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Old Posted May 14, 2022, 7:12 PM
cabasse cabasse is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yuri View Post
I'm pretty sure this: https://www.google.com/maps/place/Bo...!4d-71.0588801 or this: https://www.google.com/maps/place/Bo...!4d-71.0588801 or this: https://www.google.com/maps/place/Bo...!4d-71.0588801 or this: https://www.google.com/maps/place/Bo...!4d-71.0588801 or this: https://www.google.com/maps/place/Bo...!4d-71.0588801 didn't exist three centuries ago.

Boston does have old towns that are now part of its urban area but it also has modern ultra-low sprawl. I don't understand this urge to make looking Boston perfect while bashing Atlanta over the same sins. Georgia is also an old state and I'm pretty sure Atlanta sprawls also has engulfed old villages, old farms as well.




All those old towns were already all built up by 17th century? They are linked together precisely by modern ultra-low density sprawl.

If Boston were located anywhere in the world aside the US east of Mississippi, its urbanized footprint would 1/3 of the current size.
absolutely - many of the suburbs within the sprawl of atlanta are historic small towns with their own downtowns - marietta, roswell, decatur, (which is older than atlanta) alpharetta, stone mountain, among many others. some of the nodes around boston are more substantial, like worcester but it's also an hour out. gainesville and athens are much bigger small cities both located in atl's CSA and not that much further out than worcester is from boston. would be interested to see the total number of ppl living in the denser census tracts around these old towns vs the total living in typical atl-type subdivisions. there doesn't seem to be much in-between.
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