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Otis Criblecoblis May 14, 2015 4:38 AM

Verdugo Lodge
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 7026044)
:previous: I just took the google-mobile over to see the arch.

I almost missed it altogether, it's partially hidden by shrubs at the end of dead end road (New York Avenue)
It made me appreciate it all the more. The location makes it all the more mysterious.

can u spot it? ;)
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/102...909/2b6l4N.jpg
GSV

Did you have trouble finding it t2? I don't think we would have ever found it without Otis's directions. -So thanks Otis!

You're welcome! I'm very happy that I could be of help. Since this area seems to be of interest, I thought I'd try to go a bit beyond the Google-mobile, and give a little perspective and history on the gate and the surrounding area.

I was in this area a great deal in roughly the 1965-1975 period, when the area was both less developed and more well-groomed. The basic configuration, now obscured by overgrowth and Google-mobile distortion, was that New York terminated in a fairly wide traffic circle with a big tree in the middle. Off this circle was a dirt road through the gate, and another along the wash that led directly to the street I lived on. The area was very rural back then (the wash was unlined until about 1970), but neatly kept. At that time, it was considered criminal neglect to allow the kind of overgrowth seen in the Google pictures. The memory of the devastating fire of mid-1964 was still fresh in the community's mind.

I had a few friends who lived within about 100 yards of the circle, and they told me that past the gate the road was private, there were a few homes up it, and they were very hostile to visitors. Sadly, I never verified this for myself.

Crescenta Valley old-timers say that there used to be a nightclub/speakeasy up there during Prohibition days, and that the club continued on for some time after repeal. Coincidentally, a link provided a few pages back by tovangar2, here, provides documentation of this. On page 9 of that pdf, there is an ad for the "Verdugo Lodge" that says, "Entrance south end New York Avenue." It's a fairly safe assumption that whoever built the nightclub built the gate.

I lived over in Whiting Woods, which was itself the site of a speakeasy masquerading, if I recall correctly, as some sort of sporting club.

tovangar2 May 14, 2015 4:57 AM

:previous: Thx again Otis Criblecoblis:
https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-O...11248%2BPM.jpg
cvhistory


-------------------------------------------


Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 7026381)
I thought I'd check out the address of the Deutsches Haus in the google-mobile...
...and here's an undated view of the exterior.

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/128...909/Vd7pE1.jpg
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/128...633/OOhOXt.jpg
http://digital-library.csun.edu/cdm/...ackyard/id/106

:previous: There wasn't much information to go along with the photograph, so I'm not sure who's doing the picketing.

The Bund and the then-German government had plenty of opponents, not least of which were German Americans alarmed at what was going on back in Germany.
Also, of course, leftists and Jewish groups. None of these people could get the US government to recognize the dangers, until Pearl Harbor, but the Bund then disbanded.
And the LAPD Red Squad kept right on breaking the heads of their usual targets. The Bund didn't present as dreaded "agitators" or troublemakers. They came across,
to the many unaware, as orderly, organized and American (I read one had to be an American citizen to be a member).

The GAB tagline:
https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-y...94510%2BPM.jpg
csun dl

That is the oddest photo of the interior of Deutches Haus. Joint's not exactly jumping, is it? Looks glum.

Tourmaline May 14, 2015 5:51 AM

Around Market and North Main Streets? (http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...postcount=8886)



1884-1892 Wells Fargo (Exact location unk.)
http://econtent.unm.edu/utils/ajaxhe...XT=&DMROTATE=0http://econtent.unm.edu/utils/ajaxhe...XT=&DMROTATE=0
http://econtent.unm.edu/utils/ajaxhe...XT=&DMROTATE=0http://econtent.unm.edu/utils/ajaxhe...XT=&DMROTATE=0http://econtent.unm.edu/cdm/singleit.../10483/rec/107



Wells Fargo (Market and N. Main)
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/utils/...rgo&DMROTATE=0http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/utils/...rgo&DMROTATE=0
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/utils/...rgo&DMROTATE=0http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/utils/...rgo&DMROTATE=0http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/si...id/20634/rec/6

Tourmaline May 14, 2015 6:04 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fhammon (Post 5761787)
I love this photo!
It really captures the "cheese" of the era and the kid on the bicycle displaying his pubescent curiosity just dieing to know what's going on inside. (You're not missing much kid)

There was a whole genre of films and themes spawned by an idea that goes back who knows how far.

Here's an early depiction from some WWI propaganda:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...version%29.jpg

The film Ingagi "a 1930 Pre-Code exploitation film" really got the ball rolling.
(Can anybody find a copy? "Son of Inagi - 1940" is ubiquitous) I would almost bet that Ingagi is what's being shown at the joint in the photo, "Post-Code".
It might have been the "Deep Throat" of it's day.

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi.../7a/Ingagi.jpg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Ingagi.jpg

Then came King Kong in 1933:

http://theinvisibleagent.files.wordp...ters.jpg?w=460http://theinvisibleagent.wordpress.com/2008/11/




Kong lives


1999 - LA
http://econtent.unm.edu/utils/ajaxhe...XT=&DMROTATE=0http://econtent.unm.edu/utils/ajaxhe...XT=&DMROTATE=0
http://econtent.unm.edu/utils/ajaxhe...XT=&DMROTATE=0http://econtent.unm.edu/utils/ajaxhe...XT=&DMROTATE=0http://econtent.unm.edu/cdm/singleit.../14082/rec/222



1998 - Shoe store located on Sunset Boulevard in Echo Park.
http://jpg3.lapl.org/pics36/00067975.jpghttp://jpg3.lapl.org/pics36/00067975.jpg

Martin Pal May 14, 2015 7:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tourmaline (Post 7026818)
Tropicana Motel - Card bears '51 postmark (Sorry if this is a repost)

I don't believe these have been seen before. I don't
recall them anyway, thanks!

Notice this card says "...with view of City and Ocean." :shrug:

That's pretty optimistic!

ethereal_reality May 14, 2015 4:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Otis Criblecoblis (Post 7026855)
Crescenta Valley old-timers say that there used to be a nightclub/speakeasy up there during Prohibition days,
and that the club continued on for some time after repeal. It's a fairly safe assumption that whoever built the nightclub built the gate.

originally posted by t2
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640...633/IGtnZG.jpg

I haven't been able to located a photograph of the lodge itself, but I found one vintage photo of the grounds with it's stone walls.

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/102...912/3d6sIC.jpg
http://www.crescentavalleyweekly.com...mountain-oaks/


today, there are still some remnants
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/800...901/Eynq0V.jpg
http://www.avoidingregret.com/2014/0...ks-resort.html


I especially like these two fireplaces.

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/800...673/4GjC5g.jpg
http://www.avoidingregret.com/2014/0...ks-resort.html

I've been searching for the 'ruins' from google_earth, but I haven't had much luck yet.

red circle=stone arch
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/640...911/ONiBUy.jpg
______


Further reading, with many more photographs:

A Peek Into Secluded Mountain Oaks
http://www.crescentavalleyweekly.com...mountain-oaks/


Mountain Oaks Resort, Abandoned and Illegally Subdivided (illegally subdivided, as in 400 10x10 lots)
http://www.avoidingregret.com/2014/0...ks-resort.html

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/320...908/2NxTpm.jpg

illegally subdivided, as in 400 10x10 lots!
__

ethereal_reality May 14, 2015 5:14 PM

I don't believe we've seen this unique building on NLA yet.

It's located in Venice at Speedway and Thornton Avenue.

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/102...661/XGPhym.jpg
https://www.flickr.com/photos/383105...n/photostream/


I like this distant view of it. (I believe we're looking down Speedway)

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/102...913/5dDX3C.jpg
https://www.flickr.com/photos/383105...n/photostream/





The google-mobile didn't go down Thornton Avenue, but here's a view of the unique entrance from Speedway. (I can't make out what it says on the plaque)

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/102...537/TRzUry.jpg
GSV


'doglord' took this photo from Thornton Avenue, showing a second entrance that's below-grade.

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/102...909/zjZCk5.jpg
http://dogtownink.com/21/thornton-towers-historic/

Several sources say it's called Thornton Tower
and 'doglord' says there's a Isadora Duncan connection! here:http://dogtownink.com/21/thornton-towers-historic/

Here's a GSV look.
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/128...673/PkYpwo.jpg
GSV



even the back is graceful.
http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/102...908/q9asJo.jpg
GSV

I've been trying to find a vintage photograph of it, and some further information.
Surely it shows up in some old aerials. (but I haven't spotted it yet)

-are there Sanborn maps available for the Venice area?
__

HossC May 14, 2015 5:35 PM

:previous:

I found a PDF file at freevenice.org that calls it Thornton Towers (Isadora Duncan Bldg.), and says it was built in 1913. I have a look for vintage aerial shots.

ethereal_reality May 14, 2015 6:24 PM

:previous: That's a good start Hoss. thanks!

Over the years we've seen, now and again, the numerous (and often hard to find) public stairways that are scattered throughout the hills.

So I find it hard to believe that we haven't seen this particular stairway, with it's impressive 'balcony-like' platform.

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/800...537/wTJFr4.jpg

Don Barrett at http://www.ipernity.com/home/donbrr

Does anyone know where this is location? The photographer didn't disclose the location.

__

ethereal_reality May 14, 2015 6:40 PM

Another, more precarious, set of stairs in Griffith Park.

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/102...901/3tDHBU.jpg
http://www.ipernity.com/doc/donbrr/2...n/album/467687

Don Barrett wrote:
"These ladder/stairs go from the trail up to the base of an electrical tower of LADWP.
I was surprised to see them readily accessible with no signs to stay off. A rough guess
would be that they were built in the 1940."



Here's a second look....straight up.

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/102...910/Jv59G2.jpg
http://www.ipernity.com/doc/donbrr/2...n/album/467687

that's just waiting for a lawsuit.

__

Andys May 14, 2015 8:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Krell58 (Post 7026631)
I liked 'em because my dad liked 'em. I didn't join in on the sardine or potted meat sandwiches though.



CBD, we didn't spread it, we just left it in slices, about 1/3 the size of these.

I left mine in slices as well, but preferred it with aged Swiss cheese and mayo. My parents were eastern European, so yes, I'm familiar with many of those delights.

Andy

GaylordWilshire May 14, 2015 9:34 PM

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-3...nd68forNLA.jpgHLA


There is a new introduction to my inventory of Fremont Place architecture here; the latest house history included is thate of establishment L. A. attorney and classic turn-of-the-20th-century booster Edwin A. Meserve, #82, seen at left above. At right is the John S. Shepherd house, #68. While The Paul Revere Williams Project (paulrwilliamsproject.org) does not list 68 Fremont Place as a project of the great architect, it's conceivable that the house was one of his very early efforts after becoming licensed in 1921—Williams designed a large number of houses in a variety of styles in newly developing Flintridge from the early '20s, including Mediterranean in a vein similar to #68. Given the impression of certain trademark mid-century themes remaining even beyond subsequent renovations of the house, Williams may well have been involved in a circa-1955 remodeling of 68, if not with the original 1923 design. Can anyone here on Noirish shed light on Williams's involvement with the house?

CityBoyDoug May 14, 2015 11:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GaylordWilshire (Post 7027710)
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-3...nd68forNLA.jpgHLA


There is a new introduction to my inventory of Fremont Place architecture here; the latest house history included is thate of establishment L. A. attorney and classic turn-of-the-20th-century booster Edwin A. Meserve, #82, seen at left above. At right is the John S. Shepherd house, #68. While The Paul Revere Williams Project (paulrwilliamsproject.org) does not list 68 Fremont Place as a project of the great architect, it's conceivable that the house was one of his very early efforts after becoming licensed in 1921—Williams designed a large number of houses in a variety of styles in newly developing Flintridge from the early '20s, including Mediterranean in a vein similar to #68. Given the impression of certain trademark mid-century themes remaining even beyond subsequent renovations of the house, Williams may well have been involved in a circa-1955 remodeling of 68, if not with the original 1923 design. Can anyone here on Noirish shed light on Williams's involvement with the house?

There are a few William's touches to the house such as the stair railings. It appears his influence was minimal in 1955.

No Street View of this neighborhood. Some owner has very much enlarged the original design of #68. The lovely Spanish revival style of the original house design has been obliterated and replaced with semi-French provincial.

This 8,934 square foot house sits on a 0.49 acre lot and features 7 bedrooms and 7 bathrooms. This property was built in 1923 and last sold on August 30, 2012 for $6,300,000.

Someone glued a gauche che' che' Beverly Hills style overhang on the front of the house....dreadful. The interior is plain in the extreme and the den is frightful to say the least. The brick fireplace in the den...was the designer drunk?


http://tours.tourfactory.com/tours/tour.asp?t=391101

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v4...psmftcss0y.jpg
GSV

Added on overhanging something with wrought iron columns. I do like the added wraparound driveway.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v4...psfccfavup.jpg
tourfactory

Martin Pal May 14, 2015 11:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MichaelRyerson (Post 7024048)
Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 7023973)
I recently came across this interesting photograph.

"Hitchhiking Sailors-Los Angeles"

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/128...540/bcxzZl.jpg
posted by Miss Magnolia Thunderpussy at http://www.ipernity.com/doc/57114/10...rd/989168/self

I believe the impressive building behind the sailors might be the Los Angeles Police Academy in Elysian Park, but I always thought it was fairly secluded.

:previous: So where the heck is this road?
__

Well, these two swabbies are trying to hitch a ride with this pretty girl in the 1941 Pontiac westbound on Chavez Ravine Road (now Stadium Way) out in front of, not the Police Academy but, the Navy and Marine Corps Reserve Center. Still there, now in service to the LAFD.

http://lh5.googleusercontent.com/-kp...8/DSC_0002.JPGThe Eastsider

http://livingnewdeal.org/wp-content/...rve_center.jpgLiving New Deal

I recalled something about this area with the Naval and Marine Corps Reserve Center that the historic plaque doesn't include, but should have.

This building was completed in 1941 as the nation was about to enter World War II. In 1943, two years after it opened, new recruits armed
with wooden clubs emerged from the compound and swept across the city, beating up young Mexican-American youths dressed in Zoot Suits.


A 70th Anniversary article on the riots included this account from a then 15-year-old Gene Cabral, who lived near
the naval center in Chavez Ravine:

Cabral’s house was less than two blocks from the Naval Armory where most of the mobs of soldiers began their attacks.
The assaults stunned him and his friends. “I guess all I thought is, ‘What the hell? If I go out there, someone is going to
beat me?’ ” he said. “It didn’t make sense to me. I just stayed in my house with my young mind trying to figure out
what we did wrong.”

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v1...ts/book008.jpgLos Angeles Almanac

Only a couple posts about this are on NLA, probably because most of the photos associated with the riot that
I have seen are of individuals and not really location specific, but mdiederi did a detailed post about the
Sleepy Lagoon Trial and the Zoot Suit Riots, also known as The Sailor Riots:

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...postcount=2580

Although tensions had been building in L.A. for several reasons, a May 31, 1943, brawl between zoot-suiters
and sailors seems to have been the catalyst for the riots that occurred soon after.

From a book by: Eduardo Obregón Pagán:

The attack on a group of military men that Monday night was the spark that ultimately touched off an explosion of rage.
Around 8:00 P.M. a dozen sailors and soldiers strolled down Main Street, and among them was Seaman Second Class
Joe Dacy Coleman. Near Chinatown the military men spotted a group of young women on the opposite sidewalk, and
most of the men — with the exception of Coleman and a soldier-crossed the street to talk to the women. Coleman
continued ahead, and as he passed a small grouping of zoot-suited boys, he saw, out of the corner of his eye, one of
the boys raising his arm in a manner that looked threatening. The sailor quickly spun around and seized the young
man’s arm. Something struck Coleman on the head from behind, and he fell to the ground unconscious, breaking his jaw
in two places.

Whether the young civilian acted in a threatening manner or not, Coleman clearly made the first aggressive contact
in seizing the young man by the arm, and the other civilian boys responded in kind. On the other side of the street young
civilian men pounced on the servicemen from all directions, seemingly out of nowhere, swinging rocks and bottles and
fists and feet with fury. In the midst of this fusillade the military men managed to fight their way over to where
Coleman lay and drag him off to safety. The triumph of the civilian youths would be short-lived, however, for it would
ultimately provide the sailors at the armory with all the justification they would need to take the law into their
own hands.

Here's a different look about the Zoot Suit Riots from this interesting article:

War in History of American Fashion
Zoot Suits: The Trend that Sparked a Riot

http://www.shmoop.com/history-american-fashion/war.html

From the article; mention of the Armory:

"Streaming out of the Naval Armory with weapons that ranged from tire irons to clubs and knives, they prowled
the streets looking for zoot suiters to rough up. They even invaded movie theaters, turning on the house lights in
mid-screening to reveal Chicano youths in the crowd. The mob's first victims, guilty of nothing but bad being in the wrong
place at the wrong time, were twelve- and thirteen-year-old boys who suffered beatings. Mexican-American
adolescents responded the following evening by driving past the Armory and shouting epithets at the guards.
That night, rampaging sailors caravanned miles across the city, into the heart of the Mexican-American barrios of East
Los Angeles and Boyle Heights, where they indiscriminately assaulted zoot-suited youths."


The following is a great link to a PBS page from a program they did on the riots.
If you click on this map it will take you to a timeline (of about two weeks) and
what happened each of those days as the riots progressed.

JUST CLICK ON THIS
LITTLE MAP TO OPEN IT:

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/zoot/pa...amap_intro.gif

CityBoyDoug May 15, 2015 12:03 AM

Howard Hughes
 
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v4...psz4ltedjq.jpg
noirLAfile CD

Howard Hughes - Mr. Noir

14 Jul 1936 — Howard Hughes age 31, billionaire, is shown here as he was booked on a suspicion of negligent homicide by Det. Lieut. Tom Sketchley (right), following a traffic accident in which Gabe S. Meyer, a pedestrian, was assertively struck and killed by Hughes’ automobile. Hughes was released on his own recognizance.

n the day of the accident Hughes was out driving with one of his many young lady friends. Hughes pushed her into the crowd before the police showed up. Originally a witness stated that Howard was driving at unsafe speeds, and that the pedestrian that was struck was standing in a streetcar safety zone.

By the time of the court hearing, the same witness stated that Hughes was driving at safe speeds, and that the pedestrian struck had stepped out of the safe zone, and in front of Howard’s car.

Ed Workman May 15, 2015 3:14 AM

Noir La Crescenta Raymond Chandler
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 7025309)
:previous: Thanks for sharing this with us HG.
Kind of eerie that you were digging up the detritus of the 1934 flood so many years later.
__



I've been trying to find information on the 'Van Deusen Estate', that was also noted on the 1934 flood map.
If you turn your head to the left and squint ;), you can see that it was located on 'Castle Road'.
That makes me wonder if the road was named after the estate? (that is, if the estate resembled a castle)

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/800...540/26MuWk.jpg

So far, I haven't come up with anything.
__

It finally occurred to me
I guess I assumed that everybody on here has read all the Raymond Chandler one could find.
But have y'all?
The La C flood made me think of one of Chandler's early works- maybe "Nevada Gas" wherein the hero leaves a bad guy cuffed to a corpse in a flood ravaged and abandoned house.
And although I looked at all the old pages of lanoir before I joined up, I don't recall any study of Chandler locations. [but maybe Geiger's house on La Verne Terrace has been ?] Usta be folks ran Chandler bus tours to visit existing buildings that Chandler used in his stories- often under disguised names, such as the town of Rialito.
Chandler was hyped as seeing LA with an 'X-ray eye'
For my money , that was a pretty good description of most of his work, especially pre-WW2

Otis Criblecoblis May 15, 2015 3:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ed Workman (Post 7028117)
It finally occurred to me
I guess I assumed that everybody on here has read all the Raymond Chandler one could find.
But have y'all?
The La C flood made me think of one of Chandler's early works- maybe "Nevada Gas" wherein the hero leaves a bad guy cuffed to a corpse in a flood ravaged and abandoned house.

Yes, it is "Nevada Gas." He calls the area "Montrose", but today of course it is part of the City of La Cañada Flintridge.

The area of Griffith Park adjacent to the intersection of Los Feliz and Riverside is also used as a scene setting in that story, and Montrose is used again in another story, though I can't recall which one right now.

Flyingwedge May 15, 2015 4:04 AM

16 Thornton Avenue
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 7027348)
I don't believe we've seen this unique building on NLA yet.

It's located in Venice at Speedway and Thornton Avenue.

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/102...661/XGPhym.jpg
https://www.flickr.com/photos/383105...n/photostream/

I've been trying to find a vintage photograph of it, and some further information.
Surely it shows up in some old aerials. (but I haven't spotted it yet)

-are there Sanborn maps available for the Venice area?
__

Yes there are, er! Below, north is on the left, so 16 Thornton Avenue is on the SE corner:
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...f.jpg~original
1918 Santa Monica Sanborn Map @ LAPL

The next previous Sanborn Map is 1909, and it shows nothing larger than a two-story house on any corner of Speedway and Thornton.
There were two small cottages at 16 and, in the back, 16-1/2 Thornton Avenue on the 1909 map.

This April 6, 1912 Southwest Contractor and Manufacturer article must refer to 16 Thornton Avenue:
http://i1165.photobucket.com/albums/...f.jpg~original
HathiTrust -- http://babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?i...ew=1up;seq=701

Los Angeles County gives a build date of 1913 and an effective built date of 1916 for 16 Thornton Avenue.

tovangar2 May 15, 2015 5:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Martin Pal (Post 7027889)
http://livingnewdeal.org/wp-content/...rve_center.jpgLiving New Deal

I recalled something about this area with the Naval and Marine Corps Reserve Center that the historic plaque doesn't include, but should have.

Thank you Martin for the great post. I had somehow not connected the Naval and Marine Corp Reserve Center complex with the 'Sailor Riots'. You're right, the history should be on the plaque, especially since it actually touts the film location history as if there's nothing else to say.


----------------------------------------------------------------------------


Quote:

Originally Posted by CityBoyDoug (Post 7027838)

LOL, will we never agree on anything CBD? I like the 'new' front, including the squared French windows and shutters. Ditto the stair rail. I wouldn't be surprised if they were both Williams. (Oh, wait we do agree on that clunky brick fireplace.)


.

onyx91977 May 15, 2015 7:23 AM

Hi, I just found this post which made me join this forum. I would like to say THANK you for posting this. I know it was posted 4 or years ago but THANK you! Also the links for three of the pictures are broken and I was just wondering what those pictures are of and do you still have them?

Thanks again!!


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