HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForum About
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Global Projects & Construction > City Compilations


Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #3801  
Old Posted Oct 10, 2020, 5:43 PM
ILUVSAT's Avatar
ILUVSAT ILUVSAT is offline
May the Schwartz be w/ U!
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Location: S.A. | Nashville
Posts: 960
Quote:
Originally Posted by BnaBreaker View Post
You say "cost prohibitive," I say "scared to spend money"... potato/potato.
Ha. Funny.

That is an apples-to-oranges comparison. "Cost prohibitive" and "scared to spend" are mutually exclusive. You must rally know that and are simply pulling my leg...I hope.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3802  
Old Posted Oct 11, 2020, 12:40 AM
Texcitement Texcitement is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 90
Quote:
Originally Posted by ILUVSAT View Post
Ha. Funny.

That is an apples-to-oranges comparison. "Cost prohibitive" and "scared to spend" are mutually exclusive. You must rally know that and are simply pulling my leg...I hope.
Actually, they're NOT mutually exclusive. On the contrary, they're very likely the same. If a project does NOT look feasible on paper (running the numbers etc.) then an investor would be wise to avoid it, or scared off. No?

The only companies that consistently build the very tall towers in "ANYtown USA" outside of NYC are financial firms, at least up until recently. Suddenly, it appears they're into the diversification and relocation game too. Look at Charlotte, where it was cheap for banks to camp and hire talent off each other for decades. It's been a great alternative to NYC and SF. But even now, those firms are both fewer in number and learning that their employees are 'backroom' and can work from home or a warehouse building in the burbs or even worse, offshored. Even Wall Street is seeing an exodus. The forces that built the tall towers in midsized cities like Charlotte are now going to lowrise buildings in cornfields and smaller cities where it truly is cheaper.

For the next decade, the taller towers - and they won't be the tallest in those cities - will be cities with the strongest and biggest downtown population growth. Nashville falls right in there, but those buildings won't be 40-60 story office towers.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3803  
Old Posted Oct 12, 2020, 3:08 PM
Rhodium Rhodium is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Feb 2018
Posts: 203
^Also, a lot of the tall towers in Charlotte were historically built by homegrown companies. To be honest, we might not see another 600 ft+ building after Duke Energy II for while unless there's a major relocation.

Edit: Even if some companies start to build elsewhere, there's always gonna be a demand for talent-cluster cities. Because professionals tend to job-hop to boost their salary. I see it all the time here.

Last edited by Rhodium; Oct 12, 2020 at 3:24 PM.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3804  
Old Posted Oct 12, 2020, 11:33 PM
MidTenn1's Avatar
MidTenn1 MidTenn1 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Nashville
Posts: 1,047
As I've always noted, the strong point regarding Nashville's skyline is not so much it's height, but it's breadth. As the screen cap below shows, the urban high-rise area is 25 blocks long stretching into a booming Midtown/Music Row/Vanderbilt district.



Video Source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wmiW0A5i6OU

Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3805  
Old Posted Oct 13, 2020, 4:42 PM
Dariusb Dariusb is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Belton, TX
Posts: 654
^Wow!
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3806  
Old Posted Oct 15, 2020, 7:29 PM
PillowTalk4 PillowTalk4 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Greater Wasshington, DC
Posts: 357
Quote:
Originally Posted by watchmanonthewall View Post
To me personally this is not the best news. I live in the Nashville metro area and have been ecstatic over the growth Nashville has experienced. Being born in the 50s, I remember when for years the LC tower was the focal point of downtown. Then we got the batman and again went though a long period of not much activity. Sometime during the Bredesen administration things really took off. Obviously the last several years have been phenomenal. However, in my opinion, the skyline is starting to flatten out. These clusters developing around the lower Broadway area ( SoBro, The Gulch, Midtown, etc.. and even The Yards ) are starting to pull the eye away from the center of downtown because we are sort of stuck in this range of medium tall buildings. My personal opinion is that Nashville needs to break the 700 to 800 foot barrier soon or it runs the risk of becoming SanDiego, Vancouver, etc... These are beautiful cities but moving around them you sort of lose the sense of their true depth of development because without those sky piercing towers like many cities have in the center I believe you lose that wow/majestic sort of feel that should exemplify the status due a large, important, city. Does anyone else agree, or do you think I am making something out of nothing? I hope that I live long enough to see the skyline pulled back to the center with one or two marquee structures. No disrespect to anyone meant to anyone living anywhere else intended.
I agree. I love Vancouver and it's a city that for a long time its tallest buildings were primarily in the 20, 25, 30 story range with some 40 story and I believe one 50 story building. While there are some absolutely beautiful vistas of Vancouver, it did appear to be very horizontal even with as many towers as they have. However, in the last 5-10 years, there's been some additions to their skyline that are in the 60+ story category and more buildings in the 45+ story range. Those additions have added drastically to their skyline in that it caused me to be drawn to several focal points and examine their skyline from various perspectives.

Should developers really be concerned about that when building in Nashville? Probably not. I wish that they would . But, I just don't see that happening. Mind you, Nashville's skyline is far better than it's ever been and I can see buildings in the 20, 30, 40 story range at the truck stop property off I-24 adding to the skyline in a way in which it's not clustered with downtown and should provide a nice view as you drive south beyond the I-65/I-24 split. As you travel north bound on 1-24 and as you cross over the Cumberland, the addition of towers along I-24 will give more depth to the skyline and draw your eyes into different areas. The stadium want be the primary focal point. It'll be even more expansive if the River North development comes to fruition the way that it has been designed to include multiple 20 to 30 story buildings.

I don't see Nashville getting an office building that will be in the 50, 60 or 70 story range anytime soon. As already stated by someone else, most companies just aren't interested in those size buildings anymore unless they intend to get into the office leasing business. If any company that is locating in Nashville was going to do that it would have been Amazon. But they chose to go with two 20+ story buildings instead. Hotel wise Nashville is probably going to level off with major hotel construction. Especially luxury brands that tend to lean towards tall structures. So, I don't see a hotel announcing a 50 to 60 story property in Nashville. Hope I'm wrong. So, that leaves residential. Should Nashville continue to grow population wise and should the city continue to promote downtown living, that is probably where Nashville might see a major tower or two in the 50 - 60 story range. Which brings me back to Vancouver, their tallest building is a mixed use building that is 62 stories and 659 feet. The first 15 floors are a hotel and remaining floors are condo's. The second tallest is 63 floors and 616 feet, but it's all hotel. So, I think Nashville's future tallest is going to be a mix use tower or all residential. The question is where will it be, should that happen? The downtown core is unlikely, unless it happens in Nashville Yards. Sobro and the eastern edge of Mid-town are the mostly likely locations.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3807  
Old Posted Oct 15, 2020, 10:44 PM
Texcitement Texcitement is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Posts: 90
I think Nashville's future can be seen more in my former hometown, Austin, than other cities. So many similarities, and it has seen several very tall residential towers of late. One difference between them, is Nashville has a much more substantial midtown, which has siphoned some of the development that would have maybe been downtown. Then, Austin has the university campus area, which is becoming its own 'midtown'.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3808  
Old Posted Oct 15, 2020, 11:24 PM
jmecklenborg jmecklenborg is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 953
Quote:
Originally Posted by BnaBreaker View Post

However, I don't think we should let our admiration for skyscrapers make us lose sight of what is really important. A nice skyline is fun to have.
I moved to Nashville in 1997, right after the arena was completed. Most of the downtown entertainment was on Second Ave., not Broadway. In fact Broadway was pretty sleepy. The Korean Vets bridge wasn't there and that street hadn't been widened and that traffic circle hadn't been built. There was nothing of note over in that area other than a few strip clubs. It was impossible to imagine that the Greyhound Station would be replaced 20 years later with hotel towers.

I think the sale of the Beaman car dealership property is a big, big deal. Not only will it enable the walkable gap to be closed between downtown and Vanderbilt, it also removes a prominent anti-transit force from the equation.

I think that Nashville needs to move toward limiting vehicular access to the downtown after the pandemic. The light rail subway plan needs to come back and it needs to be even bigger, adding a second subway line under West End and Broadway, under the river, and to the stadium and East Nashville.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3809  
Old Posted Oct 16, 2020, 2:41 PM
watchmanonthewall watchmanonthewall is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2004
Posts: 23
I don't have a plan to relieve the congestion because I'm not an engineer or city planner but something is definitely going to have to be done to address increasing traffic into Nashville's central core. A top notch public transport system seems best to me. I suspect the problem will become larger than a bus system can handle.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3810  
Old Posted Oct 16, 2020, 4:51 PM
MidTenn1's Avatar
MidTenn1 MidTenn1 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Nashville
Posts: 1,047
Quote:
Originally Posted by MidTenn1 View Post
This Oxblue cam gives a good view of the excavation for the Live at Nashville Yards entertainment district.

The buildings will line up like this...

According to the Nashville Post (behind paywall but quoted on Urban Planet) the developers of the AEG project are in a holding pattern until the Corona Virus Pandemic eases up...per NP/UP

Quote:
“We have elected to pause briefly before proceeding to the next phase of construction," Roth said. "With the continued significant impacts of the COVID pandemic on our business and the economy more generally, we believe that the prospects for successful completion and opening of this exciting project will be best served by waiting until we are emerging from the pandemic before proceeding with the next phase. We do not have a definitive timetable yet, but expect that conditions will allow for a start of vertical construction sometime in 2021.”
A recent construction cam view of the site..
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3811  
Old Posted Oct 16, 2020, 7:29 PM
PillowTalk4 PillowTalk4 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Greater Wasshington, DC
Posts: 357
Quote:
Originally Posted by MidTenn1 View Post
According to the Nashville Post (behind paywall but quoted on Urban Planet) the developers of the AEG project are in a holding pattern until the Corona Virus Pandemic eases up...per NP/UP



A recent construction cam view of the site..
Well, at least the property is nice and tidy. Hope it drains well. we don't need this to become the next man made lake like Lake Palmer before Broad West took over.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #3812  
Old Posted Oct 17, 2020, 12:25 PM
MidTenn1's Avatar
MidTenn1 MidTenn1 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: Nashville
Posts: 1,047
Quote:
Originally Posted by MidTenn1 View Post
According to the Nashville Post (behind paywall but quoted on Urban Planet) the developers of the AEG project are in a holding pattern until the Corona Virus Pandemic eases up...per NP/UP

A recent construction cam view of the site..
I supposed we should not be surprised as several projects in Nashville appear to be delayed due to the pandemic/economic problems. In particular, AEG (Anschutz Entertainment Group) makes their money by owning and managing major arenas and entertainment districts (including the Staples Center and surrounding development in Los Angeles) around the world, so the shutdown of tours and events has hit them hard. It should not be too surprising they want to wait for things (revenue streams) to improve.
Reply With Quote
     
     
End
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Global Projects & Construction > City Compilations
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 3:02 AM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.