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KevinW Apr 19, 2013 7:27 PM

Also found this on another Skyscraper forum:

Wilshire & Bonnie Brae 1937
http://imageshack.us/a/img534/1080/1...lvdandbonn.jpg


and this where I see one on the Simons corner of Wilshire:

http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3093/2...374daf97_o.jpg
army.arch

tovangar2 Apr 19, 2013 7:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KevinW (Post 6098087)

Thx. I've seen that, but it doesn't mention the figures, nor are they obvious from the photo.

fhammon Apr 19, 2013 8:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 6096921)

Thanks ER and PHX31.
My grandmother's name was Franc Hammon. She died back in the early '20s.
I'd like to think that's the name there. It almost looks like it. The handwriting looks masculine to me, however.
....Also the building was completed in 1923. Judging by the surrounding trees and vegetation, I'd say the photo was taken years later.
She would have been gone already by late 1924.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angelus_Temple

westcork Apr 19, 2013 8:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KevinW (Post 6098087)
Just found this page about L.A. street signs (http://militantangeleno.blogspot.com...-of-times.html) that includes this:

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-ZNllD3Ci1m...e_Wilshire.jpg

The "Four-Sided Trapezoid" Sign: This example, which may or may not have been a City standard sign, was taken in 1937 on the corner of Bonnie Brae Street and Wilshire Blvd (below the street sign was a speed limit sign indicating 20 mph...so times haven't really changed, lol) in the Westlake District. The sign was placed on a lamp post and has four sides, two of which indicate the street the sign face is parallel to. The sign had white letter on a dark (black we assume) background, and featured the street name in large all-caps typeface, street type in smaller typeface and the block number at the bottom. It was also made of wood, and is so far is the only example the Militant has seen, so it may or may not be unique to the Wilshire Blvd corridor.


Here is another one from LAPL mounted in the middle of a WW2 back-out pentaglobe
http://jpg1.lapl.org/00078/00078300.jpg
LAPL

fhammon Apr 19, 2013 8:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tovangar2 (Post 6097054)
On second thought, I think you're right KevinW, "Came out last week" seems more likely, especially since the "L" isn't capitalized. "Love" seems plausible too, but I see "Harmon", not "Hammon" (unless it's "Hamron" or "Hannon")

Thanks, tovangar2
I sign my name almost the same way but with a lazy, abbreviated 2nd "m".

tovangar2 Apr 19, 2013 8:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by westcork (Post 6098201)
Here is another one from LAPL mounted in the middle of a WW2 back-out pentaglobe

That one appears to actually be part of the pentaglobe standard and have glass signage panels rather than wood, plus no figures :-(

fhammon Apr 19, 2013 9:07 PM

Sorry if I brought this up before but I've always been curious about this stack of triangular objects in the bottom center of this 1869 Plaza photo.
Does anybody have any idea what they are?

http://waterandpower.org/DWP-LA%20Pu...plaza_1869.jpghttp://waterandpower.org/museum/Earl...Page_1%29.html

Something similar is noted in the upper left corner of the Plaza in the 1873 map, drawn as three horseshoe shaped objects.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/95072967@N02/8663075373/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/95072967@N02/8663075373/

KevinW Apr 19, 2013 9:33 PM

They look like toilet seats. Or watering troughs for animals

ConstructDTLA Apr 19, 2013 11:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 6096539)
The A.G. Bartlett Building is a 14-story building at 215 W. 7th Street. When completed in 1911 it was the tallest building
in Los Angeles for five years. -Designed by well-known Los Angeles architects John Parkinson & Edwin Bergstrom in the Beaux Arts style.


http://imageshack.us/a/img534/5986/a...fromspring.jpg
gvs

The Union Oil Co. occupied the upper floors from 1911 to 1923.


__

Great pics of the Bartlett! I lived in there for some time recently. I wish so badly they couldve restored the ground floors to their original grandeur... The tile work throughout the building & all throughout the ground floor garage (the garage is 3 levels total - basement - 2nd floor) is really amazing.

Theres no chance anyone has more pictures or interior pictures of Bartlett on hand is there?

Heres an image I have of a picture that was hung in the lobby.

http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8241/8...312cb648_b.jpg

tovangar2 Apr 20, 2013 12:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HunterK (Post 6098429)
Heres an image I have of a picture that was hung in the lobby.

Nice pic! It catches the edge of the Adohr creamery sign on the roof of the Haas Building, next door to the Bartlett to the west across Frank Court. The Haas is another one that's lost almost all its detail:
https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/-J...646%2520PM.jpg
gsv

What happened? Did everyone read Adolf Loos' Crime and Ornament on the same day or sumpin?

lemster2024 Apr 20, 2013 12:42 AM

Greetings to all!
 
Greetings to everyone! Am new to this thread, but have spent the past several weeks catching up from the start way back when! I'm so impressed by the knowledge shown by everyone and all of the images posted to date. Like some of you, I grew up in Los Angeles (in the shadow of the Sports Arena) and am familiar with many of the buildings, landmarks, and historical anecdotes that have been mentioned, but not to the extent of everyone else's level of expertise! Hopefully, in the days ahead I might be able to contribute something everyone can enjoy!

tovangar2 Apr 20, 2013 1:25 AM

Hi lemster2024,

Welcome to the house that ethereal_reality built

tovangar2 Apr 20, 2013 2:14 AM

.

sopas ej Apr 20, 2013 2:35 AM

Hey folks! I thought this was an interesting short film; OK, not necessarily related to noir/old Los Angeles, but interesting nonetheless, at least to me. It shows footage of various traffic lights throughout the US, back in 1937. To think that back then, signals were still not standardized--but then we already knew that, huh, with Los Angeles' semaphore signals.

Speaking of which, this video does show a clip of LA's semaphores, as well as the banjo-type of signal, in operation.

Courtesy of Chevrolet!

http://img163.imageshack.us/img163/5720/banjosignal.png
From "Seeing Green"

How Traffic Lights Work (1937)

alanlutz Apr 20, 2013 2:40 AM

westcork, great find on the close-up of the Spanish American War Statue in the park. Found this on Wikipedia: A monument to California's 20 Spanish-American War dead was erected in 1900; it is allegedly modeled after a Spanish-American War veteran, 7th California Infantry volunteer Charlie Hammond of San Francisco, and is believed to be the oldest work of public art in Los Angeles. The Los Angeles City Council declared it a historic-cultural monument in 1990.[1]

tovangar2 Apr 20, 2013 3:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by alanlutz (Post 6098627)
westcork, great find on the close-up of the Spanish American War Statue in the park. Found this on Wikipedia: A monument to California's 20 Spanish-American War dead was erected in 1900; it is allegedly modeled after a Spanish-American War veteran, 7th California Infantry volunteer Charlie Hammond of San Francisco, and is believed to be the oldest work of public art in Los Angeles. The Los Angeles City Council declared it a historic-cultural monument in 1990.[1]

It should be noted that the twenty soldiers of the 7th, named on the monument, did not die in the war, but during it. The regiment was sent from Los Angeles to train at the Presidio in San Francisco in May 1898, returning in October. Nineteen died from illness during that time, the twentieth lingered a bit longer. The regiment never shipped out.

The Protocol of Peace, ending hostilities, was signed on 12 Aug '98, The Treaty of Paris on 10 December. The treaty was ratified by Congress in February of the following year.
http://www.militarymuseum.org/7thInfUSVMem.html

John Hay, the Secretary of State, described the S-A as, "A splendid little war". It made Harrison Gray Otis' rep. He loved it.


P.S.
There's some other posts on the monument on pages 690-691

The US lost 332 killed during the S-A war with an additional 2,957 dying from disease. 1,641 were wounded. I don't know how many of were from California. I also don't know if the deaths-from-disease total includes those that never left the States or died in transit to the front.
http://www.spanamwar.com/casualties.htm

MichaelRyerson Apr 20, 2013 1:06 PM

Recently posted about the Richfield honchos and their plane, so I thought we'd do Standard Oil...



http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8252/8...d899092f_o.png
Standard Oil executives at United Airport, Burbank, CA, 1931

You'll notice it's a company plane.

USC digital archive/Dick Whittington Photography Collection, 1924-1987


http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8250/8...82a74ba3_o.png
Standard Oil executives at United Airport, Burbank, CA, 1931 (2)

Good-bye, dear...

USC digital archive/Dick Whittington Photography Collection, 1924-1987


http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8261/8...54a2d628_o.png
Standard Oil executives at United Airport, Burbank, CA, 1931 (3)

Wow, what a plane!

USC digital archive/Dick Whittington Photography Collection, 1924-1987

MichaelRyerson Apr 20, 2013 1:22 PM

Welcome lemster2024, always room for one more! And HunterK, alanlutz and sopas! Gee, this is great.

MichaelRyerson Apr 20, 2013 1:33 PM

Here are some of Wilshire Boulevard that I don't think we've seen before...


http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8241/8...6f4c0e80_o.png
Traffic on Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, 1931

Bumper to bumper, were it ever thus...great signage in these shots...

USC digital archive/Dick Whittington Photography Collection, 1924-1987


http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8244/8...faf60eac_o.png
Traffic on Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, 1931 (2)

Nice shot of a Wilshire Special hard at work...

USC digital archive/Dick Whittington Photography Collection, 1924-1987


http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8249/8...1f36f486_o.png
Traffic on Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, 1931 (3)

Coming up out of Lafayette Park? Wilshire Specials marching to the west...

USC digital archive/Dick Whittington Photography Collection, 1924-1987


http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8245/8...81be2f05_o.png
Traffic on Wilshire Boulevard, Los Angeles, 1931 (4)

Going home...

USC digital archive/Dick Whittington Photography Collection, 1924-1987

sopas ej Apr 20, 2013 5:14 PM

Great photos of Wilshire Blvd., MichaelRyerson! I love how you can see the wicker seating on that Wilshire Blvd. double-decker bus.

Quote:

Originally Posted by MichaelRyerson (Post 6096399)
http://farm9.staticflickr.com/8121/8...82a20e37_o.png
Oil Can Restaurant, Montebello, CA, 1928

USC digital archive/Dick Whittington Photography Collection, 1924-1987

A tribute or nod to the Montebello Oil Fields, maybe? They still exist, BTW. Near the shopping mall up in the hills, you can see some of the pumps pumping away.


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