HomeDiagramsDatabaseMapsForum About
     

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > City Discussions


Reply

 
Thread Tools Display Modes
     
     
  #5421  
Old Posted Apr 15, 2021, 9:17 PM
JManc's Avatar
JManc JManc is online now
Moderator
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Houston
Posts: 30,272
Quote:
Originally Posted by 10023 View Post
Well, I’m in pretty damn good shape. I’ve also apparently had Covid and those antibodies are as good as the ones from a vaccine with respect to herd immunity.
As am I but a lot of people our ages are not so it's disingenuous to claim our age groups don't need vaccinations because we ourselves simply happen to be fit/ healthy.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 10023 View Post
30 minutes is actually quite a long time to spend waiting around in a pharmacy for someone who isn’t retired.
Man, you are not that important or busy that you can't wait a half hour to get a vaccine once a year.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #5422  
Old Posted Apr 15, 2021, 9:36 PM
dktshb's Avatar
dktshb dktshb is offline
Environmental Sabotage
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: San Francisco/ Los Angeles/ Tahoe
Posts: 4,727
Quote:
Originally Posted by JManc View Post
As am I but a lot of people our ages are not so it's disingenuous to claim our age groups don't need vaccinations because we ourselves simply happen to be fit/ healthy.



Man, you are not that important or busy that you can't wait a half hour to get a vaccine once a year.
I know. Reading all his messages I have come to conclude that apparently there is a "cult of ignorance" in the United Kingdom too.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #5423  
Old Posted Apr 15, 2021, 10:15 PM
Pedestrian's Avatar
Pedestrian Pedestrian is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 17,102
Quote:
Indoor Venues Can Reopen in San Francisco, Plus…
April 14, 2021

As of Thursday, April 15, 2021, indoor live-audience events, performances and private events (such as conferences and receptions) will be allowed to resume in San Francisco, albeit at reduced capacities, and existing restrictions on other activities and gatherings will be further relaxed.

Indoor ticketed and seated events will be allowed to operate at up to 35% capacity, “as long as all participants keep their masks on except when eating or drinking in designated concessions areas away from their seats, distancing requirements can be met, and participants show proof of vaccination or a negative COVID-19 test before they enter the venue.”

In addition, venues will be allowed to create “vaccinated-only sections” with relaxed distancing requirements. And for venues operating at 15% capacity or less, with no more than 200 people in total, proof of vaccination or a negative test result will not be required.

Private events, such as meetings, conventions, and receptions, may also resume being held indoors, with up to 150 participants, as long as there is assigned seating and proof of vaccination or a negative COVID-19 test for all participants. Such events may also be held outdoors, with the same guidelines in place, with up to 300 people, or with up to 100 people without proof of vaccination or a negative COVID-19 test result for the participants.

Outdoor ticketed venues for live-audience events and performances will be allowed to expand capacity up to 50%, with proof of vaccination or a negative COVID-19 test result required if there are 4,000 or more audience members (or 100 or more audience members and food and beverages are served). In all cases, attendees must continue to wear facial coverings for the duration of all events, except when eating or drinking. And as with indoor venues, outdoor venues may create vaccinated-only sections with relaxed distancing restrictions.

While outdoor drinking and dining allowances for restaurants and bars will be expanded to allow for up to 8 people per table, and without any limitation on the number of households represented, indoor bars, wineries, breweries and distilleries that do not serve bona fide meals will remain closed.

Community centers serving seniors and adult day care will also be able to reopen to 25% capacity.

And while “strongly discouraged,” small indoor social gatherings of up to 25 people, “with face coverings on at all times” and no food or beverages being served, will be allowed, as will outdoor gatherings of up to 50 people (again with face coverings and distancing, or up to 25 people if food or drink is being consumed).
https://socketsite.com/archives/2021...nly-areas.html

"4,000 or more audience members (or 100 or more audience members and food and beverages are served)"--sounds like baseball, football, soccer to me.

In also like that there's going to be so much incentive to get vaccinated for people of all ages. CA is now vaccinating everyone 16 and above.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #5424  
Old Posted Apr 15, 2021, 10:18 PM
Pedestrian's Avatar
Pedestrian Pedestrian is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 17,102
Quote:
Originally Posted by JManc View Post
Man, you are not that important or busy that you can't wait a half hour to get a vaccine once a year.
Like I said, 30 minutes wasn't spent waiting. It was total time in and out including the 15 minutes required to be sure there was no allergic reaction--something no reputable place would allow you to avoid.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #5425  
Old Posted Apr 15, 2021, 10:42 PM
10023's Avatar
10023 10023 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: London
Posts: 19,287
Quote:
Originally Posted by dktshb View Post
I know. Reading all his messages I have come to conclude that apparently there is a "cult of ignorance" in the United Kingdom too.
No, it’s that people should be perfectly capable of assessing their own risk and acting accordingly.

The first lockdowns in March of last year made sense because we didn’t quite know what we were dealing with. By May or June we did and precautions should have been voluntary and based on individual risk.

The subsequent rules (even when restaurants/pubs in the UK were open from late July to October, they were not enjoyable) and then 6 more months of lockdowns were inexcusable and caused by the inability or unwillingness of the old or otherwise vulnerable to take appropriate precautions. And the media has pushed lies and engineered panic in order to keep people with nothing to worry about compliant. We didn’t need lockdowns, we needed common sense.
__________________
There is a cult of ignorance in the United States, and there always has been. The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that "my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge." - Isaac Asimov
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #5426  
Old Posted Apr 15, 2021, 10:45 PM
Pedestrian's Avatar
Pedestrian Pedestrian is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 17,102
Quote:
U.S. retail sales post largest gain in 10 months; weekly jobless claims fall
BY LUCIA MUTIKANI, REUTERS - 12:31 PM ET 4/15/2021

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - U.S. retail sales rose by the most in 10 months in March as Americans received additional pandemic relief checks from the government and increased COVID-19 vaccinations allowed broader economic re-engagement, cementing expectations for robust growth in the first quarter.

The brightening economic prospects were underscored by other data on Thursday showing first-time claims for unemployment benefits tumbled last week to the lowest level since March 2020, when mandatory closures of nonessential businesses were enforced to slow the spread of the first COVID-19 wave.

Though output at factories rebounded modestly last month amid a global semi-conductor chip shortage that is hurting automobile plants, manufacturing remains underpinned by the strong domestic demand. The upbeat data, which followed on the heels of recent reports showing inflation heating up, will likely not shift the Federal Reserve's ultra-easy monetary policy stance . . . .
https://www.fidelity.com/news/articl...2C21PQ-OUSBS_1
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #5427  
Old Posted Apr 15, 2021, 10:53 PM
jtown,man jtown,man is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Chicago
Posts: 3,958
Working out is key to avoiding Covid. No, going to the gym tomorrow isn't going to help you. But the data are clear: being overweight is a HUGE factor in getting a bad case of Covid.

To the earlier question about knowing people that don't want the vaccine. Almost everyone back in Arkansas that I know isn't. I don't think any of my family is to be honest. The doorman in the my building says he isn't getting it.

Compare this to kids in my classes at school. They are driving 4 hours south to get a vaccine.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #5428  
Old Posted Apr 15, 2021, 11:00 PM
Pedestrian's Avatar
Pedestrian Pedestrian is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 17,102
Quote:
Many U.S. states and cities have a growing surplus of Covid-19 vaccines as a significant percentage of Americans choose not to be inoculated. Overall, U.S. demand remains strong with 37% of people having gotten at least one dose, making the country one of the world’s leaders in vaccinations. Unfortunately, the U.S. is the world leader when it comes to coronavirus infections. And in certain U.S. states, as many as one in three shots are going unused. Those who refuse one are potentially putting those who do not at risk: Until herd immunity is reached, the chance that a new variant could circumvent existing vaccines remains real. Here is the latest on the pandemic. —David E. Rovella
Bloomberg Evening Briefing

I actually think this is over-reaction. What is true is that in certain states as much as ⅓ of the vaccine supply has not YET been used (Georgia) however it's an open question whether that's due to vaccine hesitancy or inefficiency on the part of the state's roll-out. Georgia has been a laggard from the beginning. Most states seemed to have used an average of around 80% of the vaccine they have been provided and the remaining doses are reserved in most cases as "second doses" for those who've received only the first Moderna or Pfizer dose.

In the Bay Area, now that everyone 16 and over is eligible, appointments seem to be going quickly:

COVID vaccine hunters say Bay Area slots are going quickly as 'open season' arrives

One the other hand, in Arizona I do note the daily injections seem stuck in the upper 50,000s while nationally they keep going higher. I don't know if this is because of supply limitations or because your tough, independent Arizonan wants to face the virus without help. It is true that Arizona has a bit more vaccine on hand than average at 21.4% of what it has been provided.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #5429  
Old Posted Apr 15, 2021, 11:05 PM
Pedestrian's Avatar
Pedestrian Pedestrian is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 17,102
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtown,man View Post
Working out is key to avoiding Covid. No, going to the gym tomorrow isn't going to help you. But the data are clear: being overweight is a HUGE factor in getting a bad case of Covid.

To the earlier question about knowing people that don't want the vaccine. Almost everyone back in Arkansas that I know isn't. I don't think any of my family is to be honest. The doorman in the my building says he isn't getting it.

Compare this to kids in my classes at school. They are driving 4 hours south to get a vaccine.
Overweight makes the illness worse if you get it so in that sense it helps prevent SYMPTOMATIC COVID, but there's no data it prevents asymptomatic infection and it's asymptomatic infection that the rest of us need to be concerned with. If you are infected, whether symptomatic or not, you are a possible place for a mutation to occur and you can give it to someone who will have a tougher time with it.

Don't use being in what you think is good shape be an excuse not to get vaccinated as 10023 is doing.

Finally, if what you say about the prevalent attitude in Chicago is true, I'm just glad I don't live there. I want my Uber driver to be vaccinated. I want everyone I share the halls of my building to be vaccinated. If an employee of my building refused, I'd want management to require frequent tests of that person. And I would stay out of indoor spaces shared with friends and family who refuse and I would tell them why point blank.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #5430  
Old Posted Apr 15, 2021, 11:17 PM
chris08876's Avatar
chris08876 chris08876 is offline
ψ Sailor of the Mind ψ
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Riverview Estates Fairway (PA)
Posts: 36,773
Quote:
Originally Posted by the urban politician View Post
56 is old? Holy shit!

And I disagree that we should be targeting any age group for vaccination. All adults should be encouraged to get the shots. I’m not as irrationally freaked about variants as some others are, but we DO have to acknowledge that as long as the viral load is high in the public, the virus will gradually evolve into resistant strains. Keeping viral levels low within the population is the best way to dramatically slow that process down.
Old is in the mind. So long as the mind is sharp... one never ages. Skin... just the exoskeleton to the individual. Nothing but a conglomeration of cells and collagen. But the mind... the mind is the electrostatic web that defines the person. So long as the branches that radiate remain strong between the left and right hemispheres, one does not age. Bones may grow brittle and skin contracting like desecration cracks in the desert but the game of life is best explored via perception and neuroplasticity.



56 if anything, is intellectually is younger and fresher. More experiences, more long term memories stored. More overall plasticity of the natural world and past events.

Which is why neurodegenerative diseases are so tragic. Better to lose a leg than to degenerate into long-term memory inhibition that is irreversible.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #5431  
Old Posted Apr 15, 2021, 11:19 PM
chris08876's Avatar
chris08876 chris08876 is offline
ψ Sailor of the Mind ψ
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Riverview Estates Fairway (PA)
Posts: 36,773
Quote:
Originally Posted by jtown,man View Post
Working out is key to avoiding Covid. No, going to the gym tomorrow isn't going to help you. But the data are clear: being overweight is a HUGE factor in getting a bad case of Covid.

To the earlier question about knowing people that don't want the vaccine. Almost everyone back in Arkansas that I know isn't. I don't think any of my family is to be honest. The doorman in the my building says he isn't getting it.

Compare this to kids in my classes at school. They are driving 4 hours south to get a vaccine.
I had to drive 80 miles for mine. But I kind of woke up today for the 2nd shot happy. Part of history. A historical moment shared amongst millions of other. A sort of viral WW1 or WW2 moment of collective gratification that the war is almost over. The picture of the sailor kissing the lady in Times Square is best defined in 2021 as the fella getting the shot by a the sailor of our times, the nurses and doctors and scientists.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #5432  
Old Posted Apr 15, 2021, 11:25 PM
iheartthed iheartthed is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: New York
Posts: 4,852
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pedestrian View Post
Overweight makes the illness worse if you get it so in that sense it helps prevent SYMPTOMATIC COVID, but there's no data it prevents asymptomatic infection and it's asymptomatic infection that the rest of us need to be concerned with. If you are infected, whether symptomatic or not, you are a possible place for a mutation to occur and you can give it to someone who will have a tougher time with it.

Don't use being in what you think is good shape be an excuse not to get vaccinated as 10023 is doing.

Finally, if what you say about the prevalent attitude in Chicago is true, I'm just glad I don't live there. I want my Uber driver to be vaccinated. I want everyone I share the halls of my building to be vaccinated. If an employee of my building refused, I'd want management to require frequent tests of that person. And I would stay out of indoor spaces shared with friends and family who refuse and I would tell them why point blank.
Also, being overweight might make a person statistically more likely to have a severe case of COVID, but being healthy and in shape does not mean there is no risk of severe illness or death. Just like being overweight might make you statistically more likely to die in the event of a car accident, but that doesn't mean that car accidents don't pose a major risk to people who are in shape.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #5433  
Old Posted Apr 16, 2021, 12:04 AM
10023's Avatar
10023 10023 is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: London
Posts: 19,287
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pedestrian View Post
Overweight makes the illness worse if you get it so in that sense it helps prevent SYMPTOMATIC COVID, but there's no data it prevents asymptomatic infection and it's asymptomatic infection that the rest of us need to be concerned with. If you are infected, whether symptomatic or not, you are a possible place for a mutation to occur and you can give it to someone who will have a tougher time with it.

Don't use being in what you think is good shape be an excuse not to get vaccinated as 10023 is doing.

Finally, if what you say about the prevalent attitude in Chicago is true, I'm just glad I don't live there. I want my Uber driver to be vaccinated. I want everyone I share the halls of my building to be vaccinated. If an employee of my building refused, I'd want management to require frequent tests of that person. And I would stay out of indoor spaces shared with friends and family who refuse and I would tell them why point blank.
You and I would never come into contact in the “wild”. We wouldn’t go to any of the same places (you keep bringing up the example of grocery stores, but only because you won’t go during senior citizen hours).

If I’m going to have asymptomatic Covid but you are at risk of illness, should (a) both of us be confined to our homes with restaurants, bars, gyms and retail closed; or (b) you avoid such places while I go about my life in as normal a manner as possible?

The answer is clearly (b), and anyone who supports (a) is doing so out of either an unjustified degree of concern or spite (this is my father’s attitude - basically, “why should the young get to have fun if I can’t”). Either way, screw them.
__________________
There is a cult of ignorance in the United States, and there always has been. The strain of anti-intellectualism has been a constant thread winding its way through our political and cultural life, nurtured by the false notion that democracy means that "my ignorance is just as good as your knowledge." - Isaac Asimov
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #5434  
Old Posted Apr 16, 2021, 1:09 AM
SlidellWx's Avatar
SlidellWx SlidellWx is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: New Orleans
Posts: 1,441
Latest data by parish for Louisiana showing percent of the 18+ population vaccinated. New Orleans crossed the 50% line for those receiving at least one dose and having a fairly high degree of protection from infection. Current positive rate is 0.5% in the city. Getting pretty darn close to herd immunity in the city.

The three principle parishes of metro New Orleans (Orleans, Jefferson, St. Tammany) all have more than 1 out of 3 adults fully vaccinated.


courtesy @Crimealytics
__________________
Slidell, LA...The Camellia City
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #5435  
Old Posted Apr 16, 2021, 1:27 AM
someone123's Avatar
someone123 someone123 is offline
hähnchenbrüstfiletstüc
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Vancouver
Posts: 27,554
Quote:
Originally Posted by 10023 View Post
If I’m going to have asymptomatic Covid but you are at risk of illness, should (a) both of us be confined to our homes with restaurants, bars, gyms and retail closed; or (b) you avoid such places while I go about my life in as normal a manner as possible?
Haven't the older people in the US mostly gotten a chance to get vaccinated by now, or soon will have a chance and so this scenario is basically out of date? If they elected not to get vaccinated I don't know why they would feel entitled to demand that others be vaccinated or stay out of shared indoor spaces. If they did get vaccinated, they are not in fact at high risk anymore.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #5436  
Old Posted Apr 16, 2021, 2:20 AM
craigs's Avatar
craigs craigs is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: May 2019
Location: Volcanoes and Wolves
Posts: 2,335
Quote:
Originally Posted by 10023 View Post
If I’m going to have asymptomatic Covid . . .
. . . most people in such a scenario would feel they should wear a mask and maintain proper distance from others when in public, but basic brats will insist that everyone else must bear their light burden for them.
__________________
Politics is war without bloodshed. War is politics with bloodshed. The fascist Republican terrorists first launched their bloody war against America on January 6.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #5437  
Old Posted Apr 16, 2021, 2:46 AM
SIGSEGV's Avatar
SIGSEGV SIGSEGV is offline
He/his/him. >~<, QED!
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: Loop, Chicago
Posts: 3,960
Quote:
Originally Posted by homebucket View Post
Might be a dumb question but since you’re a physicist by trade, is it even theoretically possible to implant a chip into someone via a vehicle like a clear, colorless solution injected intramuscularly? I know things like valves and sensors can be implanted through major arteries and veins but you can actually see those with your naked eye.
It's possible to make nanochips so small that they probably can't readily be seen by the naked eye, but as far as I know they can't really do too much with current technology. See e.g. https://www.bbc.com/news/av/technology-54327412
__________________
And here the air that I breathe isn't dead.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #5438  
Old Posted Apr 16, 2021, 6:56 AM
Pedestrian's Avatar
Pedestrian Pedestrian is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 17,102
There has been some discussion of irrational mutant fears here. So today, from the CEO of Pfizer:

Quote:
Annual Covid-19 Vaccine Booster Shots Likely Needed, Pfizer CEO Says
By Jared S. Hopkins
Updated April 15, 2021 7:57 pm ET

Pfizer Inc. Chief Executive Albert Bourla said it is likely that people who receive Covid-19 vaccines will need booster shots within a year afterward, and then annual vaccinations, to maintain protection against the virus as it evolves.

“The variants will play a key role. It is extremely important to suppress the pool of people that can be susceptible to the virus,” Mr. Bourla said during a virtual event hosted by CVS Health Corp. that aired Thursday but was recorded April 1.

“There are vaccines like polio where one dose is enough,” Mr. Bourla said. “And there are vaccines like flu that you need every year. The Covid virus looks more like the influenza virus than the polio virus.”

More research is required to confirm the need for annual booster shots, he said. But he added that the need appeared likely given research so far.

. . . New shots or boosters might be necessary, vaccine experts say, if the virus mutates significantly enough . . . .

In February, Pfizer and BioNTech began a study testing in people whether a third dose of the companies’ inoculation can protect against emerging variant strains.

Moderna Inc. executives have also said they expect boosters to be needed to ensure protection lasts in vaccinated people. The company recently started studying whether a booster shot of its two-dose vaccine is effective against a variant of the virus.

Countries with high vaccination rates will be ready to shift their focus to boosters possibly at the end of this year, Moderna said during a company vaccine event this week. Moderna President Stephen Hoge said it is safe to assume boosters would be needed “annually, probably seasonally, even though the pandemic is raging in a nonseasonal way” . . . .
https://www.wsj.com/articles/annual-...d=hp_lead_pos7

As I've explained, I am perhaps a little more sanguine than these biotech CEOs in that I think if the current vaccines work as well as they seem to we could suppress infection rates, and hence viral mutation rates, enough to make the rise of new mutant strains a pretty rare event. But that would take most people in the developed world putting aside their vaccine hesitancy and it would take a massive campaign to get the developing world vaccinated. I don't think we'll be able to do that in one year but maybe in 3-5.
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #5439  
Old Posted Apr 16, 2021, 7:10 AM
Pedestrian's Avatar
Pedestrian Pedestrian is offline
Registered User
 
Join Date: Dec 2016
Location: San Francisco
Posts: 17,102
Quote:
Originally Posted by homebucket View Post
Might be a dumb question but since you’re a physicist by trade, is it even theoretically possible to implant a chip into someone via a vehicle like a clear, colorless solution injected intramuscularly? I know things like valves and sensors can be implanted through major arteries and veins but you can actually see those with your naked eye.
Amazing things are being done with nanoparticles, perhaps more with organic ones than with inorganic. For example:

Quote:
When atherosclerosis occurs in coronary arteries, blockages due to plaque or calcification-induced ruptures can lead to a clot, cutting blood flow to the heart, which is the cause of most heart attacks. When the condition occurs in the vessels leading to the brain, it can cause a stroke.

"An artery doesn't need to be 80 percent blocked to be dangerous. An artery with 45% blockage by plaques could be more rupture-prone," Chung said. "Just because it's a big plaque doesn't necessarily mean it's an unstable plaque."

Chung said that when small calcium deposits, called microcalcifications, form within arterial plaques, the plaque can become rupture prone.

However, identifying whether blood vessel calcification is unstable and likely to rupture is particularly difficult using traditional CT and MRI scanning methods, or angiography, which has other risks.

"Angiography requires the use of catheters that are invasive and have inherent risks of tissue damage," said Chin, the lead author. "CT scans on the other hand, involve ionizing radiation which can cause other detrimental effects to tissue."

Chung said that the resolution limitations of traditional imaging offers doctors a "bird's eye view" of larger-sized calcification, which may not necessarily be dangerous. "If the calcification is on the micro scale, it can be harder to pick out," she said.

The research team developed a nanoparticle, known as a micelle, which attaches itself and lights up calcification to make it easier for smaller blockages that are prone to rupture to be seen during imaging.

Chin said the micelles are able to specifically target hydroxyapatite, a unique form of calcium present in arteries and atherosclerotic plaques.
https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...1209161147.htm

or

Quote:
Michigan State University and Stanford University scientists have invented a nanoparticle that eats away -- from the inside out -- portions of plaques that cause heart attacks.

Bryan Smith, associate professor of biomedical engineering at MSU, and a team of scientists created a "Trojan Horse" nanoparticle that can be directed to eat debris, reducing and stabilizing plaque. The discovery could be a potential treatment for atherosclerosis, a leading cause of death in the United States.

The results, published in the current issue of Nature Nanotechnology, showcases the nanoparticle that homes in on atherosclerotic plaque due to its high selectivity to a particular immune cell type -- monocytes and macrophages. Once inside the macrophages in those plaques, it delivers a drug agent that stimulates the cell to engulf and eat cellular debris. Basically, it removes the diseased/dead cells in the plaque core. By reinvigorating the macrophages, plaque size is reduced and stabilized.

Smith said that future clinical trials on the nanoparticle are expected to reduce the risk of most types of heart attacks, with minimal side effects due to the unprecedented selectivity of the nanodrug.
https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0128114720.htm

There are actually quite a few experimental uses of nanoparticles in biomedicine now.

By definition, a nanoparticle is any particle less than 100 nanometers in size. I'm pretty sure no one could see that. It might make the fluid it's in appear cloudy if the concentration is high enough.

But I'm wondering why you ask. What use are you thinking of in relation to COVID?
Reply With Quote
     
     
  #5440  
Old Posted Apr 16, 2021, 7:47 AM
SIGSEGV's Avatar
SIGSEGV SIGSEGV is offline
He/his/him. >~<, QED!
 
Join Date: Jun 2018
Location: Loop, Chicago
Posts: 3,960
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pedestrian View Post
Amazing things are being done with nanoparticles, perhaps more with organic ones than with inorganic. For example:


https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...1209161147.htm

or


https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0128114720.htm

There are actually quite a few experimental uses of nanoparticles in biomedicine now.

By definition, a nanoparticle is any particle less than 100 nanometers in size. I'm pretty sure no one could see that. It might make the fluid it's in appear cloudy if the concentration is high enough.

But I'm wondering why you ask. What use are you thinking of in relation to COVID?
I imagine homebucket is wondering if anti-vaxxers irrational fear of a Bill Gates microchip is technically plausible at all.
__________________
And here the air that I breathe isn't dead.
Reply With Quote
     
     
This discussion thread continues

Use the page links to the lower-right to go to the next page for additional posts
 
 
Reply

Go Back   SkyscraperPage Forum > Discussion Forums > City Discussions
Forum Jump


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Forum Jump


All times are GMT. The time now is 1:53 PM.

     

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.