner
I explored Eaton Corner and it doesn't turn my crank.

Or hold a candle to Woodstock VT, except maybe when it comes to the age of the buildings.
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  #30  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2022, 9:11 PM
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
Sorry, should have been more precise and referred to the innermost, older parts of Quebec City!
No, that was obvious. My point was about whether we should "penalize" the nicer parts by not ignoring the average. I'm on the fence about this.

Say the walled old core (the part of Quebec City that's an UNESCO World Heritage Site) got magically teleported to the middle of cultivated fields, the way you often see with medieval villages in France or Germany (urban perimeter hasn't changed in 1000 years, zero sprawl), then yeah, obviously, that's a top contender for a super well preserved functional small town.

If you gathered all the buildings in Queens NY that are from the 1700s and early 1800s and put them together in the middle of nowhere in NY State, you'd create a little village that would certainly rival Woodstock VT, but since they're diluted, it doesn't really count, right? That's the point I'm trying to make.
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  #31  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2022, 9:12 PM
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
I explored Eaton Corner and it doesn't turn my crank.
I don't think the street view does it justice. I've been there in person a few times

But yeah, it's... linear. And significantly smaller than Woodstock. (I keep referring to Woodstock because I find it to be the gold standard for a "time capsule" town.)

I challenge you to find a better time capsule Quebec village than Eaton Corner though. (I'll be super interested in it, if I'm proven wrong! )
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  #32  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2022, 9:16 PM
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No, that was obvious. My point was about whether we should "penalize" the nicer parts by not ignoring the average. I'm on the fence about this.

Say the walled old core (the part of Quebec City that's an UNESCO World Heritage Site) got magically teleported to the middle of cultivated fields, the way you often see with medieval villages in France or Germany (urban perimeter hasn't changed in 1000 years, zero sprawl), then yeah, obviously, that's a top contender for a super well preserved functional small town.

If you gathered all the buildings in Queens NY that are from the 1700s and early 1800s and put them together in the middle of nowhere in NY State, you'd create a little village that would certainly rival Woodstock VT, but since they're diluted, it doesn't really count, right? That's the point I'm trying to make.
I can definitely see your point, though the difference is that in (old) Quebec City they're all bunched together in a continguous, homogenous district right now - even if the rest of the city is more modern and not exactly charming.

Whereas in Queens the older buildings are all over the place interspersed with a whole bunch of other styles of buildings.

There is no comparable historico-architectural "feel" there.
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  #33  
Old Posted Jan 18, 2022, 9:42 PM
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I can definitely see your point, though the difference is that in (old) Quebec City they're all bunched together in a continguous, homogenous district right now - even if the rest of the city is more modern and not exactly charming.

Whereas in Queens the older buildings are all over the place interspersed with a whole bunch of other styles of buildings.

There is no comparable historico-architectural "feel" there.
Even the walled core is still far from as homogeneous as "gold standard" Woodstock

That new-ish condo building on the corner of Haldimand Street (visible in this view, on the left) for example. And brutalist Édifice G looming in the background is also something you won't see in Woodstock

https://www.google.com/maps/@46.8120...7i16384!8i8192

Again, it's understandable, it's a living city, metro area of nearly 1M people, it's not a museum, nor can it afford to be as heritage-obsessed as a place like Woodstock (where, I'm almost sure, most residents are really proud of their lil time capsule village, and deservedly so).
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  #34  
Old Posted Jan 19, 2022, 6:35 AM
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Originally Posted by SAN Man View Post
With 40 million people living in California there are going to be a lot of "pretty villages" around the state. Avalon qualifies as a village, the population is only 3,400. The setting is very pretty. It's nestled in a coastal ravine with a safe harbor, on an island, accessible by boat and cars are restricted.


https://lostwaldo.com/10-cutest-small-towns-in-america/
Yes, Avalon is nice, almost looks like a French or Italian Riviera village, or a Greek island village with a more eclectic architecture and less whitewash. The Casino is a great building. Hard to believe its only 20 miles from L.A./Long Beach harbors where all the cargo ships are lined up.

Also like Laguna Beach, Coronado and Idyllwild in SoCal; Pismo Beach, Solvang, Cambria and Carmel in central CA; Mendocino and Ferndale in NorCal. In the Sierra gold country, Sonora, Angel's Camp and Nevada City are great and historic, and Downieville is a tiny village (292 people) with old buildings and beauty and quiet. Ditto with Markleville in Alpine County. Finally, deep in the Trinity Alps of far northwestern CA is the historic mining village of Weaverville.

Last edited by CaliNative; Jan 19, 2022 at 7:52 AM.
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  #35  
Old Posted Jan 19, 2022, 2:46 PM
Don't Be That Guy Don't Be That Guy is offline
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Originally Posted by Acajack View Post
For Quebec as a whole, it's hard to pick.

Baie-St-Paul is a bit further afield in the Charlevoix region, northeast of Quebec City:

https://www.google.com/search?q=baie...ih=577&dpr=1.5

Technically speaking Mont-Tremblant is probably the prettiest small town in Quebec (and even a bit beyond) but it was built from scratch to look like this, so not sure that it counts:
There's a lot of the province that I haven't seen, but Baie-St-Paul is hands down the prettiest little town that I've visited in Quebec. The Charlevoix in general is probably one of the most underrated tourist destinations in eastern North America - such a beautiful area. Picks for other places include:

Deleware - Lewes
Pennsylvania - Lititz or Ligonier. I can't decide.
North Carolina - Highlands
Virginia - Culpepper
Tennessee - Jonesborough
Kentucky - Bardstown
Minnesota - Stillwater
Arizona - Cottonwood or Bisbee. The scenery in Sedona is stunning, but the town itself is extremely auto-centric and underwhelming IMO.
West Virginia - Shepherdstown
California - Almost too many to choose from. Carmel, Sonoma, Nevada City, Avalon, Healdsburg, St. Helena...
England - Just pick a spot in the Cotswolds

Last edited by Don't Be That Guy; Jan 19, 2022 at 6:45 PM.
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  #36  
Old Posted Jan 19, 2022, 3:30 PM
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Pennsylvania - New Hope is the prettiest village or town I think in PA.... followed closely by Jim Thorpe

New Jersey - Cape May by far

Delaware - Rehoboth Beach by far
PA: I drove through Lititz last year and was gobsmacked by not only how pretty it was, but how new development on the outskirts of town was being incorporated into the existing town center. Even though suburban, it felt very walkable even as you drove outward.

New Hope is very pretty but it doesn't feel vibrant enough to me. It's one main street. Lambertville across the river feels more authentically like a "town".

If we're considering bigger "towns", to me its hard to beat Lancaster.

New Jersey: Agreed on Cape May

Delaware: It seems odd to choose Rehoboth over Lewes. Lewes has managed to maintain much more of a town feel while Rehoboth is just sprawling in every direction everywhere.
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  #37  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2022, 3:20 AM
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  #38  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2022, 3:35 AM
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Originally Posted by CaliNative View Post
Yes, Avalon is nice, almost looks like a French or Italian Riviera village, or a Greek island village with a more eclectic architecture and less whitewash. The Casino is a great building. Hard to believe its only 20 miles from L.A./Long Beach harbors where all the cargo ships are lined up.

Also like Laguna Beach, Coronado and Idyllwild in SoCal; Pismo Beach, Solvang, Cambria and Carmel in central CA; Mendocino and Ferndale in NorCal. In the Sierra gold country, Sonora, Angel's Camp and Nevada City are great and historic, and Downieville is a tiny village (292 people) with old buildings and beauty and quiet. Ditto with Markleville in Alpine County. Finally, deep in the Trinity Alps of far northwestern CA is the historic mining village of Weaverville.
Sounds about right.
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  #39  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2022, 4:27 AM
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I would actually say Strasburg is prettier than Lititz in Pennsylvania, but Lititz is up there. I've never been there, but Milford is supposedly also a candidate for prettiest in Pennsylvania.
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  #40  
Old Posted Jan 20, 2022, 4:59 AM
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Utah has a lot of towns located in beautiful areas but for the most part, the towns themselves aren't very attractive.

Like, Kanab, Utah (pop. 4,636) has gorgeous views of the rocks of Southern Utah, but the city itself is pretty bland and lacks a lot of historic architecture:



Moab is a bit better in this regard. It has a fairly historic Main Street - but really, beyond that the town pretty low density.

So, that leaves Park City. I think Park City fits the bill and they've done a good job preserving the style of the community. It's probably the coolest/prettiest town in Utah:







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