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tovangar2 Apr 27, 2013 5:06 PM

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ethereal_reality Apr 27, 2013 6:27 PM

I just came across this illustration of the Maier Brewery that includes the massive stock house, as well as the bottling plant
across the street.

Los Angeles Herald 1908
http://imageshack.us/a/img689/1844/a...ewery1908a.jpg
http://chroniclingamerica.loc.gov/


the complete ad
http://imageshack.us/a/img69/438/aaa...rewery1908.jpg
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ethereal_reality Apr 27, 2013 11:19 PM

I don't believe we've seen this photograph from 1886.

Corner of Bellevue Avenue and Buena Vista Street, looking southwest toward Fort Moore.
(Buena Vista was later renamed Broadway Street)

http://imageshack.us/a/img203/1878/a...re1886lasp.jpg
http://www.library.ucla.edu/specialc...jects#changing
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lemster2024 Apr 27, 2013 11:21 PM

A few additonal shots of the interior of the Pacific Mutual building
 
I'm a little late getting these uploaded, but here are a few more views of the Pacific Mutual building taken during a walking tour back in February. They are not 100% in focus, mainly due to my photography skills (or lack thereof) and the limitations of my cellphone's camera...!

detail of statuary above 6th Street entrance
http://img801.imageshack.us/img801/818/dsc00746ag.jpg

Interior view through mezzanine, coffered ceilings, doorway detail, etc.:
http://img823.imageshack.us/img823/7647/dsc00750a.jpg

http://img855.imageshack.us/img855/4961/dsc00753a.jpg

http://img5.imageshack.us/img5/7499/dsc00754a.jpg

http://img824.imageshack.us/img824/6325/dsc00749as.jpg

http://img441.imageshack.us/img441/4503/dsc00752a.jpg

ethereal_reality Apr 27, 2013 11:32 PM

:previous: very nice lemster2024. thx for sharing.

ethereal_reality Apr 27, 2013 11:42 PM

In 1857 Joseph Mullally built a fine residence of single-story brick on the southeast corner of Buena Vista Street and College Street.
It later became the home of Charles B. Woodhead. It was said to be the first brick house in Los Angeles.


This view is from 1883
http://imageshack.us/a/img853/4047/aabbrick2.jpg
http://digital2.library.ucla.edu/





7 years later
http://imageshack.us/a/img687/340/aabbrick1900.jpg
http://digital2.library.ucla.edu/

I don't recall ever seeing a photograph of this house before. Does anyone know how long it stood?
__

For more information on Mr. Mullally/tovanger2 provided this link in an earlier post.
http://calbricks.netfirms.com/brick.mullallybm.html

tovangar2 Apr 28, 2013 12:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 6107535)
In 1857 Joseph Mullally built a fine residence of single-story brick on the southeast corner of Buena Vista Street and College Street.

For more information on Mr. Mullally/tovanger2 provided this link in an earlier post.
http://calbricks.netfirms.com/brick.mullallybm.html


I love the "Tudor" chimney pots and the French Second-Empire roofline combined with the ramshackle fence and the very utilitarian mailbox.

Calbricks claims Jesse Devine Hunter built the first brick house in LA (the one next to the Round House near 3rd and Main): http://calbricks.netfirms.com/brick.hunter.html

I dunno.

Mullally's Pioneer Brick Co did build our old friend The Eagle Mill for Abel Stearns.

Albany NY Apr 28, 2013 12:25 AM

Simple and Beautiful
 
Originally posted by ethereal_reality

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 6107535)
In 1857 Joseph Mullally built a fine residence of single-story brick on the southeast corner of Buena Vista Street and College Street.
It later became the home of Charles B. Woodhead. It was said to be the first brick house in Los Angeles.


This view is from 1883
http://imageshack.us/a/img853/4047/aabbrick2.jpg
http://digital2.library.ucla.edu/





7 years later
http://imageshack.us/a/img687/340/aabbrick1900.jpg
http://digital2.library.ucla.edu/

I don't recall ever seeing a photograph of this house before. Does anyone know how long it stood?
__

For more information on Mr. Mullally/tovanger2 provided this link in an earlier post.
http://calbricks.netfirms.com/brick.mullallybm.html

I'm wondering about the timeline in these two shots. It looks to me as if the first photo was shot several years after the second shot. The brickwork and chimneys seem cleaner in the second photo. Also, I figured the front porch was added after construction, rather than taken down after a few years. But then again, I'm usually wrong!

Also, T2 mentioned the mailbox. I don't remember mailboxes being discussed here before. It certainly appears like an early (and yet very modern) mailbox, or did the Brady kids bring their Tiki back to LA from Hawaii?
http://imageshack.us/a/img801/8951/tikir.jpg

Also, I'm struck by the preponderance of power lines. How widespread was electric service in LA in the 1880's? Which leads to this question....how dangerous was home electricity at that time?

belmont bob Apr 28, 2013 12:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 6107535)
In 1857 Joseph Mullally built a fine residence of single-story brick on the southeast corner of Buena Vista Street and College Street.
It later became the home of Charles B. Woodhead. It was said to be the first brick house in Los Angeles.


This view is from 1883
http://imageshack.us/a/img853/4047/aabbrick2.jpg
http://digital2.library.ucla.edu/





7 years later
http://imageshack.us/a/img687/340/aabbrick1900.jpg
http://digital2.library.ucla.edu/

I don't recall ever seeing a photograph of this house before. Does anyone know how long it stood?
__

For more information on Mr. Mullally/tovanger2 provided this link in an earlier post.
http://calbricks.netfirms.com/brick.mullallybm.html

Looking at these two pictures I think one of them was printed backwards. Check out the palm trees and power lines, plus some kind of horizontal structure visible on the side under the power lines…also unless the floor plan was perfectly symmetrical, a rear occurrence, the side door and window patterns are exactly the same. The ramshackled front porch which would seem to only cover half the main entry on the first photo must have wrapped around the side to pick up the two doors at one time. In spite of its condition, it is still a beautiful house though. I love the twin chimneys.

and of course it's the chimneys that give it away...hahaha ..spent too much time looking at the details and missed the obvious...so what is all that stuff over by the power lines..was there a substation at that location? and are those power lines or are they phone? someone will have to set me straight on when both came to socal


ok, so if the dates are correct then these must be phone lines...seems like a lot but i'm ready for some learning here...or are the dates wrong???

Matthew Apr 28, 2013 12:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MichaelRyerson (Post 6107145)
Yep. Good Man, Mark.

I sometimes see Mathew or Mathieu, but this is the first time I've seen Mark. It doesn't change how I view the movie. I worked on independent films and music videos a few years back, when a friend asked me to try it (I became known for an interesting audio clip this friend liked). I was a post production artist and was often the person trying to correct the mistakes, which included everything from a lens hood used indoors to airplanes in the audio. I also once had to remove a company name from boxes. It was hard work, but also fun.

I see where the wrap-around porch was attached in the last photograph and the side doors, with nothing below them. I think the dates are correct. Electricity back then was lights and they weren't very bright (didn't draw much current). A coffered ceiling in a nice Victorian home could have several bulbs as part of the decoration. It would take a ceiling of bulbs to light the room. As electric appliances became popular, electric companies ran ads telling people to update their wiring. Lights would often dim, as appliances draw more current than the wiring was designed for, and I'm sure you can find some of the ads around.

tovangar2 Apr 28, 2013 1:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lemster2024 (Post 6107520)
detail of statuary above 6th Street entrance
http://img801.imageshack.us/img801/818/dsc00746ag.jpg

I think I've mentioned before that the figures are by Jo Mora (1876-1947). He sounds a really nice guy. Born in Uruguay to a Catalonian sculptor father and a French intellectual mother, the family immigrated to the US in 1880. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jo_Mora

Mora in 1927:
https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/-6...10150%2BPM.jpg
http://caviews.com/jomora.htm

Mora was well-known by the public for his often-humorous historic maps. This one's of LA:
https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-Y...10337%2BPM.jpg
http://www.kcet.org/socal/departures...story-map.html

He could also give Frederic Remington a run for his money:
https://lh4.googleusercontent.com/-N...10528%2BPM.jpg
http://www.thecalifornian.com/articl...-rodeo-exhibit



Quote:

Originally Posted by belmont bob (Post 6107576)
Looking at these two pictures I think one of them was printed backwards.

Good eye belmont bob! That went right past me.



LOL Matthew. "They'll fix it in post". How many gazillion times has that been said?

ethereal_reality Apr 28, 2013 2:27 AM

re: Mullally's brick home.

Quote:

Originally Posted by belmont bob (Post 6107576)
Looking at these two pictures I think one of them was printed backwards. It's the chimneys that give it away....I spent too much time looking at the details and missed the obvious.

I noticed the chimneys too, but decided to post the two photographs as I found them since there was no way to figure out which one was correct.
__

Matthew Apr 28, 2013 2:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tovangar2 (Post 6107602)
LOL Matthew. "They'll fix it in post". How many gazillion times has that been said?

It's not a big deal. Don't worry about it. I thought it was worth a laugh. :haha: My name is often misspelled, but it's usually a missing 't'. :D

ethereal_reality Apr 28, 2013 2:42 AM

This is an amazing photograph, especially if the date is correct.

http://imageshack.us/a/img14/9048/aablosangeles1860.jpg
old cd of mine/ possibly ebay

Is the long one-story building(s) in the distance the origins of Calle de los Negros?




1894 Sanborn
http://imageshack.us/a/img856/2190/a...negroalley.jpg
http://ladailymirror.com/2011/10/13/...shed-landmark/
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ethereal_reality Apr 28, 2013 3:03 AM

...another rarity, an adobe across from the courthouse. (no date)

http://imageshack.us/a/img547/1119/a...balderaina.jpg
old cd of mine.

I wonder what hotel that is at far right? (notice the rooftop sign)
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tovangar2 Apr 28, 2013 3:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 6107642)
This is an amazing photograph, especially if the date is correct.

http://imageshack.us/a/img14/9048/aablosangeles1860.jpg
ebay

__

Wow, look at that! Look what's there, El Aliso, the gas works, Masonic Hall (Nov, 1858), etc and what's not there, Pico House, the Brunswig, all kinds of stuff.
I'm gonna be looking at this for a long time. Thank you so much e_r!

And yes, that's the beginnings of the Alley, 11 years before the Chinese Massacre.

P.S. Here's the Ruxton map MR posted to ID everything:
Quote:

Originally Posted by MichaelRyerson (Post 6092733)
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7275/7...c7241753_o.jpg[/url]
http://=http://www.flickr.com/photos...622/]PlazaMap3

Map of the old portion of the city surrounding the plaza, showing the old plaza church, public square, the first gas plant and adode buildings, Los Angeles city, March 12th, 1873 / A.G. Ruxton, surveyor.

Library of Congress



Is this photo currently for sale? I'm dying to see the listing.

ethereal_reality Apr 28, 2013 3:29 AM

http://imageshack.us/a/img14/9048/aablosangeles1860.jpg


T2, for comparison sake, almost the same view with Pico House in 1876.

http://imageshack.us/a/img12/2082/aa...1860now187.jpg
http://waterandpower.org/museum/Earl...20(1800s).html

It's amazing to see the 1858 Masonic Building pretty much alone in the 1860 photograph.
(it's just to the right of the Merced Theater in the later photo) -fun stuff!
__

tovangar2 Apr 28, 2013 3:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 6107669)
http://imageshack.us/a/img14/9048/aablosangeles1860.jpg


T2, for comparison sake, almost the same view with Pico House in 1876.

http://imageshack.us/a/img12/2082/aa...1860now187.jpg
http://waterandpower.org/museum/Earl...20(1800s).html

It's amazing to see the 1858 Masonic Building pretty much alone in the 1860 photograph.
(it's just to the right of the Merced Theater in the later photo) -fun stuff!

How long have you had this?

Can you put a larger version up?



The two photos together give a much fuller idea of what was going on then. Totally thrilling :-)
Except for the new paint and extension on the Carrillo/Pico Adobe, they almost look like they were taken on the same day.
(I wish I had the skills to splice the two into a panorama)

That must be the Signoret Building at lower right. (You remember Judge Hayes, he granted Biddy Mason her freedom after Sheriff Barton served a writ on her scoundrel of an owner.)
Wow, I'm not going to sleep tonight.

MichaelRyerson Apr 28, 2013 4:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Matthew (Post 6107577)
I sometimes see Mathew or Mathieu, but this is the first time I've seen Mark. It doesn't change how I view the movie. I worked on independent films and music videos a few years back, when a friend asked me to try it (I became known for an interesting audio clip this friend liked). I was a post production artist and was often the person trying to correct the mistakes, which included everything from a lens hood used indoors to airplanes in the audio. I also once had to remove a company name from boxes. It was hard work, but also fun.

I see where the wrap-around porch was attached in the last photograph and the side doors, with nothing below them. I think the dates are correct. Electricity back then was lights and they weren't very bright (didn't draw much current). A coffered ceiling in a nice Victorian home could have several bulbs as part of the decoration. It would take a ceiling of bulbs to light the room. As electric appliances became popular, electric companies ran ads telling people to update their wiring. Lights would often dim, as appliances draw more current than the wiring was designed for, and I'm sure you can find some of the ads around.


Lol. I thought for a brief moment about going back and editing my original faux pas as a nod to your former profession but thought the better of it. Probably too droll for this room. Sorry, Matt, sometimes I'm a dope.

tovangar2 Apr 28, 2013 5:46 AM

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