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westcork Sep 22, 2012 9:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BifRayRock (Post 5840992)
Upon reexamination of the original photo, it is not exactly clear that the subject building is a perfect square or rectangular.

It could be due to the angle or the the lens used, but . . . one "wing" of the building (bearing the placard) may be sitting a few feet forward of the other. However, unless one of the images were reversed, this seems opposite of what is depicted in your later found image. The earlier '48 image is blurry enough to chalk up to time of day conditions (or maybe the fact that pilot was distracted - by saucer shaped objects looking to land next to the mother ship (Simons @ Wilshire and Fairfax). :rolleyes: Parenthetically, I wonder if the original building was on a hill or slightly elevated when compared to whatever is to the viewer's left of the building? (Could be time to look toward Maywood.)


http://img585.imageshack.us/img585/1...iedbuildin.jpg

Does anybody have the link to the original LAPL page?

Chuckaluck Sep 22, 2012 10:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by westcork (Post 5841031)
Does anybody have the link to the original LAPL page?

Sure!

Unfortunately, the link originally provided self-expires. If you are serious, search LAPL for "Schultheis 4032" and you will likely find it. Otherwise, below are the bulk of the notes culled from that page.

Good hunting!



Quote:

Filing Information Herman J. Schultheis Collection
N-004-955 8x10
Date [ca. 1937]

Description 1 photographic print : b&w ; 11 x 15 cm.
Notes Herman J. Schultheis was born in Aachen, Germany in 1900, and immigrated to the United States in the min-1920s after obtaining a Ph.D. in mechanical and electrical engineering. He married Ethel Wisloh in 1936, and the pair moved to Los Angeles the following year. He worked in the film industry from the late 1930s to the mid-1940s, most notably on the animated features "Fantasia" and "Pinocchio." His detailed notebook, documenting the special effects for "Fantasia," is the subject of a 14-minute short-subject included on the film's DVD. In 1949, he started employment with Librascope as a patent engineer. Schultheis was an avid amateur photographer who traveled the world with his cameras. It was on one of these photographic exhibitions in 1955 that he disappeared in the jungles of Guatemala. His remains were discovered 18 months later. The digitized portion of this collection represents the images Schultheis took of Los Angeles and its surrounding communities after he relocated to the area in 1937.
LAPL 00019101
Summary Two cars are parked outside an Art Deco style medical building, located at 4032 on an unidentified street in Los Angeles.


GaylordWilshire Sep 22, 2012 10:35 PM

I suppose this house

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-l...dorlaplred.jpg


could be this one:

https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-y...uildinXred.jpg

Both pics LAPL

ethereal_reality Sep 22, 2012 10:54 PM

...good eye GW. I overlooked the reflection.

Chuckaluck Sep 23, 2012 12:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rcarlton (Post 5744747)
Exterior of the Wilshire Theatre, designed by S. Charles Lee and built between 1928-1930. This classic Art Deco structure, located at 8440 Wilshire, originally operated under the Fox theater chain and includes a 2,500 seat auditorium, a tower with residential and office space (no longer used), and commercial space on the ground floor.
http://jpg3.lapl.org/pics18/00028683.jpgLAPL
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...Theater_05.jpg
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...Theater_04.jpg
Wikipedia
http://photos.cinematreasures.org/pr...JPG?1314660054Saban Theater
http://farm6.staticflickr.com/5323/7...0a3a0b1a_b.jpgGoogle Earth

____________________

The only thing missing from MCarlson's excellent post is a beginning - and maybe another Collie. Here is what once started out as the Fox Wilshire Theater. (1928-30)
http://content.cdlib.org/ark:/13030/kt4d5nc5w9/hi-res

http://content.cdlib.org/ark:/13030/kt029016qp/hi-res

http://content.cdlib.org/ark:/13030/kt296nc3dt/hi-res

http://content.cdlib.org/ark:/13030/kt4n39q2bk/hi-res

http://content.cdlib.org/ark:/13030/kt400018fn/hi-res

http://content.cdlib.org/ark:/13030/kt8h4nc8wn/hi-res
All from UCLA Digital

Note to "300": most skyscrapers were uncommon in LA until the '60s. This thread may cover all building, it's focus is on an aspect different than purely tall buildings. Hence, not much may be "readily" available, unless you are looking for "skyscrapers" of less than 32 Floors (the height of LA's current City Hall.):shrug:

Tourmaline Sep 23, 2012 1:02 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 4776702)
Tally's New Broadway Theater at 6th ST. & Broadway.
http://img401.imageshack.us/img401/4...heaterat6t.jpg
usc digital archive

Can you imagine what this looked like at night with the exceptional electric signs (especially in 1905).

_________________


:)
http://cinemat.org/images/tally_selectricanim.gifhttp://www.google.com

ethereal_reality Sep 23, 2012 1:04 AM

:previous: Very cooool....fantastic job Tourmaline!
__


I am looking for a little help here.

I found this photo on a very old cd of mine.
The only information I have is..."Model in downtown Los Angeles lobby before destruction"

http://imageshack.us/a/img831/1664/a...yatrium195.jpg
unknown

Anyone have an idea what lobby this might be?
__

ethereal_reality Sep 23, 2012 1:46 AM

A rather humorous postcard of two tourists riding atop a Boeing-Stratocruiser. For some reason they are commenting on Los Angeles freeways.

http://imageshack.us/a/img29/3091/aakitschpc.jpg
ebay





A Pan American Airlines Stratocruiser maneuvering over the newly constructed Sepulveda Tunnel at LAX in 1953.
(I believe this is Pan American's clipper ship 'Southern Cross')

http://imageshack.us/a/img171/6079/l...unnelhuge1.jpg
http://www.flightpath.us/

above: Also of note is the Lockheed Constellation (preferred by TWA) to the left of the Stratocruiser.

__

Los Angeles Past Sep 23, 2012 2:26 AM

I have re-opened my L.A. history blog.

http://losangelespast.blogspot.com

Most of the images have been updated and increased in size, to better accommodate today's higher monitor resolutions and download speeds. Several posts have entirely new images, too - ones that I think tell the story better than those that were there previously.

There are already 6 new articles. My most recent post shows Hollywood as you have probably never seen it before!

-Scott

Those Who Squirm! Sep 23, 2012 3:33 AM

A piece of forgotten L.A.
 
Lost L.A.--we talk about it a lot here. Historic houses and buildings, in fact whole neighborhoods, have fallen to wrecking balls and bulldozers, and sometimes whole streets are made to vanish to such an extent that we can't even remember where certain landmarks used to be.

Then there's Forgotten L.A., which we also discuss frequently. This comprises historic areas and buildings which, fortunately, were forgotten when the city fathers, in the post-World-War-II era, were deciding on which areas to impose their bland suburbanophile aesthetic. A day or two ago I was taking a virtual walk, courtesy of Google Earth, in the 1600 and 1700 blocks of North Spring--just west of the river. I don't normally like to use screen captures in my posts, and I fully intend to go there in person and get better pictures. But I think this is just too good to hold back. This picture is looking "north", as the street numbers go, but really more towards the east, facing the river.

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8319/8...3ee23479_b.jpg

The buildings seen here are interesting in their own right. The one on the left occupies the gore-shaped lot where Baker and North Spring meet, and goes back to 1890 according to public records; the one on the right, now occupied by an art studio, goes back to 1925 according to the same records. I'm surprised it isn't a lot older.

But check out those vintage street lamps! I don't mean the taller ones that have an armature extending over the street with a clearly visible globe, because I think those are new. I've seen them on Santa Monica Boulevard near the 405, and those were put there in the last decade or so. Rather, I'm referring to the smaller ones of which you can see two on the left. I didn't think there were any such lampposts left, and these must be among the oldest in the city.

Oddly enough, it seems that on all of the few occasions I've ever been in this neighborhood, it was gloomy and overcast every time.

Those Who Squirm! Sep 23, 2012 3:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Los Angeles Past (Post 5841237)
I have re-opened my L.A. history blog.

http://losangelespast.blogspot.com

Most of the images have been updated and increased in size, to better accommodate today's higher monitor resolutions and download speeds. Several posts have entirely new images, too - ones that I think tell the story better than those that were there previously.

There are already 6 new articles. My most recent post shows Hollywood as you have probably never seen it before!

-Scott

Dammit, Scott! How do you expect a man to get any work done?

GaylordWilshire Sep 23, 2012 4:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Those Who Squirm (Post 5841283)
Lost L.A.--we talk about it a lot here. Historic houses and buildings, in fact whole neighborhoods, have fallen to wrecking balls and bulldozers, and sometimes whole streets are made to vanish to such an extent that we can't even remember where certain landmarks used to be.

Then there's Forgotten L.A., which we also discuss frequently. This comprises historic areas and buildings which, fortunately, were forgotten when the city fathers, in the post-World-War-II era, were deciding on which areas to impose their bland suburbanophile aesthetic. A day or two ago I was taking a virtual walk, courtesy of Google Earth, in the 1600 and 1700 blocks of North Spring--just west of the river. I don't normally like to use screen captures in my posts, and I fully intend to go there in person and get better pictures. But I think this is just too good to hold back. This picture is looking "north", as the street numbers go, but really more towards the east, facing the river.

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8319/8...3ee23479_b.jpg

The buildings seen here are interesting in their own right. The one on the left occupies the gore-shaped lot where Baker and North Spring meet, and goes back to 1890 according to public records; the one on the right, now occupied by an art studio, goes back to 1925 according to the same records. I'm surprised it isn't a lot older.

But check out those vintage street lamps! I don't mean the taller ones that have an armature extending over the street with a clearly visible globe, because I think those are new. I've seen them on Santa Monica Boulevard near the 405, and those were put there in the last decade or so. Rather, I'm referring to the smaller ones of which you can see two on the left. I didn't think there were any such lampposts left, and these must be among the oldest in the city.

Oddly enough, it seems that on all of the few occasions I've ever been in this neighborhood, it was gloomy and overcast every time.


http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...postcount=7546

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...postcount=7575

Those Who Squirm! Sep 23, 2012 5:56 AM

You certainly got better screen captures than I did!

BTW how do you get all that information about past tenants and owners?

ethereal_reality Sep 23, 2012 6:48 AM

Those Who Squirm, I like your enthusiasm!

I felt the same way when I first came across this interesting area on North Spring Street.
The thread is so large, repetition is unavoidable.

Keep exploring

Los Angeles Past Sep 23, 2012 10:04 AM

Cahuenga time travel
 
The same spot, on the same road, in three centuries.

Los Angeles Past Sep 23, 2012 12:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Those Who Squirm (Post 5841285)
Dammit, Scott! How do you expect a man to get any work done?


LOL! I totally sympathize. Actually, though, after I get done with my posting backlog, I expect I'll revert back to my old pattern of only updating my blog occasionally. It won't be worth checking every day by any means; maybe once a month, tops.

GaylordWilshire Sep 23, 2012 1:36 PM

[Re the 1600 block of N. Spring]

Quote:

Originally Posted by Those Who Squirm (Post 5841367)

BTW how do you get all that information about past tenants and owners?


The usual places-- L.A. city directories from the LAPL and other sources, insurance maps, & just googling.


Here's another post about 1646 N Spring

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...postcount=7577

You'll see in this one the plaque on the facade, the date of which agrees with the records you found. I'm not sure if we ever figured out what exactly "House of 1646 N. Spring" means. Maybe there is no particular meaning--

rick m Sep 23, 2012 3:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 5841190)
:previous: Very cooool....fantastic job Tourmaline!
__


I am looking for a little help here.

I found this photo on a very old cd of mine.
The only information I have is..."Model in downtown Los Angeles lobby before destruction"

http://imageshack.us/a/img831/1664/a...yatrium195.jpg
unknown

Anyone have an idea what lobby this might be?
__

My guess is the Biltmore Theatre - not the vanished Metropolitan-Graumans-Paramount as that was a baroque interior--- Leonard of Caravan Books spoke recently of observing some of that demolition process... at 6th n Hill

Fab Fifties Fan Sep 23, 2012 5:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 5841190)
:previous: Very cooool....fantastic job Tourmaline!
__


I am looking for a little help here.

I found this photo on a very old cd of mine.
The only information I have is..."Model in downtown Los Angeles lobby before destruction"

http://imageshack.us/a/img831/1664/a...yatrium195.jpg
unknown

Anyone have an idea what lobby this might be?
__

That is actually the lobby of the Mason Theater that once proudly stood at 127 S. Broadway.

Opened in 1903 as the Mason Opera House, it was demolioshed in 1956 to make room for the State of California office building, which has since been demolished as well. It is currently a dirt lot surrounded by a chain link fence.

1950 Exterior Shot
http://imageshack.us/a/img43/4320/masontheater3.jpg
www.library.ca.gov

The lobby looking in from the entrance. (The staircase that the model is standing on in E_R's image is top right.)
http://imageshack.us/a/img338/7845/masontheater1.jpg
LAPL

The model's view toward the front entrance.
http://imageshack.us/a/img832/5739/masontheater2.jpg
LAPL

Many thanks to our friends over at Historic Los Angeles Theaters (https://sites.google.com/site/downto...ngelestheatres)
ALWAYS an awesome reference site!

~Jon Paul

ethereal_reality Sep 23, 2012 5:47 PM

:previous: Wow! I had no idea. Thanks Jon Paul. :)

I like the 'vignettes' of the movie stars*.....but I wouldn't want to be standing under that giant urn during an earthquake.



http://imageshack.us/a/img15/5715/aamodelmason.jpg

Another thing that confused me about the original photograph was the model. I would never have guessed she was from 1956 (the year the theater was destroyed). I would have guessed a date closer to that late 1970s or early 80s. She sees quite contemporary actually.
__


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