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-   -   How Is Covid-19 Impacting Life in Your City? (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showthread.php?t=242036)

AviationGuy Apr 7, 2020 4:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pedestrian (Post 8886012)
I don’t have any sympathy for them. I bet they could go to work in 5 minutes helping out in the epidemic. NY and other states, including CA which has much less need, are seeking any licensed healthcare provider. If the folks in your family aren’t working it’s by choice. I might have made the same choice. The economic loss might be worth the physical safety to them. But lets not shed any tears.

Are you able to work as a paid M.D. or maybe a volunteer? I've missed a lot of your posts so I don't know if you've already mentioned. You seem like an ideal person for the job, but if you have limitations, I understand. BTW, I really appreciate your contributions to this thread. We need someone with the knowledge you have.

Pedestrian Apr 7, 2020 5:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AviationGuy (Post 8886635)
Are you able to work as a paid M.D. or maybe a volunteer? I've missed a lot of your posts so I don't know if you've already mentioned. You seem like an ideal person for the job, but if you have limitations, I understand. BTW, I really appreciate your contributions to this thread. We need someone with the knowledge you have.

First of all I switched from an active license to a retired license 8 years ago so they don’t want me (they only want people who retired 5 years ago or less). Second, I’m 74, somewhat overweight (not terribly now—I lost 70 pounds), have group A blood and a liver condition so I pretty much have all the risk factors for not doing well if I catch it. And I’m a coward. I admit it. I live alone with just my cat—I worry a lot about who’d care for the kitty if I wind up in the hospital (made worse by the discovery that cats can carry the virus). And finally, for now I’m kind of stuck in Arizona and neither that state nor CA really seems like they’re going to need me according to the U. Of Washington model.

chris08876 Apr 7, 2020 10:37 AM

FDNY, New Yorkers Clap for Workers at Mount Sinai Hospital during Coronavirus Pandemic 2020

Video Link

sopas ej Apr 7, 2020 1:20 PM

As a result of not going out...

From CBS2 Los Angeles:

LA Has The Cleanest Air In The World, Report Says

LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — With so many people staying at home and off the roads, Los Angeles currently has the cleanest air in the world, according to IQ Air’s live quality city ranking.

Following the issuing of the state-wide “Safe-At-Home” orders, many residents began working from home, lowering the number of commuters on the road.

On March 18, L.A.’s infamous rush-hour traffic was moving 71 percent faster than it usually does on a Wednesday afternoon, The New York Times reported.

According to the Environmental Protection Agency, last month L.A. experienced the longest consecutive “good” air days since at least 1980.

Experts say the improvement is also due to fewer planes flying and less ground activity in general.

Link: https://losangeles.cbslocal.com/2020...UIkLE.facebook


And this has to be cleanest air in the world for a big city, right? I would think Antarctica would have cleaner air...

montréaliste Apr 7, 2020 2:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sopas ej (Post 8886780)
As a result of not going out...

From CBS2 Los Angeles:

LA Has The Cleanest Air In The World, Report Says

LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — With so many people staying at home and off the roads, Los Angeles currently has the cleanest air in the world, according to IQ Air’s live quality city ranking.

Following the issuing of the state-wide “Safe-At-Home” orders, many residents began working from home, lowering the number of commuters on the road.

On March 18, L.A.’s infamous rush-hour traffic was moving 71 percent faster than it usually does on a Wednesday afternoon, The New York Times reported.

According to the Environmental Protection Agency, last month L.A. experienced the longest consecutive “good” air days since at least 1980.

Experts say the improvement is also due to fewer planes flying and less ground activity in general.

Link: https://losangeles.cbslocal.com/2020...UIkLE.facebook


And this has to be cleanest air in the world for a big city, right? I would think Antarctica would have cleaner air...


The traffic reports for the Trans-Antarctic freeway at the Penguin Canyon interchange are pretty horrendous this a.m.

hauntedheadnc Apr 7, 2020 2:18 PM

The most significant impact of coronavirus on my life right now is that last night I was cooking supper as I do almost every night now, and while cutting onions I sliced through my thumbnail and into my thumb. It hurt quite a bit to say the least, and caused me to need an hour or so to myself sitting quietly and absolutely fucking hating everyone and everything. Since then I've been treated to the curious phenomenon of being able to feel my heartbeat throbbing in my thumb.

1 star. Would not recommend.

chris08876 Apr 7, 2020 3:19 PM

Today's Cuomo Conference:

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...7121df210.jpeg

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...1f06afc1d.jpeg

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...12ccbdd77.jpeg

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...8a0edcac3.jpeg

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...b43cc6679.jpeg

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...ea123ee8c.jpeg

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...bd47e5d25.jpeg

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...c3b9f2546.jpeg

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...615945225.jpeg

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...f29241cb1.jpeg

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...77542f554.jpeg

chris08876 Apr 7, 2020 3:26 PM

^^^^^

I found the last point in reference to the 1918 Pandemic quite humbling. We have it good in hindsight. And keep in mind, that was just in 1... I repeat... 1 city or state. A six month peak would suck.

sopas ej Apr 7, 2020 3:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pedestrian (Post 8886672)
First of all I switched from an active license to a retired license 8 years ago so they don’t want me (they only want people who retired 5 years ago or less). Second, I’m 74, somewhat overweight (not terribly now—I lost 70 pounds), have group A blood and a liver condition so I pretty much have all the risk factors for not doing well if I catch it. And I’m a coward. I admit it. I live alone with just my cat—I worry a lot about who’d care for the kitty if I wind up in the hospital (made worse by the discovery that cats can carry the virus). And finally, for now I’m kind of stuck in Arizona and neither that state nor CA really seems like they’re going to need me according to the U. Of Washington model.

I forgot, Pedestrian, but where in AZ do you live again? Just curious. I haven't been to AZ in many years now... not since 2004 or '05.

sopas ej Apr 7, 2020 3:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hauntedheadnc (Post 8886820)
The most significant impact of coronavirus on my life right now is that last night I was cooking supper as I do almost every night now, and while cutting onions I sliced through my thumbnail and into my thumb. It hurt quite a bit to say the least, and caused me to need an hour or so to myself sitting quietly and absolutely fucking hating everyone and everything. Since then I've been treated to the curious phenomenon of being able to feel my heartbeat throbbing in my thumb.

1 star. Would not recommend.

Oh mah gah I feel your pain. When I was 17, at my very first job, I worked at a Burger King. During a lunch rush, while assembling and cutting a chicken sandwich, I sliced my thumb with a serrated knife, not through the nail but to the edge of the nail. It hurt so bad and there was a lot of blood. I still have the scar, but it's actually quite faint now.

sopas ej Apr 7, 2020 7:46 PM

From ABC7 Los Angeles:

Los Angeles coronavirus update: LA County confirms 15 additional deaths, 420 new cases including 12 among homeless population

Here are the current numbers of novel coronavirus cases across the Southland:

Los Angeles County: 6,360 confirmed cases, 147 deaths

Orange County: 882 cases, 14 deaths

Riverside County: 946 confirmed cases, 25 deaths

San Bernardino County: 530 cases, 16 deaths

Ventura County: 226 cases, 6 deaths

San Diego County: 1,404 cases, 19 deaths

12 p.m.

Gov. Gavin Newsom announced the latest coronavirus numbers for California, with 15,865 cases, 374 deaths, 2,611 hospitalized and 1,108 people in ICU.

The governor said thanks to efforts of Californians following the safer-at-home orders, the amount of cases has begun to gradually slow.

Newsom also provided information about ways to protect mental health as many residents hunker down indoors.

"Staying at home doesn't mean you're alone. We're here to do what we can to support you and be there at a time of need," Newsom said.

6 a.m.

This week, nine YMCA facilities across L.A. will open their doors to help the homeless during the pandemic. They're teaming up with the Board of Public Works to provide access to restrooms, showers, and locker rooms. More facilities may be opened later this week. Mayor Eric Garcetti also says the centers will create jobs for people who have been laid off.


Link: https://abc7.com/health/covid-19-upd...MAPs7Xwka28nLk

sopas ej Apr 7, 2020 7:50 PM

Meanwhile, in Spain...

From Business Insider:

Spain is moving to establish permanent basic income in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic

Link: https://www.businessinsider.com/spai...CiUdIz4fQNWzwg


And in the US...

From The Philadelphia Inquirer:

Grocery workers in U.S. are beginning to die of coronavirus

Link: https://www.inquirer.com/health/coro...NL41yuIZ4mtIFU

Crawford Apr 7, 2020 8:17 PM

California is really doing an outstanding job. I don't know if it's good fortune, good policy, or what, but a state that has all the risk factors just isn't showing much spread.

Pedestrian Apr 7, 2020 8:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sopas ej (Post 8886880)
I forgot, Pedestrian, but where in AZ do you live again? Just curious. I haven't been to AZ in many years now... not since 2004 or '05.

Green Valley (red blot way down south marks the spot):

https://uniim1.shutterfly.com/ng/ser...292052/enhance
https://www.google.com/search?q=Ariz...q8ifDkpvCiY0M:

But this is a second home. I still consider myself a San Franciscan and vote in SF.

Pedestrian Apr 7, 2020 9:37 PM

I love this:

Quote:

Communal Tins of Sourdough Starter Are Popping Up On Trees in San Francisco
Yes, there’s a Google map, too
by Eve Batey Apr 7, 2020, 12:15pm PDT

It’s no secret that everyone and their brother is suddenly into baking bread — one can’t open up Instagram without being confronted with a slew of loaf brags, many from folks whose accounts never before demonstrated an interest in the pursuit, all eager to show off their new skill. Now ABC 7 reports that San Franciscans are taking the social media concept of sharing offline, and are now sharing their sourdough starters by attaching them to power poles and trees.

For those who have somehow missed out on the baking-at-home boom (a trend so pervasive that Google searches for “bread” hit an all-time high), sourdough starter is a fermented mixture of flour and water that allows bread to rise. Here’s Eater’s Dayna Evans (whose “Everyone’s Making Sourdough Now — Here’s How to Get Started” is everything you need to jump on the breadwagon) on starter:

Guides in hand, the first thing that you’re going to need to make bread is a sourdough starter. A starter — also known as a levain, a mother, or a pre-ferment — is a lively mixture of flour and water combined with wild yeast and good bacteria captured from the air. It’s the ingredient that enables your sourdough bread to rise and what gives it its signature tangy flavor.

[But in a pinch credit must be given to] San Francisco’s dedication to quirk, as evidenced by signs posted to trees in spots across the Mission, Noe Valley, Bernal Heights, and Potrero Hill. “SOURDOUGH STARTER & (occasional) BAKED TREATS UP FOR GRABS!!” one sign reads. “Starter name: ‘Freddie, Son of Godric’ fed with all-purpose flour.” Also attached to the trees are jars or tins with the bacterial concoction inside, just there for the taking.

The effort to spread Freddie and his ilk has spawned a “Victory Dough” Google Map, that in its description says, “It all started with a neighbor’s Nextdoor.com post offering his hungry and active starter (named Godric) that he hung on a Bernal Heights telephone pole and inviting everyone into sourdough bread-making.” As of publication time, the map boasts 10 spots at which starter has been placed, and users can edit the map and add their own drop-off points.

https://uniim1.shutterfly.com/ng/ser...295414/enhance
https://sf.eater.com/2020/4/7/212124...an%20Francisco

Note: Freddie, Son of Godric may have been fed with all-purpose flour, but I have found that feeding my starter with whole wheat flour does wonders for it--much more yeasty bubbling activity.

jd3189 Apr 7, 2020 10:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sopas ej (Post 8886780)
As a result of not going out...

From CBS2 Los Angeles:

LA Has The Cleanest Air In The World, Report Says

LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — With so many people staying at home and off the roads, Los Angeles currently has the cleanest air in the world, according to IQ Air’s live quality city ranking.

Following the issuing of the state-wide “Safe-At-Home” orders, many residents began working from home, lowering the number of commuters on the road.

On March 18, L.A.’s infamous rush-hour traffic was moving 71 percent faster than it usually does on a Wednesday afternoon, The New York Times reported.

According to the Environmental Protection Agency, last month L.A. experienced the longest consecutive “good” air days since at least 1980.

Experts say the improvement is also due to fewer planes flying and less ground activity in general.

Link: https://losangeles.cbslocal.com/2020...UIkLE.facebook


And this has to be cleanest air in the world for a big city, right? I would think Antarctica would have cleaner air...


It’s been raining a lot too. For any of you native southern Californians, has it ever been this wet and green here before?

sopas ej Apr 7, 2020 10:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jd3189 (Post 8887336)
It’s been raining a lot too. For any of you native southern Californians, has it ever been this wet and green here before?

Yes it has. Especially during the El Niño years when we have a lot of rain. Two or three years ago, we also had a lot of rain during the winter, the one that took us out of the drought. That winter and spring, we had lots of greenery. And that was the spring of the superbloom, with pretty wildflowers everywhere.

sopas ej Apr 7, 2020 10:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pedestrian (Post 8887227)
Green Valley (red blot way down south marks the spot):

https://uniim1.shutterfly.com/ng/ser...292052/enhance
https://www.google.com/search?q=Ariz...q8ifDkpvCiY0M:

But this is a second home. I still consider myself a San Franciscan and vote in SF.

Ah OK. So you're not far from Tucson, a city I've never been to before.

Last year, my partner and I thought to explore Tucson (he's never been there before either). We thought to go because we heard that it's a much more interesting city than Phoenix, and it's also the first city in the US to be named a UNESCO City of Gastronomy. We being into all kinds of cuisines, we wanted to check it out, but we never ended up going.

Pedestrian Apr 7, 2020 10:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sopas ej (Post 8887348)
Ah OK. So you're not far from Tucson, a city I've never been to before.

Last year, my partner and I thought to explore Tucson (he's never been there before either). We thought to go because we heard that it's a much more interesting city than Phoenix, and it's also the first city in the US to be named a UNESCO City of Gastronomy. We being into all kinds of cuisines, we wanted to check it out, but we never ended up going.

Seems to me it's a city of one cuisine--Sonoran--which is maybe not the high point of Mexican food (I think there's more variety of Mexican in San Francisco because there there are people from all over Mexico and Central America; here it's just Sonora, next door). There are Indian, Thai and some other restaurants but nothing like the Bay Area. And lots of strip malls.

Basically Tucson is a large college town, dominated by the U. of Arizona. But the food, aside from Sonoran, tends to chain fast food and strip mall stuff.

Since I'm only 40 miles from the border, I used to go to Mexico for lunch. The border's closed now, though and the drug violence scared off enough business that my favorite restaurant found a way to move north of the border to a little art enclave called Tubac about halfway between me and the border. Very historical place actually--it's where the first Spanish expedition to reach and explore the Bay Area started.

Quote:

Established in 1752 as a Spanish presidio, the first Spanish colonial garrison in what is now Arizona, Tubac was one of the stops on the Camino Real (the "Royal Road") from Mexico to the Spanish settlements in California.

Tubac's most famous Spanish resident was Juan Bautista de Anza. While stationed at Tubac (1760–1776), de Anza built the chapel of Santa Gertrudis, the foundations of which lie beneath today's St. Ann's Church.

Apaches attacked the town repeatedly in the 1840s, forcing the Sonoran Mexicans to abandon both Tumacacori and Tubac.

Tubac was the scene of a four-day siege in 1861, between Tubac's male population, Confederate militia and Apache warriors.

In the 1930s - 1960s Tubac became an art colony. . . . .
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tubac,_Arizona

Quote:

The Spanish began colonizing Alta California with the Portolá expedition of 1769–1770. The two-pronged Portolá effort involved both a long sea voyage against prevailing winds and the California Current, and a difficult land route from Baja California. Colonies were established at San Diego and Monterey, with a presidio and Franciscan mission at each location. A more direct land route and further colonization were desired, especially at present-day San Francisco, which Portolá saw but was not able to colonize. By the time of Juan Bautista de Anza's expedition, three more missions had been established, including Mission San Antonio de Padua in the Salinas Valley.

In 1772, Anza proposed an expedition to Alta California to the Viceroy of New Spain. This was approved by the King of Spain and on January 8, 1774, with 3 padres, 20 soldiers, 11 servants, 35 mules, 65 cattle, and 140 horses, Anza set forth from Tubac Presidio, south of present-day Tucson, Arizona. Anza heard of a California Native American called Sebastian Tarabal who had fled from Mission San Gabriel to Sonora, and took him as guide. The expedition took a southern route along the Rio Altar (Sonora y Sinaloa, New Spain), then paralleled the modern Mexico/California border, crossing the Colorado River at its confluence with the Gila River. This was in the domain of the Yuma tribe, with which he established good relations.

Anza reached Mission San Gabriel Arcángel, near the California coast, on March 22, 1774, and Monterey, California, Alta California's capital, on April 19. He returned to Tubac by late May, 1774. This expedition was closely watched by Viceroy and King, and on October 2, 1774, Anza was promoted to the rank of lieutenant-colonel, and ordered to lead a group of colonists to Alta California. The Spanish were desirous of reinforcing their presence in Alta California as a buffer against Russian colonization of the Americas advancing from the north, and possibly establish a harbor that would give shelter to Spanish ships. The expedition got under way on October 23, 1775, and arrived at Mission San Gabriel Arcángel in January, 1776, the colonists having suffered greatly from the winter weather en route. Today this route is marked as the Juan Bautista de Anza National Historic Trail.

The expedition continued on to Monterey with the colonists. Having fulfilled his mission from the Viceroy, he continued on with Father Pedro Font and a party of twelve others exploring north and found an inland route to the San Francisco Bay described by Portolà. In Anza's diary on March 25, 1776, he states that he "arrived at the arroyo of San Joseph Cupertino (now Stevens Creek), which is useful only for travelers. Here we halted for the night, having come eight leagues in seven and a half hours. From this place we have seen at our right the estuary which runs from the port of San Francisco." Pressing on, Anza located the sites for the Presidio of San Francisco and Mission San Francisco de Asis in present-day San Francisco, California on March 28, 1776. He did not establish the settlement; it was established later by José Joaquín Moraga. While returning to Monterey, he located the original sites for Mission Santa Clara de Asis and the town of San José de Guadalupe (modern day San Jose, California), but again did not establish either settlement.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Juan_Bautista_de_Anza

Yuri Apr 7, 2020 11:23 PM

I just came across with this on the Worldometer:

An estimated additional 180 - 195 deaths per day occurring at home in New York City due to COVID-19 are not being counted in the official figures. "Early on in this crisis we were able to swab people who died at home, and thus got a coronavirus reading. But those days are long gone. We simply don't have the testing capacity for the large numbers dying at home. Now only those few who had a test confirmation *before* dying are marked as victims of coronavirus on their death certificate. This almost certainly means we are undercounting the total number of victims of this pandemic," said Mark Levine, Chair of New York City Council health committee

That's terrible. Are there more info on it?


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