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-   -   noirish Los Angeles (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showthread.php?t=170279)

FredH Dec 25, 2013 9:49 PM

Merry Christmas to all! Here is a card from 1908.

http://img834.imageshack.us/img834/7612/i6we.jpg
My collection

And a special thanks to ER for all your efforts these past few years.
(and the card even comes with a Merry Christmas E.R.)

CityBoyDoug Dec 25, 2013 11:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JeffDiego (Post 6385281)
RE: The 1920's photos of crowds at an amusement park...
This comment and "personal observation" is from someone who is certainly not as "svelte" as when I was younger, and who has family members battling overweight. I always notice in these old photos of groups of people that generally NOT ONE PERSON could be called obese. Virtually everyone is slim, especially anyone who appears to be younger than 40. The occasional person who is mildly "husky" or "portly" is usually middle-aged or older. What an amazing contrast to all of the hefty and even enormous people in any typical group or crowd scene today.

The reason may be that food was not as processed then as it is now. Plus, the ubiquitous use of High Fructose Corn syrup in 2013 is very dangerous one's health because is it already partially digested. Beet or cane sugar is costly to use in a product....HFCS is very low cost, a couple cents per item. The photo below is 7th street and Olive, LA, 1937...not many people in the photo but they look thin.


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v4...ps7d98538a.jpg
LAPLcollection

Graybeard Dec 26, 2013 12:05 AM

Ironic, considering the full figure was more desirable.

OutlawImages Dec 26, 2013 1:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by OutlawImages (Post 6383904)
Hello all I am in need of help enlarging and sharpening a photo. I was not sure if it was acceptable to post for this assistance but ethereal_reality says you members here would be supportive and most likely could help me

It is not a LA related image but is a older image from the 1940s that I am trying to read the street signs to verify a location for a research project.

I as a photographer have used Photoshop but not in this area and just dont seem to know which adjustments to use to enlarge and not pix-elate it

And I see you guys here enlarge some amazing images to huge proportions and make things legible

If you might be willing to help please PM me and I can get an address to email image?

Thanks in advance to any help and thanks to the members for patience and understanding with my post

Brian

Earl contacted me and was willing to generously help me. He helped out and narrowed things down to allow me to finally figure it out

A big THANKS to Earl and the members for allowing me to post my request here

Brian

GatoVerde Dec 26, 2013 5:15 AM

View from Fort Moore this evening. Happy Holidays!
http://i982.photobucket.com/albums/a...ps6625e9e1.jpg

GaylordWilshire Dec 26, 2013 4:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Those Who Squirm (Post 6384811)
I couldn't figure this out until I saw this L.A. Times article, nor did I know she was a designer. It doesn't look like a retail store. But now having seen the article, it's easy to make out the tops and bottoms of women's swimsuits behind the frosted glass.


This building is 10341 Venice Boulevard, on the NE corner of Motor Avenue and Venice.

http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3806/1...d0cbe4c6_z.jpg
(Snip from GSV)

Both it and the building with the three little shops directly east of it are still there, although the latter has apparently been annexed to the surplus store and the individual store entrances walled off. It's been a surplus store as far back as I can remember; I think we once came here for some camping supplies sometime around 1970.


According to this article on the Expo Construction Authority's website,



I don't want to quote too much directly, but it goes on to describer a number of interesting architectural details which you can read in the link. It also seems curious that the ECA is writing about something relatively far from the route, but I unfortunately doubt that it's because they're thinking of putting the Venice Short Line back in.

You can still see the polished granite paving with the bank's name just outside the entrance. There was some good reason I wasn't able to compose the shot better or get a decent vantage point, but I don't remember what that was.

http://farm3.staticflickr.com/2890/1...12182e69_z.jpg
(Own work)

The other former post office on Motor was apparently built in 1950, according to county property records, so it seems safe to assume this was probably the post office until just before then.

ETA: 20:57 I see now where you have already mentioned the bank, but now we have a picture of the paving as well.


https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-q...2520PM.bmp.jpgLAPL


A little more:

Quote:

Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire (Post 5875543)
:previous:

According to the LAPL, it was once a branch of the Security-First National Bank and later became the Palms Station of the US Post Office.

[IMf

According to this, it was built by a predecessor of Security-First:

https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-e...2520PM.bmp.jpg


PS There is more info on the origins of Citizens State if you google Clarence E. Coe and the history of Sawtelle.


Retired_in_Texas Dec 26, 2013 4:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CityBoyDoug (Post 6385323)
The reason may be that food was not as processed then as it is now. Plus, the ubiquitous use of High Fructose Corn syrup in 2013 is very dangerous one's health because is it already partially digested. Beet or cane sugar is costly to use in a product....HFCS is very low cost, a couple cents per item. The photo below is 7th street and Olive, LA, 1937...not many people in the photo but they look thin.


http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v4...ps7d98538a.jpg
LAPLcollection

One cannot discount the simple fact that in the 1930s, '40s, and '50s the nature of everyday living dictated a much more physically active lifestyle. Most mowed lawns with a simple reel type push mower, no dish washers, no TV sets to sit in front of hours on end, and folks were not compelled to mindlessly circle the block dozens of times looking for a parking spot right in front of a given businesses door, they actually parked and walked a few blocks if necessary. Eating in some sort of restaurant was not something most people did more than once a week if even that often, and at that time even restaurant food was nutritious and healthy.

PHX31 Dec 26, 2013 4:44 PM

I apologize for this post, but I'm looking for some of the old photos in this thread that show the oil fields, especially those photos that have been posted that show vast amounts of oil derricks. Long Beach comes to mind as one location that had several oil field pictures posted. I did a search of this thread but came up empty.

I was given a nice present on Christmas by my Uncle... my Great Grandfather's 50' steel measuring tape - my Uncle told me it was used by my Great Grandfather who worked all over Southern California in the oil fields as a driller from the 20s to the 50s. He specifically told me he worked in Long Beach and Signal Hill. I wanted to show my Uncle some of the pictures from this thread of those areas, but I can't find them.

Thanks in advance for any assistance.

FredH Dec 26, 2013 5:31 PM

:previous:

PHX31 - I think the quickest way to find what you are looking for is to Google "Los Angeles oilfields", then click on images at the top of the page. There are
a bunch.

ER - I found this photo from 1939 of the Brunswig Drug Company building in Little Tokyo. Looked pretty nice back then.

http://imageshack.us/a/img31/781/4lxg.JPG
USC

Andys Dec 26, 2013 5:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Retired_in_Texas (Post 6385579)
One cannot discount the simple fact that in the 1930s, '40s, and '50s the nature of everyday living dictated a much more physically active lifestyle. Most mowed lawns with a simple reel type push mower, no dish washers, no TV sets to sit in front of hours on end, and folks were not compelled to mindlessly circle the block dozens of times looking for a parking spot right in front of a given businesses door, they actually parked and walked a few blocks if necessary. Eating in some sort of restaurant was not something most people did more than once a week if even that often, and at that time even restaurant food was nutritious and healthy.

Or sitting for hours in front of the computer screen logged on to SkyscraperPage Forum..........Sorry, couldn't resist!

As kids, my mother, brother, and I, would walk three blocks to pick up the bus in Atwater Village (known simply as Atwater in those years) and go to downtown LA for a day of shopping. Walking, of course, to all the stores within a pretty significant radius. May Co. was the traditional first stop. We were usually treated to lunch at Clifton's, or another cafeteria, which name I can't remember. So yes, I agree. Much more exercise was the norm in those years.

Living in Atwater, we never drove those two or three blocks to "the boulevard" for necessities. Also, as kids, we would walk to the theaters on Brand Blvd. in Glendale, never thinking of spending our popcorn money on riding the bus; a two or three mile walk, if I recall correctly. 15 cents was the cost to watch a double feature at The Temple Theater.

Andys

OutlawImages Dec 26, 2013 5:59 PM

Great Photo, looks to be in Houston,Tx in 1938

Actor Tom Mix in front of his 1937 Cord Phaeton
610 Capitol Avenue Houston Texas

Shop long gone at this point

Graybeard Dec 26, 2013 6:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by OutlawImages (Post 6385655)
Great Photo, looks to be in Houston,Tx in 1938

Actor Tom Mix in front of his 1937 Cord Phaeton
610 Capitol Avenue Houston Texas

Shop long gone at this point

Yes, long gone, but a dizzying perspective from GSV of the new building at that location.
http://img11.imageshack.us/img11/7377/8j8a.jpg

GatoVerde Dec 26, 2013 8:53 PM

Brewery and Aliso
 
Brew102 from the 101 North, circa 1983, my photo:


http://i982.photobucket.com/albums/a...ps70940440.jpg
View West:

http://i982.photobucket.com/albums/a...psb3c46661.jpg

The brewery still looked intact and functional, although I don't know if it was. I remember some time later one building stood alone, the oblong one with the "Brew102" sign on it. That building, just East of North Garey Street, stood immediately West of the Aliso. The Aliso site is currently the entrance to the 101 South.

GatoVerde Dec 26, 2013 9:01 PM

Mystery photo, L.A. circa 1983
 
I shot this circa 1983 somewhere near downtown L.A., but I don't remember where. I thought someone here could help me out:

http://i982.photobucket.com/albums/a...ps233267fb.jpg

OutlawImages Dec 26, 2013 9:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 6105121)
:previous: Interesting buildings lemster2024. I like that 'ghost' sign.
__


(below) The sign on the wheel reads...

B & M Wheel Sirens
931 S. Main St.
L.A.

I like her gloves.
http://imageshack.us/a/img16/1977/aa...lsirens931.jpg
http://justacarguy.blogspot.com/
__

B & M Sirens is still in business and selling old school sirens!
http://www.siro-driftsirens.com/products.html

This motorcycle has one of their old round sirens in the "Y" section of the frame in front of rear wheel

This must have been promotional photo?

Here is a video and sound of the old school B&M 1940s style sirens we are used to in the old Noir movies
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FewoPm71V6U

GaylordWilshire Dec 26, 2013 10:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by OutlawImages (Post 6385655)
Great Photo, looks to be in Houston,Tx in 1938

Actor Tom Mix in front of his 1937 Cord Phaeton
610 Capitol Avenue Houston Texas

Shop long gone at this point


Meanwhile, back in Los Angeles...Tom with a Leach:

http://theoldmotor.com/wp-content/up...ch-600x472.jpg

http://theoldmotor.com/?tag=tom-mix

CityBoyDoug Dec 26, 2013 10:32 PM

Eatin' healthy....
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Retired_in_Texas (Post 6385579)
One cannot discount the simple fact that in the 1930s, '40s, and '50s the nature of everyday living dictated a much more physically active lifestyle. Most mowed lawns with a simple reel type push mower, no dish washers, no TV sets to sit in front of hours on end, and folks were not compelled to mindlessly circle the block dozens of times looking for a parking spot right in front of a given businesses door, they actually parked and walked a few blocks if necessary. Eating in some sort of restaurant was not something most people did more than once a week if even that often, and at that time even restaurant food was nutritious and healthy.

You are very correct Retired. People don't have the physical activity that most had in the 1930's. Add that fact to the proliferation of unhealthy food and you've set the stage for disaster.:(

Mr.Swink Dec 27, 2013 1:21 AM

Los Angeles downtown tunnels.
 
Possibly someone has already posted this but here is a link to an article about tunnels in downtown from KCET. It's got a picture or two I had never seem before.

http://www.kcet.org/updaily/socal_fo...la.html?utm=fb

Happy Holidays

edfphoto Dec 27, 2013 2:47 AM

.

ProphetM Dec 27, 2013 5:10 AM

This is not a blog; it's a discussion forum.


Speaking of discussion, are 1980s photos too new? I grew up in SoCal but it was in Orange County and my parents came from Iowa in the early 1970s. Consequently I have no personal photos of 'old' LA, and very few newer pics as we rarely ventured into LA. But I did dig up this crappy photo from 1984:

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-9...ug84N11008.jpg
me

The high rise down the street appears to be still under construction.

As it turns out this is the intersection of Alpine and Broadway, which looks pretty much the same in Google Street View's 2011 drive-by:

https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-l...533%2520PM.jpg
GSV


I also have the photo below, which is from the same roll of film. I think it's Forest Lawn in Glendale.

https://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-8...ug84N11007.jpg
me


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