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MichaelRyerson May 24, 2016 11:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Martin Pal (Post 7450968)
Prologue: I hope all my Hollywood Canteen posts haven't become too tedious for anyone.

The following photo was captioned: "Gene (left) with fellow crew member waiting for a show at
the Hollywood Canteen in 1943." If they're waiting, I'm not sure of their location, if it indeed
was around the canteen, it doesn't look familiar. But, neither did the greenery in the first one!

https://honortheveteransblog.files.w...014/12/003.jpg

As I was about to post this, I had a thought about where they might be in the above photograph,
but I'll see if anyone else might have an idea first so as not to cloud anyone's thoughts.

More info about Gene Whitmire HERE and HERE.

Certainly not tedious in any way. I believe Gene and his friend are visiting Crossroads of the World.

Tetsu May 25, 2016 2:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BifRayRock (Post 7450725)

Ooh, very nice. Never seen the Ems' Victorian neighbor to the south other than the occasional turret poking up behind photos of the Ems herself. Anybody know anything about the house?

CityBoyDoug May 25, 2016 3:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MichaelRyerson (Post 7452106)
Certainly not tedious in any way. I believe Gene and his friend are visiting Crossroads of the World.

Good guess. It stumped me for sure. I did see the map but did not make that connection. I hope you are correct Michael.

HenryHuntington May 25, 2016 3:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 7451485)
I could be wrong, but I don't believe we've seen this image on NLA.

Pacific Electric Ticket Office and Trolley Cafe at 1450 Ocean Avenue in Santa Monica.

http://imagizer.imageshack.us/v2/128...923/42nXwY.jpg
http://westside-historic.tumblr.com/image/144739780641

Could this be the last day of service? -hence all the photographers. (also there are two white flags on the streetcar)

__

I believe this was a fantrip, er. Last runs tended to be wee-hours affairs, as PE's operational day broke at 3:30 a.m. Still a pretty photo, though.

Wig-Wag May 25, 2016 4:19 AM

End of Track and Back Polling
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 7450739)
:previous: Whoa, I noticed all sorts of things in that photograph but not the end of the tracks.

So they just stop.....no barricade or anything....is that normal?

You blew my mind Ed

Having the rails simply terminate in the asphalt at the end of a streetcar line was quite common on street railways. A bumper post sufficient to stop a slowly moving car would have proven hazardous to both vehicular and pedestrian traffic. Anything smaller and less substantial would not stop even a slowly moving car. Moreover, a motorman approaching the end of track would be exercising caution to prevent an overrun. That said, overuns did occur from time to time.

Returning momentarily to the discussion of trolley poles indicating direction of travel, there were exceptions. For short distance reverse moves, such as coupling to another car or moving through a switch from one track to another at a terminal or backing into a car barn, a technique called back polling could be employed.

In these situations, the motorman of a conventional streetcar would generally lower the window in front of his operating station and hold onto the cord connecting the pole to the retriever. If the pole should leave the wire he could pull it down sufficiently to prevent it from snagging the overhead support wires.
This technique was commonly used when backing a single ended streamline car such as a PCC. These cars were equipped with a control station at the rear of the car. The rear window could be opened to access the retriever cord.

So, if you encounter a photo of a streetcar with the motorman leaning out the end window of a car holding the retriever cord and possibly even looking up at the end of the pole on the wire, there is a very good chance the car is back polling.

Backing polling over longer distances was not uncommon with electric freight locomotives when switching. In such cases a brakeman would stand on the locomotive end platform and monitor the pole. The top photo on this page illustrates this type of operation.

http://www.pacificelectric.org/pacif...-at-lone-hill/

Cheers,
Jack

JeffDiego May 25, 2016 5:06 AM

Hollywood Canteen
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by Martin Pal (Post 7451590)
Thank you JeffDiego and John Maddox Roberts for your assistance!




Here's everyone's best guesses as to whom is pictured on the Hollywood Hall of Honor so far:



--Jeff, I wasn't quite sure which photograph you had pointed out for Glenn Ford.

--I have a feeling that a couple so-far unnamed photos are directors. Could one be George Stevens?

--I had to look up "Shepperd Strudwick." Really long career in film and television, including the Best Picture winner "All the King's Men" and the great "A Place in the Sun." Also in "The Reckless Moment," a film I probably saw because I looked for it when the remake, titled "The Deep End," came out.

Hi Martin:

Glenn Ford is (I'm pretty sure it's him, photo is blurry) next to Robert Stack in the photo showing Al Ybarra and Bunny Waters. The guy in Naval Whites is clearer in this same photo, almost in front of Al Ybarra's stomach... pretty sure that's indeed Richard Ney.
Can't say any of the photos look definitely like director George Stevens, but he is likely there - and yes, some of the other faces are likely other directors and various non-actors.
Although most of these men's names would not be familiar to young people now, need I mention that there were a number of mostly-female stars then (Lucy, Crawford, Davis, Garland etc.) who are still pretty well-known names today. Books & articles are still being written about them. Who of today's "names" (though some are outstanding actors) will be remembered & written about 70 years from now? Probably none. The stars of the studio system were unique.

mdiederi May 25, 2016 5:49 AM

Searched the thread and couldn't find anything about this newspaper headline I stumbled upon on the internet. Anyone have other info?

http://images.rarenewspapers.com/eba...8/image051.jpg
rarenewspapers.com/

mrfredmertz May 25, 2016 8:08 AM

Re the Great Air Battle Newspaper
 
Is that a prop from the movie 1941? Notice the lines around the article are broken only around that one story. [edit later] And I'm wrong. Oh well......

Ed Workman May 25, 2016 3:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mdiederi (Post 7452521)
Searched the thread and couldn't find anything about this newspaper headline I stumbled upon on the internet. Anyone have other info?
ihttp://images.rarenewspapers.com/eba...8/image051.jpg
rarenewspapers.com/

Google "Battle of Los Angeles"
then vary the search term to include "Ellwood"
Nerves were edgy as all heck due to the torpedoing and sinking of SS Montebello off Cayucos [ Northwest of San Luis Obispo] in December 1941
Then in Jan submarine [IIRC I-35] surfaced off Ellwood, near what is now the UCSB campus, and lobbed several shells into the oil refinery, causing minor damage.
The BoLA caused a few deaths and injuries- heart attacks traffic collisions and falls in the blackout, but underwear sales skyrocketed.
No lives lost at Ellwood or Cayucos.
In Japan colorized postcards were sold to celebrate I-35's exploits

Ed Workman May 25, 2016 4:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ethereal_reality (Post 7450739)
:previous: Whoa, I noticed all sorts of things in that photograph but not the end of the tracks.

So they just stop.....no barricade or anything....is that normal?

You blew my mind Ed

The lack of barrier didn't prevent running off the track, but usually a barrier was unnecessary, and a barrier would be a hazard to auto traffic
IF there any similar conditions extant- probly there are- one can see grooves in the asphalt made by the flanges. As long as the speed was sufficiently slow that only one wheelset maybe two, had left the end, and not so far as to deprive the pole of wire contact, a car could be walked back to safety. The accessories from the wrecker truck might be needed to align things, but not always.
Loss of electrical contacts would require a heavy tow. As seen in these pages, LARy had a special car for such duty

Ed Workman May 25, 2016 4:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mdiederi (Post 7452521)
Searched the thread and couldn't find anything about this newspaper headline I stumbled upon on the internet. Anyone have other info?

http://images.rarenewspapers.com/eba...8/image051.jpg
rarenewspapers.com/

I explained the Ellwood connection
But see the lower right corner of the newspaper about spies and the submarine.
No spies were involved; the sub's skipper had traversed the coast with a sharp eye in a surface ship before the war .

HossC May 25, 2016 4:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ed Workman (Post 7452837)

Google "Battle of Los Angeles"
then vary the search term to include "Ellwood"
Nerves were edgy as all heck due to the torpedoing and sinking of SS Montebello off Cayucos [ Northwest of San Luis Obispo] in December 1941
Then in Jan submarine [IIRC I-35] surfaced off Ellwood, near what is now the UCSB campus, and lobbed several shells into the oil refinery, causing minor damage.
The BoLA caused a few deaths and injuries- heart attacks traffic collisions and falls in the blackout, but underwear sales skyrocketed.
No lives lost at Ellwood or Cayucos.
In Japan colorized postcards were sold to celebrate I-35's exploits

You can read more on Wikipedia's Battle of Los Angeles page. The article contains a link to another about the bombardment of Ellwood.

HossC May 25, 2016 7:29 PM

We're staying in West Hollywood for today's Julius Shulman post. This is "Job 5566: Arthur W. Larsen, Villa Madrid (West Hollywood, Calif.), 1978".

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...1.jpg~original

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...2.jpg~original

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...3.jpg~original

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...4.jpg~original

All from Getty Research Institute

I recognized the Villa Madrid's unusual brickwork straight away because it was used as a filming location for the 1972 movie 'Hickey & Boggs'. Bill Cosby discovers a dead body there, while Robert Culp can be seen driving up Miller Drive with the now-demolished Tiffany Theater on Sunset Boulevard in the background. From the movie, here's a policeman drinking coffee on the balcony that's visible in the first Shulman picture.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...5.jpg~original
MGM

This view roughly duplicates the last Shulman picture.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...6.jpg~original
GSV

I'll finish with an aerial view of the 1929 apartments.

http://i809.photobucket.com/albums/z...7.jpg~original
Google Maps

Martin Pal May 25, 2016 8:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JeffDiego (Post 7452494)
Glenn Ford is (I'm pretty sure it's him, photo is blurry) next to Robert Stack in the photo showing Al Ybarra and Bunny Waters. The guy in Naval Whites is clearer in this same photo, almost in front of Al Ybarra's stomach... pretty sure that's indeed Richard Ney

Thanks, Jeff, it does look like Glenn Ford. That photo doesn't appear to be in the larger shot of the wall unless it is one of the ones cut off. (It doesn't look like it's the cut-off one next to Robert Stack, either, though, because the Ford photo has a really dark background on the left. Updated Richard Ney status on previous post, too.

_______________

Quote:

Originally Posted by MichaelRyerson (Post 7452106)
I believe Gene and his friend are visiting Crossroads of the World.

Quote:

Originally Posted by CityBoyDoug (Post 7452400)
Good guess. It stumped me for sure. I did see the map but did not make that connection. I hope you are correct Michael.

Yes, Michael, that's what came to my mind, too!

I do think these two sailors are at The Crossroads of the World. It's not far from the Hollywood Canteen and the block lettering "OF THE" looks like lettering on several Crossroads signs. Also, I saw a photograph, that I can't locate right now, that mentioned, as we know, the design of the place was supposed to be like a ship coming in to port and the various shops were to be selling goods from all over the world. It was indicated there were display maps showing where the various goods came from and it occurred to me that might be what they're standing in front of. I always marvel that someone on NLA can nearly always find a location with the bare minumum of details!


Quote:

Originally Posted by Martin Pal (Post 7450968)
The following photo was captioned: "Gene (left) with fellow crew member waiting for a show at
the Hollywood Canteen in 1943."

https://honortheveteransblog.files.w...014/12/003.jpg


BifRayRock May 25, 2016 8:14 PM









:previous: California Fireproof Storage at 2808 Pico. Building is still there being used for storage. Sidewalk clock is a nice touch.:)


http://i357.photobucket.com/albums/o...psvbxfezkc.jpgEbay







1929 - From intersection of Ardmore and Pico
http://i357.photobucket.com/albums/o...x.jpg~originalhttp://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/co...ll170/id/33332



1926 - Bank occupied part of first floor. (2800 W Pico)
http://i357.photobucket.com/albums/o...h.jpg~originalhttp://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/co...ll170/id/26743





2800 W Pico
http://i357.photobucket.com/albums/o...v.jpg~originalGoogleSV



Storage at 2800 W Pico
http://i357.photobucket.com/albums/o...k.jpg~originalGoogleSV


http://i357.photobucket.com/albums/o...q.jpg~original






Martin Pal May 25, 2016 8:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mdiederi (Post 7452521)
Searched the thread and couldn't find anything about this newspaper headline I stumbled upon on the internet. Anyone have other info?

http://images.rarenewspapers.com/eba...8/image051.jpg
rarenewspapers.com/

Here's the L.A. Times headline for this story:

http://blog.rarenewspapers.com/wp-co...ed-221x300.jpghttp://blog.rarenewspapers.com/?p=7337

This occurrence is known as either "The Battle of Los Angeles" or "The Great Los Angeles Air Raid."

Also, check out my post of last February here:

http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...ostcount=33878

Every year since 1991 the Fort MacArthur museum in San Pedro has had a recreation of this as a charity event for the museum. The post has info about Fort MacArthur and photos and videos of this event. I'd never heard of it until this year, so am going to try to go next Febraury, when it will be the 75th Anniversary!

From the post:

Quote:

Originally Posted by Martin Pal (Post 7349398)
What I also learned is that every year since 1991 they've had a fundraiser for the
grounds and museum. A poster for this year:

http://www.theairraid.com/2016-aIR-RAID-web-banner.Jpg


http://www.theairraid.com/AIR-RAID-P...RD-REVERSE.jpg


Martin Pal May 25, 2016 8:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BifRayRock (Post 7453199)

Imdb indicates the film "Hot for Paris" opened in Dec. 1929, but is thought to be a lost film, although Imdb has one user review posted, from a lady in Wales, which sounds like she has definitely seen it.

The film starred Victor McLaglen, Fifi D'Orsay, El Brendel and Polly Moran.

BifRayRock May 25, 2016 9:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Martin Pal (Post 7453263)
Imdb indicates the film "Hot for Paris" opened in Dec. 1929, but is thought to be a lost film, although Imdb has one user review posted, from a lady in Wales, which sounds like she has definitely seen it.

The film starred Victor McLaglen, Fifi D'Orsay, El Brendel and Polly Moran.





For being "misplaced" there is still quite a bit that is known about the film, which was released as a Silent and a Talkie, with a list of songs used in the sound track. http://www.elbrendel.com/2009/01/hot...aris-1929.html



A closer look at the same subject on NLA.


Quote:

Originally Posted by Chuckaluck (Post 6632175)
1929 - West Pico meets Ardmore. http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/cdm/co.../33332/rec/544


http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/utils/...0&DMY=0&DMTEXThttp://digitallibrary.usc.edu/utils/...2&DMY=0&DMTEXT
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/utils/...DMY=512&DMTEXThttp://digitallibrary.usc.edu/utils/...DMY=512&DMTEXT

http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/utils/...MY=1536&DMTEXThttp://digitallibrary.usc.edu/utils/...MY=1536&DMTEXT






Piggly meets Wiggly. (Awfully busy when the middle of the image is removed!)
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/utils/...MY=1536&DMTEXThttp://digitallibrary.usc.edu/utils/...MY=1536&DMTEXT


More complete version
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/utils/...MY=1536&DMTEXThttp://digitallibrary.usc.edu/utils/...MY=1536&DMTEXT

http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/utils/...4&DMY=0&DMTEXThttp://digitallibrary.usc.edu/utils/...6&DMY=0&DMTEXT
http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/utils/...DMY=512&DMTEXThttp://digitallibrary.usc.edu/utils/...DMY=512&DMTEXT






odinthor May 25, 2016 9:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tetsu (Post 7452344)
Ooh, very nice. Never seen the Ems' Victorian neighbor to the south other than the occasional turret poking up behind photos of the Ems herself. Anybody know anything about the house?

Can't seem to find anything on that house; but here's a bit of it and the Ems from another angle. Plus a bonus of Mr. Emswiler's obituary!

http://i1104.photobucket.com/albums/...pszsos1tgn.jpg

Beaudry May 25, 2016 11:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tetsu (Post 7452344)
Ooh, very nice. Never seen the Ems' Victorian neighbor to the south other than the occasional turret poking up behind photos of the Ems herself. Anybody know anything about the house?

I know, isn't it great? It's there in the 1888 Sanborn. From what I can tell, it was built by Howard W Mills, a real estate agent, as he's listed as at that address in the 1888 Voter Registry, and there in the 1893 Directory. The earliest mention of 327 in the papers is this, from 1895.

https://c7.staticflickr.com/8/7028/2...2833d30f_b.jpgLA Herald, Jan 11, 1895 newspapers.com

By about 1898 Mills sells the house to attorney Roscoe Edwin Hewitt (Mills moves to 438 S Grand—a large residence that disappears between the 1906 Sanborn and the 1910 Baist—and after 1910 Mills & Co are lodgers at the Fremont) and the 1900 Census shows Hewitt there with his wife, son and daughter, and four boarders. In September of 1908 the Hewitts sell the "old-time residence of nominal value" to "a retired furniture manufacturer of Clinton, Iowa" and presumably it becomes a full-on boarding house after that.

https://c7.staticflickr.com/8/7422/2...83bb0094_z.jpgLA Herald, Sept 12 1908, newspapers.com

At some point 327 is sold to the Ems, because in 1948, the demo permit says "Demolition of existing building and conversion of site to expand owner's parking lot on adjoining property on the South."

So let's talk a bit about this parking lot on the site of the former 327:

https://c7.staticflickr.com/8/7696/2...e7480fda_c.jpg
https://c3.staticflickr.com/8/7339/2...1d7ca04a_b.jpgmetmuseum

So, as you all know, there's an entire book devoted to Bunker Hill as it appears in film and fiction. Every so often another movie pops up, previously undiscovered! I've discovered one, in which a bit of it takes place right in said parking lot! It's called The Narcotic Story, and you can watch it on YouTube right here.

It's all worth watching, if you go for over-the-top period pictures about "hypes" who are "holding" and all that good stuff; at minutes 37:00 and 55:00 the side of the Ems is featured, and the big takedown of the pusher at 1:08 is something to behold. Then at the very end, as one of the ladies descends into prostitution to feed her junk habit, she propositions a john outside the May Hotel, at 209 S Olive. A cinematic masterpiece!

https://c6.staticflickr.com/8/7542/2...96180d95_c.jpg

https://c2.staticflickr.com/8/7408/2...71d7b873_c.jpg

https://c4.staticflickr.com/8/7199/2...833a6ba6_c.jpg

https://c4.staticflickr.com/8/7599/2...cb31c8bf_c.jpg

https://c5.staticflickr.com/8/7037/2...3342f018_c.jpg


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