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-   -   How Is Covid-19 Impacting Life in Your City? (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showthread.php?t=242036)

iheartthed Mar 10, 2021 3:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sopas ej (Post 9212543)
My partner has a few co-workers who also had it, and he also has a co-worker whose son's fiance's brother died from it.

Was this story in the media? It sounds familiar.

SteveD Mar 10, 2021 3:24 PM

Wow. some of these comments. I live near downtown Atlanta. I've lost count of the number of people I know who have had COVID...hundreds? easily. Deaths, an Uncle. And then at least 20 or more in the "friend of a friend" category.

mrnyc Mar 10, 2021 3:32 PM

imo as for schools -- even with random testing at schools, no teachers should go back to in person unless they have had both their shots and its been two weeks or whatever since then.

those on remote because of other health issues should stay on the remote the rest of this school year at least. that hardly matters because remote teachers continue be needed anyway for parents who do not want to send their kids back to in person.

we'll see about september and next school year later. it's definitely still a logistical nightmare.

badrunner Mar 10, 2021 3:44 PM

Covid has killed about 1 in 600 Americans, so by now everyone knows someone who has died from it, especially if you live in one of the hard hit areas. I personally don't know anyone in my immediate circle who has died from it, but in my extended circle of acquaintances, there are a few.

10023 Mar 10, 2021 3:57 PM

I only know of one person who has died from it (the father of a colleague in their mid 80s). Many people I know have had it, including colleagues, family and friends.

Steely Dan Mar 10, 2021 4:10 PM

i've lost count of how many people i've heard of who've either had or died from covid, but i directly know two people here in chicago (ie. people i actually know and not "my brother-in-law's co-worker's grandmother in cleveland") who've died of covid - my wife's aunt (early 70s) and one of my parent's closest friends (mid 80s).

IluvATX Mar 10, 2021 4:36 PM

All Alaskans age 16+ are now eligible for vaccine.

iheartthed Mar 10, 2021 4:40 PM

February residential sales activity in Manhattan is the most since 2015 :

Quote:

Manhattan apartment discounts may be ending soon as sales soar 73% in February
  • Sales contracts in Manhattan for residential real estate soared by 73% in February, and brokers say the days of big price cuts and deals in the city may be ending.
  • There were more than 1,110 sales contracts signed in February, marking the third straight month of year-over-year gains, according to a report from Douglas Elliman and Miller Samuel.
  • “The bigger narrative is the inbound migration to Manhattan,” said Jonathan Miller, CEO of Miller Samuel. “I think the youth renaissance we are going to see in Manhattan is a big part of the story.”

https://www.cnbc.com/2021/03/04/manh...73percent.html

muertecaza Mar 10, 2021 4:57 PM

I don't think I know anyone personally that has died--closest are one step removed, like a good friend's aunt, who I believe was in her 50s but in poor health. I've known a lot of friends/acquaintances/coworkers that have tested positive with various levels of symptoms. The one that really shook me up was a close coworker (early 60s, diabetic, but very vital and energetic) that was hospitalized for a month and was apparently on the cusp of being put on a ventilator before he began to recover.

Pedestrian Mar 10, 2021 5:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by badrunner (Post 9213001)
Covid has killed about 1 in 600 Americans, so by now everyone knows someone who has died from it, especially if you live in one of the hard hit areas. I personally don't know anyone in my immediate circle who has died from it, but in my extended circle of acquaintances, there are a few.

I don't. Like I said, I know a couple of people in their 40s and teens who have had it but no one who has died.

I wonder if the difference between my experience in San Francisco, which has strict business closures and a very low rate of infection (5.1/100,000) and a place like Atlanta which has been pretty laissez faire and has a higher infection rate (approx 25/100,000) isn't explained by the governmental approach.

SlidellWx Mar 10, 2021 6:58 PM

I don't know anyone personally who has died of it. Several extended family members and a few of my coworkers have had COVID, but none experienced severe symptoms or were hospitalized.

homebucket Mar 10, 2021 7:31 PM

I've known several friends that have had it and been relatively fine. Mostly flu like symptoms, some loss of taste/smell briefly (a week at most), but no long term complications. A few of my friends parents and grandparents have had COVID though and have passed away. Some with lengthy ICU stays. Very small sample size of course, but it does seem in line with the statistics that the elderly are overwhelmingly more severely affected.

Pedestrian Mar 10, 2021 8:05 PM

Quote:

COVID hospitalizations in the Bay Area and California down dramatically from winter surge
Kellie Hwang
March 10, 2021
Updated: March 10, 2021 11:46 a.m.

Just a couple of months ago, hospitals across California were overwhelmed with coronavirus patients.

But the situation has changed dramatically: Hospitalizations have plummeted throughout California and the Bay Area since the height of the winter surge.

Statewide, 3,744 confirmed COVID patients were in hospitals on Monday, including 1,028 in the ICU. That’s an 83% decrease from the peak of 21,597 hospitalizations on Jan. 4, and a 79% decrease from 4,868 ICU patients on Jan. 10 [CA has 39.4 million people].

In the Bay Area, hospitals counted 500 COVID patients on Monday, with 146 in the ICU. That’s down 77% from the winter peak of 2,210 hospitalizations on Jan. 7 and down 73% from the 539 ICU patients on Jan. 8.

Those are the lowest numbers since mid-November, and heading back toward all-time pandemic lows of 1,306 hospitalizations and 544 ICU patients statewide on March 29, and in the Bay Area, 220 hospitalizations on June 18 and 55 ICU patients on Oct. 24 . . . .

https://s.hdnux.com/photos/01/17/03/...5/rawImage.jpg
https://www.sfchronicle.com/local/ar...d-16015376.php

jtown,man Mar 11, 2021 2:03 AM

Chicago is buzzing with life these last few days!


And the drivers are appearing to be getting extremely aggressive because they aren't used to this amount of traffic anymore?

mrnyc Mar 11, 2021 2:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jtown,man (Post 9214439)
Chicago is buzzing with life these last few days!


And the drivers are appearing to be getting extremely aggressive because they aren't used to this amount of traffic anymore?

i was just thinking about this as its the same here in ny. i saw tons of cars again and honking tunnel traffic after work today, just like the old normal. i think the good weather turn is playing a part, as is the firmer handle on steady vaccinations.

SlidellWx Mar 11, 2021 5:16 AM

Live music starts up again in New Orleans this Friday! 75 person limit in the music clubs, and patrons must remain seated during the performance, but it's live music! The soul of the city is starting to come back to life slowly but surely.

Pedestrian Mar 11, 2021 8:22 PM

Quote:

‘Finally, slowly, starting to run out’
By David Leonhardt'
March 11, 2021

Public discussion of “herd immunity” often treats it like an on-off switch: When the U.S. reaches herd immunity, the crisis will be over; until then, the country has little immunity from Covid-19.

But that’s not right.

Herd immunity is more like a light dimmer. The more people develop immunity — either from having been infected or from being vaccinated — the less easily the virus will spread.

Nearly 30 percent of Americans have now had the virus, according to Youyang Gu, a data scientist. (That includes many people who have never taken a Covid test.) About 18 percent have received at least one vaccine shot. There is some overlap between these two groups, which means that about 40 percent of Americans now have some protection from Covid.

Had these people been exposed to the virus a year ago, they could have become infected — and then spread Covid to others. Today, many are protected.

“This level of population immunity slows down transmission,” Caitlin Rivers, an epidemiologist at Johns Hopkins University, wrote in The Washington Post. “After millions of infections and the start of a vaccination campaign, the virus is finally, slowly, starting to run out of new people to infect.”
nytdirect@nytimes.com

mrnyc Mar 11, 2021 9:47 PM

oh my rocky concert poll results:


NYC SHOWLIST EMAIL NEWSLETTER
March 11, 2021
*SUPPORT OMR*

Last week, along with the news that music venues could reopen at reduced capacity in April, we asked you "Would You Go To A Show In April?" Almost 1,000 of you super chill show-goers responded to the email survey. We promised we'd publish the results this week and Oh My Rockness is a blob of its word. Ready?

35% of you responded "Yes, inside or outside."
34% of you responded "Yes, but only if outside."
31% of you responded "No, I would not go."

Our newsletter subscribers (you) are much more likely to go to a show next month than the respondents to our Twitter poll - you can see how the responses compare here.

So there you have it. Thanks for participating, everybody. Please love looking at the rest of this week's newsletter now. Also, it's been 364 days since the shows went away.

10023 Mar 11, 2021 10:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pedestrian (Post 9215155)

I feel more and more vindicated in my views from last year. After a couple of months’ lockdown (when we really didn’t understand under enough about this virus or have testing), by summer things should have been open and stayed open.

But when they did, the guidance should have remained for the elderly, the very obese or those with certain risk factors to continue to avoid indoor dining, crowds, and close contact with anyone who was not limiting social contact. Maybe you are right that you can’t legally make separate rules, but the messaging should have been very strong - if you’re over 70, don’t do these things; if you’re clinically obese, don’t do these things; if you have have heart disease, don’t do these things.

And that includes bringing multiple generations of family together at home, which Brits were basically encouraged to do and was the most risky and stupid thing possible. No amount of masked gym-going or indoor dining spread Covid as quickly as people taking the bloody kids to see grandma and grandpa at Christmas.

We could have gotten to 40% of the population being exposed, with very few deaths, really quickly if older people had stayed home and away from younger people and younger people mingled freely last summer.

Pedestrian Mar 12, 2021 2:06 AM

Quote:

Blackstone to expand headquarters at 345 Park Avenue
BY Reuters
— 7:54 PM ET 03/11/2021

(Reuters) - Blackstone Group Inc ( BX) has signed a deal to expand its presence at its Park Avenue, Manhattan headquarters, the asset manager's landlord the Rudin family said on Thursday.

345 Park Avenue, the building where Blackstone's current headquarters is housed, has been the company's home for more than 30 years.

Blackstone will lease an additional 80,000 square feet of office space, bringing its total property to about 720,000 square feet. It also extended all its leases in the building for an additional year until 2028.
https://eresearch.fidelity.com/erese...2B337K-OUSBS_1

So I guess not everybody will be working from home in the new post-COVID world.

sopas ej Mar 12, 2021 2:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by iheartthed (Post 9212961)
Was this story in the media? It sounds familiar.

Not that I know of... but I don't doubt that many people have had the same type of situation.

sopas ej Mar 12, 2021 2:16 AM

From the LA Times:

Why L.A. and Orange counties will reopen faster than Ventura, Riverside, San Diego counties


By LUKE MONEY, RONG-GONG LIN II, PAUL SISSON
MARCH 10, 2021 10:26 AM PT

Southern California is poised to reopen a wider swath of its economy in a matter of days. But, as often has been the case throughout the COVID-19 pandemic, the pace will be uneven — with some counties moving forward more quickly than others.

In the long run, that probably won’t be a major issue, particularly if newly confirmed infections continue to fall and more Californians are vaccinated. But the near term could see a patchwork where three of the state’s large urban counties — Los Angeles, Orange and San Bernardino — are able to begin a wider reopening before neighboring Ventura, Riverside and San Diego counties.

The first phase

According to state data released Tuesday, Los Angeles, Orange and San Bernardino counties recorded coronavirus case rates low enough to position them to escape the strictest, or purple, tier of California’s four-tier reopening roadmap.

The timing of when they can officially progress to the less restrictive red category, however, hinges on how quickly providers give vaccines to those living in California’s most disadvantaged areas.

In a bid to address inequities in vaccine administration, California is now devoting 40% of its available supplies to residents in targeted communities — those in the lowest quartile of a socioeconomic measurement tool called the California Healthy Places index.

Once 2 million doses have been dispensed in those areas, the state will relax the criteria for counties to move from the purple to the red tier.

As it stands now, counties must have an adjusted rate at or below 7.0 new coronavirus cases per day per 100,000 people to move into the red tier. When the state hits its 2-million dose goal, counties with a case rate of up to 10 new cases per day per 100,000 people would become eligible to move forward.

California is about 73,000 doses short of 2 million, according to the latest available state data, meaning that goal is already within striking distance.

The state consistently receives more than 1 million total vaccine doses per week. And officials are hopeful supplies will continue to gradually increase as shipments of vaccines manufactured by Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna increase and the single-dose Johnson & Johnson vaccine arrives.

Under the existing reopening framework, L.A., Orange and San Bernardino counties would not be in position to advance from the purple tier this week. However, since all three have logged adjusted case rates of fewer than 10 new coronavirus cases per day per 100,000 people for the last two weeks, it appears they will be allowed to progress to the less restrictive category soon after the state clears its vaccination hurdle.

The latest state-released average coronavirus case rates, which are adjusted based on the number of tests performed in a particular county, were 5.2 in L.A., 6.0 in Orange County and 6.7 in San Bernardino.

Next steps

After the goal of 2-million doses is reached in low-income communities, the California Department of Public Health will move quickly on county tier reassignments. They’ll “be announced the next day and will then be effective the day following that announcement,” the agency said in an email Monday.

“Our understanding is that, within 48 hours of the state announcing the vaccine trigger has been met, L.A. County, along with other counties with qualifying case rates, would move into the red tier,” L.A. County Public Health Director Barbara Ferrer said Tuesday.

So by the time the state publishes its routine tier report next Tuesday — the day of the week tier assignments have typically been announced — the new, relaxed red-tier threshold should already be in place, enabling L.A., Orange, San Bernardino and some other counties to further reopen their economies.

Riverside, San Diego, Santa Barbara and Ventura counties, however, would need at least another week to move into the red tier. The latest state-tabulated adjusted case rates were 8.3 for Riverside County, 8.8 for San Diego County, 9.7 for Santa Barbara County and 9.1 for Ventura County. Two consecutive weeks of case rates below 10 are required to exit the purple tier.

What being in the red means

Counties in the red tier can allow indoor restaurant dining and movie theaters to reopen at 25% capacity or up to 100 people, whichever is less. In-person classes also would be allowed to resume for students in grades seven through 12.

Indoor gyms and dance and yoga studios can open at 10% capacity. Museums, zoos and aquariums can open indoor activities at 25% capacity, and nonessential stores and libraries can open at 50% capacity, up from 25%.

State officials also announced last week that amusement parks would be eligible to reopen, with restrictions, in red-tier counties starting April 1 — meaning long-closed attractions such as Disneyland, Universal Studios, Knott’s Berry Farm and Six Flags Magic Mountain in Southern California could be mere weeks away from once again welcoming visitors.

Capacity will be limited to 15% for parks in counties that are in the red tier, with the cap rising to 25% once a county progresses to orange, and 35% upon reaching the most lenient tier, yellow. Attendance will be limited to in-state visitors.

The state’s rules serve only as a benchmark, though. Counties have the power to impose additional restrictions — meaning it’s not a given that a region will immediately reopen fully after it meets state requirements.


Link: https://www.latimes.com/california/s...AdUT6-cHhSgesM

Pedestrian Mar 12, 2021 2:43 AM

^^Most of the Bay Area (maybe all now) is already red.

iheartthed Mar 12, 2021 4:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sopas ej (Post 9215525)
Not that I know of... but I don't doubt that many people have had the same type of situation.

Yeah. The story sounded familiar because it was similar to Dr. Fauci's:

Quote:

Fauci says daughter ‘saddened greatly’ by death of boyfriend’s brother, 32, from virus

He warned that while COVID-19 typically is non-fatal for young, healthy folk, it’s unpredictable, leading to long-term issues.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, who has been one of America’s most trusted medical leaders during the coronavirus pandemic, recently confirmed that the virus has impacted his own family.

The nation’s leading disease expert said the brother of his youngest daughter’s boyfriend died from COVID-19 at only 32, despite being previously healthy.

https://news.yahoo.com/fauci-says-da...161951125.html

Pedestrian Mar 12, 2021 6:09 PM

Most people over here don’t seem aware of what’s going on in Europe:

Quote:

EU Confronts a Covid-19 Rebound as Vaccine Hopes Recede
By Marcus Walker in Rome, Bertrand Benoit in Berlin and Stacy Meichtry in Paris
Updated March 12, 2021 11:08 am ET

The European Union’s fight against Covid-19 is stuck in midwinter, even as spring and vaccinations spur hope of improvement in the U.S. and U.K.

Contagion is rising again in much of the EU, despite months of restrictions on daily life, as more-virulent virus strains outpace vaccinations. A mood of gloom and frustration is settling on the continent, and governments are caught between their promises of progress and the bleak epidemiological reality.

Virus infections and deaths have been falling rapidly in the U.S. and U.K. since January as inoculations take off among the elderly and other vulnerable groups. In the EU, however, new Covid-19 cases have been rising again since mid-February. U.S. infections and deaths, which were higher on a per-capita basis for most of 2020, have fallen below the bloc’s.

In much of the continent, the spread of the more-aggressive variant first detected in the U.K. is behind the worsening of the pandemic, undoing strenuous efforts to rein in the virus since the fall with an array of restrictions that have brought the bloc’s economic recovery to a standstill.

Governments and public-health experts say only a combination of accelerated vaccinations and gradual reopening can defeat Covid-19’s latest rebound. But the EU’s efforts continue to suffer from its slowness in procuring and approving vaccines, production delays at vaccine makers, and bureaucratic holdups in injecting available doses . . . .
https://www.wsj.com/articles/europe-...d=hp_lead_pos6

Their vaccine policy does seem curious. They have been slow to approve all the vaccines and I don’t believe have yet approved Moderna’s (could be wrong about that). And they are also slow to use one of the earliest they did approve, that of Astrazeneca, saying they don’t think it works well for older people and generally disparaging it. Part of the delay seems to have been that Pfizer cut production at its Belgian plant while trying to expand the plant’s capacity and soon the larger capacity should come online. But even so, vaccine hesitancy seems to be rising in Europe due to the bureaucratic stumbles while it’s falling in the US and UK due to government enthusiasm for getting everyone vaccinated.

JManc Mar 12, 2021 6:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SlidellWx (Post 9214581)
Live music starts up again in New Orleans this Friday! 75 person limit in the music clubs, and patrons must remain seated during the performance, but it's live music! The soul of the city is starting to come back to life slowly but surely.

My wife and I are looking forward to going back to New Orleans and this is encouraging.

Pedestrian Mar 12, 2021 6:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JManc (Post 9216087)
My wife and I are looking forward to going back to New Orleans and this is encouraging.

What with “to go cups”, you can party outside in the streets and usually the weather’s warm enough for outdoor dining too (until it gets too warm), if hopefully they’ve adopted “parklets” from NY and SF.

jtown,man Mar 13, 2021 2:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pedestrian (Post 9216044)
Most people over here don’t seem aware of what’s going on in Europe:


https://www.wsj.com/articles/europe-...d=hp_lead_pos6

Their vaccine policy does seem curious. They have been slow to approve all the vaccines and I don’t believe have yet approved Moderna’s (could be wrong about that). And they are also slow to use one of the earliest they did approve, that of Astrazeneca, saying they don’t think it works well for older people and generally disparaging it. Part of the delay seems to have been that Pfizer cut production at its Belgian plant while trying to expand the plant’s capacity and soon the larger capacity should come online. But even so, vaccine hesitancy seems to be rising in Europe due to the bureaucratic stumbles while it’s falling in the US and UK due to government enthusiasm for getting everyone vaccinated.

It seems the fear may be overblown.

I looked at the numbers for France and Germany, both are slowly rising in cases over the last few days but deaths have gone down. As long as they have been vaccinating the elderly I see no reason why this should blow up into some reason to shut things down again.

the urban politician Mar 13, 2021 2:44 AM

Hospitalizations and death are what matter.

Pedestrian Mar 13, 2021 5:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jtown,man (Post 9216514)
It seems the fear may be overblown.

I looked at the numbers for France and Germany, both are slowly rising in cases over the last few days but deaths have gone down. As long as they have been vaccinating the elderly I see no reason why this should blow up into some reason to shut things down again.

Tell it to the Italians. Maybe they need your insight.

Quote:

Italy Locks Down Much of the Country’s North Over the Coronavirus
By Jason Horowitz
Published March 7, 2020
Updated March 11, 2020

ROME — Italy’s government early Sunday took the extraordinary step of locking down much of the country’s north, restricting movement for about a quarter of the Italian population in regions that serve as the country’s economic engine.

The move represents the most sweeping effort outside China to stop the spread of the coronavirus, and is tantamount to sacrificing the Italian economy in the short term to save it from the ravages of the virus in the long term.

By taking such tough measures, Italy, which is suffering the worst outbreak in Europe, sent a signal that restrictive clampdowns at odds with some of the core values of Western democracies may be necessary to contain and defeat the virus . . . .
Www.nytimes.com

Or perhaps you need to look east:

Quote:

COVID-19: Slovakia mired in chaos
March 1, 2021

For almost a year, Slovakia has been ruled by a coalition that pledged to clean up the "mafia state." Its chaotic strategies during the coronavirus pandemic, however, have pushed the country into a healthcare emergency.

Despite employing widespread testing, Slovakia is losing the fight against the coronavirus pandemic as infection rates climb

The coalition wanted to clean up the "mafia state," to be a government for the people, to create justice and transparency. Just shy of a year ago, a coalition headed by Igor Matovic, an anti-corruption and political activist, came to power in Slovakia. It faced quite a challenge — dismantling former Prime Minister Robert Fico's corrupt, mafia-style system with its close ties between politics and organized crime. The coalition also took office in the middle of the first coronavirus lockdown.

The government's record is largely disappointing. As far as the coronavirus crisis is concerned, it has been downright disastrous: Slovakia is currently experiencing one of the worst health emergencies in Europe, largely due to the Matovic government's chaotic management. The country currently tops the list of European virus deaths per million inhabitants and patients hospitalized with COVID-19 in a 14-day period. In terms of infection rates, Slovakia at the moment ranks third in Europe after the Czech Republic and Estonia, according to official EU statistics.
https://www.dw.com/en/covid-19-slova...aos/a-56740390

Italy, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Estonia . . . . It’s not about Germany and France.

Pedestrian Mar 14, 2021 1:50 AM

IMHO the vaccination news in the US is very good--we are now giving 2.5 million shots per day.

https://uniim1.shutterfly.com/ng/ser...686729/enhance

https://uniim1.shutterfly.com/ng/ser...686734/enhance
https://www.bloomberg.com/graphics/c...-distribution/

Again, these percentages are of the total population. Multiply by 1.3 in the US to get percentage of those over 18.

Pedestrian Mar 14, 2021 8:20 PM

Quote:

Covid-19 Separates Two Towns: Maine Is Homesick for Canada
By Jon Kamp | Photographs by Ashley L. Conti for The Wall Street Journal
March 14, 2021 6:30 am ET

Residents living near the river dividing Madawaska, Maine, from Canada say the international border has long been more concept than barrier. People crossed the 100-year-old bridge to Edmundston, New Brunswick, easily each day to shop, visit family and head to work.

But a year after Covid-19 caused tight travel restrictions, the border remains a major impediment to these remote, interwoven communities and many others like them. Canadians are no longer streaming into Maine for cheaper American goods like gasoline and milk. And families that straddle the border have been cut off . . . .

Madawaska, population about 3,700, sits atop Maine along the Saint John River. The nearest of Maine’s larger cities, Bangor, is 200 miles south. Under normal times, residents can walk into Edmundston, home to about 16,000.

These communities are tied so closely they share a paper plant, with a mill on the Canadian side that pipes pulp to Madawaska to make products like burger wrappers and pharmaceutical inserts. They also share an Acadian heritage, typically celebrated with summer festivals. Cross-border marriages are common . . . .

The U.S. significantly restricted border entries on March 21, 2020, when the Covid-19 crisis was ramping up. Commercial traffic and essential workers still cross, but more casual visits—the trips for dairy products or to visit an elderly parent—have been largely restricted. The U.S. limits are currently set to expire later this month, but have been steadily extended through the pandemic.

About 3.3 million people poured through borders into Maine by car, bus, train or on foot 2019, federal data show. But the number plunged 79% to about 700,000 last year, and Canadian border data also show significant drops in incoming travel. Maine’s Office of Tourism estimates Canadian visitation tumbled by about 80% on the year, costing the state about $1 billion.

There is a small border station on the Madawaska side of the bridge where visitors stop to check in. That hasn’t changed, but restrictions have . . . .

The closures have caused personal strain, keeping loved ones far apart even if they only live a short drive away, said Eric Marquis, Edmundston’s deputy mayor. “All of these things are starting to take their toll,” he said . . . .
https://www.wsj.com/articles/covid-1...5714201?page=1

Doady Mar 14, 2021 8:57 PM

A COVID outbreak at an Amazon warehouse along a busy bus route in Brampton, and another in a condo in Mississauga, all while prices while the prices of single-family homes are skyrocketing and condo prices are dropping in the Toronto area. Even suburbs like Brampton and Mississauga are showing that higher densities and transit may not be such good things after all, and more and more people here are realizing that.

For those not from Toronto who may not know, Brampton is a suburb of 600,000 with not even one public east-west freeway, leading to overcrowded east-west bus routes such as Steeles Ave. Mississauga is a suburb of 700,000 with over 300 high-rise buildings (according the SSP database) and an LRT line with no connection to Toronto being constructed. Over time, people will not look kindly at all these efforts to increase transit ridership and density, and the lack of investment in roads in favour of transit - heavy-handed but futile efforts to promote "urban living" that did little but put them at higher risk of infection.


Brampton suspending bus route, testing drivers after 9 COVID-19 cases linked to Amazon warehouse outbreak
Quote:

TORONTO -- Brampton Mayor Patrick Brown says a transit route will be temporarily suspended with a large number of bus drivers undergoing COVID-19 testing following a major outbreak at a "large logistics business" in the city.

A source tells CP24 the outbreak occurred at Amazon Fulfillment Centre YYZ3, located at the corner of Steeles Avenue West and Winston Churchill Boulevard.
https://toronto.ctvnews.ca/brampton-...reak-1.5339566


Variant outbreak at condo may be linked to common areas: Peel's top doc
Five separate cases of the variant B.1.351 variant were confirmed in one central Mississauga condo building, and the remaining residents were being tested Monday
Quote:

Apartment and condo residents are reminded to follow public health precautions while in common areas of their buildings after an outbreak of the highly-contagious South African variant in Mississauga, Peel Region Medical Officer of Health Dr. Lawrence Loh says.

Five separate cases of the variant B.1.351 variant were confirmed in one central Mississauga condo building — located at 385 Prince of Wales Dr. — and the remaining residents were being tested Monday.
https://torontosun.com/news/provinci...-peels-top-doc


Single-family home sales and prices way up in Toronto while condo sales remain tough
Quote:

...

Prices, too, continue to skyrocket, up to an average of an unaffordable $955,615 — 13.3 per cent more expensive year-over-year.

All of this is thanks to the sales of single-family homes, which have hit record highs lately, with semi-detached houses in particular driving the sales increase (numbers were up a 33.9 per cent from last year) and detached houses driving the price increase (prices were up 15.2 per cent overall from last year).

The condo market, on the other hand, has been cooling for a few months now, with sales in November up only marginally — less than one per cent in the GTA overall — and prices actually down year-over-year, largely due to a flooded market that saw nearly double the number of listings this November than last.
https://www.blogto.com/real-estate-t...sales-toronto/

Pedestrian Mar 14, 2021 9:29 PM

Quote:

South Africa’s Drop in Covid-19 Cases Adds to Questions About Waves of Infections
By Gabriele Steinhauser
March 14, 2021 11:00 am ET

JOHANNESBURG—Earlier this year, doctors and epidemiologists in South Africa’s economic capital were bracing for the worst. A new coronavirus strain was surging across the country, thousands of holidaymakers were due to return from Covid-19 hot spots, and one in three coronavirus tests was coming back positive.

Then something unexpected happened: Covid-19 cases started dropping.

Since mid-January, confirmed Covid-19 infections in South Africa have fallen from a record of nearly 22,000 a day to around 1,000, without a large-scale vaccination campaign or stringent lockdown. Fewer than 5% of Covid-19 tests are finding traces of the virus, a sign that health agencies are missing fewer cases. The government has lifted most of its remaining virus restrictions for the country of 60 million people.

The cause of this steep decline in cases remains somewhat of a mystery. As in other countries that have at some point experienced surprising drops in Covid-19 cases—such as India, Pakistan and some parts of Brazil—epidemiologists and virologists are piecing together different explanations for why the outbreak in South Africa isn’t following patterns set elsewhere.

Those range from important population groups reaching sufficient levels of immunity to slow down transmission, to people sticking more closely to social-distancing rules, such as wearing masks and voluntarily reducing contacts, when deaths were mounting before the decline . . . .
https://www.wsj.com/articles/south-a...ns-11615734003

jtown,man Mar 14, 2021 11:05 PM

Cases rising are going to mean less and less over the next month or so.

The most vulnerable have or are being vaccinated. So if a bunch of young adults get it from partying the case rate may go up but deaths will not.

I'm getting mine on Friday.

homebucket Mar 15, 2021 5:26 PM

Quote:

Texas restaurant covered in racist graffiti after owner continues requiring masks
ShaCamree Gowdy
March 15, 2021

A Texas restaurant owner publicly opposed Governor Greg Abbott's decision to lift the state mask mandate — and his place of business suffered for it.

Mike Nguyen, owner of The Noodle Tree ramen restaurant in San Antonio, called the governor's decision "selfish" during a CNN interview.

"I will say that the governor doesn't have us Texans' [best] interest at play at this point," said Nguyen. "I think it's more of a personal interest, I think the decision to drop the mask mandate is selfish and cowardly and there's no reason to do it. Dropping the mask mandate will not help the economy, it will not help us open and a lot of us feel that he's putting a lot of us in danger."

A few days later Nguyen's business was vandalized with racist graffiti, according to Newsweek's Christina Zhao.

Photos shared to Facebook by Elder Eats KSAT 12 showed graffiti covering the windows of the restaurant that included the words, "No Mask," "Kung Flu," "Commie," "Hope U Die" and "Ramen Noodle Flu."

...

"We are Texans and what we do especially in San Antonio is have each others back during times of need. We do the right thing," Nguyen wrote in a post. "Our governor has betrayed us but that doesn't mean we have to follow him blindly. ...We can stand United and do what's right because we are Texan, we are Texas y'all."

Nguyen's words proved true, and the racist incident prompting people to patronize The Noodle Tree. In a post shared via Facebook stories, the restaurant thanked San Antonians for their support and said they were slammed with orders. They eventually sold out of everything and had to close for the night.
https://www.sfgate.com/nation/articl...e-16026768.php

the urban politician Mar 15, 2021 5:38 PM

^ The owner of that restaurant sounds like a butthead.

Dropping the mask mandate doesn't mean "don't wear a mask". You can still wear a mask, and still require it for people to enter your business.

People need to stop being political. I was watching Joe Rogan the other day who was interviewing a gentleman (forgot his name), the guy was on an airplane heading to Dallas and the flight attendant warned him "Watch out for Texas, it's wild out there".

When get got off the plane, he says literally EVERYBODY was wearing masks.

People are still not getting the difference between a Government mandate versus people's behavior. You can still wear a mask without a mandate.

iheartthed Mar 15, 2021 5:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by the urban politician (Post 9218441)
^ The owner of that restaurant sounds like a butthead.

Dropping the mask mandate doesn't mean "don't wear a mask". You can still wear a mask, and still require it for people to enter your business.

People need to stop being political. I was watching Joe Rogan the other day who was interviewing a gentleman (forgot his name), the guy was on an airplane heading to Dallas and the flight attendant warned him "Watch out for Texas, it's wild out there".

When get got off the plane, he says literally EVERYBODY was wearing masks.

People are still not getting the difference between a Government mandate versus people's behavior. You can still wear a mask without a mandate.

Or the governor could've kept the mandate in place according to federal guidelines.

the urban politician Mar 15, 2021 5:47 PM

^ An obvious response

But he didn't. Get over it. It's 2021, March, and the people who are going to wear masks are already wearing them. People who aren't, won't--regardless of (perhaps even in retaliation to) mandates.

Up is up, down is down. Grass is green, the sky is blue. Blah blah blah this is getting old. We really don't need any more lessons

iheartthed Mar 15, 2021 6:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by the urban politician (Post 9218454)
^ An obvious response

But he didn't. Get over it. It's 2021, March, and the people who are going to wear masks are already wearing them. People who aren't, won't--regardless of (perhaps even in retaliation to) mandates.

Up is up, down is down. Grass is green, the sky is blue. Blah blah blah this is getting old. We really don't need any more lessons

And the governor should be criticized for ignoring guidelines. Why is that so hard to acknowledge?

the urban politician Mar 15, 2021 6:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by iheartthed (Post 9218505)
And he should be criticized for ignoring guidelines. Why is that so hard to acknowledge?

Can I have a hug?

I don't know about y'all, but 1st warm day (having been vaccinated months ago, and after my parents get their second shots), I'm headed to a bar and I'm going to drink the biggest pint o swag you'll ever see

God bless beer and drinking at bars.

iheartthed Mar 15, 2021 6:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by the urban politician (Post 9218509)
Can I have a hug?

I don't know about y'all, but 1st warm day (having been vaccinated months ago, and after my parents get their second shots), I'm headed to a bar and I'm going to drink the biggest pint o swag you'll ever see

God bless beer and drinking at bars.

It was a serious question, and I'll ask another: why is the restaurant owner a "butthead" and not the governor? When it was the governor that made the restaurant owner's job harder by not continuing the mask mandate. Isn't the job of government to make citizens lives easier?

the urban politician Mar 15, 2021 6:48 PM

^ I'll also ask a serious question:

Ooops I forgot. I have COVID brain fog..... :(

iheartthed Mar 15, 2021 6:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by the urban politician (Post 9218538)
^ I'll also ask a serious question:

Ooops I forgot. I have COVID brain fog..... :(

So you're a troll?

the urban politician Mar 15, 2021 7:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by iheartthed (Post 9218545)
So you're a troll?

Yes but no worries, I'm wearing my mask

https://i.pinimg.com/originals/b8/af...d759757c9d.jpg

homebucket Mar 15, 2021 7:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by the urban politician (Post 9218441)
I was watching Joe Rogan the other day who was interviewing a gentleman (forgot his name), the guy was on an airplane heading to Dallas and the flight attendant warned him "Watch out for Texas, it's wild out there".

When get got off the plane, he says literally EVERYBODY was wearing masks.

I posted this in the COVID thread yesterday:

Just went on a 3 min walk to my LBS (local boba shop) since I was craving some milk tea. On my way I encountered about 15 pedestrians, 3 cyclists, and 3 joggers. 10 out of the 15 pedestrians weren’t wearing masks. None of the cyclists or joggers were wearing masks. Saw a man with his daughter at the park playground and a guy shooting hoops and a woman chilling on the grass reading a book. No masks.

This is in one of the densest cities and the most liberal in the US.

So I find it very difficult to believe when people claim that in X city, people literally everywhere are wearing masks.

the urban politician Mar 15, 2021 7:57 PM

^ But that's outdoors. Outdoor masking is............................


Dumb

I am about as pro-mask as anyone you'll meet. And I will tell you: if you are outdoors going for a jog, and you are wearing a mask, then you're just being a fool. That, my friend is called:

Hygiene theatre

Pedestrian Mar 15, 2021 8:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jtown,man (Post 9217776)
Cases rising are going to mean less and less over the next month or so.

The most vulnerable have or are being vaccinated. So if a bunch of young adults get it from partying the case rate may go up but deaths will not.

I'm getting mine on Friday.

Or not.

We HOPE it's as you say and not the rise of some variant that can overcome the immunity of the vaccinated and recovered in the heretofore susceptible groups.

It takes further and continuing analysis to be sure.

SlidellWx Mar 15, 2021 8:34 PM

13.4% of metro New Orleans is now fully vaccinated according the latest figures released by the Louisiana Dept. of Health today. https://ldh.la.gov/Coronavirus/

Pedestrian Mar 15, 2021 8:54 PM

Some things in America may never be the same again and it makes me very, very sad.

Quote:

The Met Opera’s Musicians, Unpaid Since April, Are Struggling
By Julia Jacobs
March 15, 2021, 1:00 p.m. ET

As the months without a paycheck wore on, Joel Noyes, a 41-year-old cellist with the Metropolitan Opera, realized that in order to keep making his mortgage payments he would have to sell one of his most valuable possessions: his 19th-century Russian bow. He reluctantly switched back to the inferior one he had used as a child . . . .

The Metropolitan Opera House has been dark for a year, and its musicians have gone unpaid for almost as long. The players in one of the finest orchestras in the world suddenly found themselves relying on unemployment benefits, scrambling for virtual teaching gigs, selling the tools of their trade and looking for cheaper housing. About 40 percent left the New York area. More than a tenth retired.

After the musicians had been furloughed for months, the Met offered them reduced pay in the short term if they agreed to long-term cuts that the company, which estimates that it has lost $150 million in earned revenues, says it will need to survive. When the musicians resisted, the Met offered to begin temporarily paying them up to $1,534 a week — less than half their old pay, but something — if they simply returned to the bargaining table, a proposal the musicians are weighing.

Now the Met’s increasingly rancorous labor battles — it has locked out its stagehands, and outsourced some set construction to Wales — are adding more uncertainty to the question of when the opera house can reopen after its long pandemic shutdown.

The toll on the players has been steep . . . .

The Met, which was financially fragile even before the virus, was forced to shut its doors on March 12, 2020, and it furloughed most of its workers, including those in its orchestra and chorus, in April. (It continued to pay for their health coverage.) In the fall, the Met presented an offer to its employees: it would resume partial payments in exchange for significant long-term pay cuts and concessions. The unions resisted. By the end of the year the Met orchestra was the only major ensemble without a deal to receive pandemic pay, according to the International Conference of Symphony and Opera Musicians.

Then, in December, the company locked out its roughly 300 stagehands after their union, Local One of the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees, rejected the Met’s proposed pay cuts. (In a letter to the union last year, Peter Gelb, the Met’s general manager, wrote that the average full-time stagehand cost the Met $260,000 in 2019, including benefits.)

Mr. Gelb said that the company had no choice but to seek cuts when the pandemic left it in a perilous financial situation . . . .

Many orchestras have reached agreements for substantial, lasting pay cuts, including the New York Philharmonic, whose musicians agreed to 25 percent cuts to their base pay through August 2023. Mr. Krauthamer said that the Met Orchestra’s union had put forward its own proposal, which would cut pay but preserve work rules that the Met was seeking to change.
https://www.nytimes.com/2021/03/15/a...-pandemic.html

The San Francisco Opera is surviving by doing "drive-through" performances this spring, starting the "The Barber of Seville" across the Golden Gate Bridge in Marin County. They have promised to keep supporting their orchestra and other employees through the pandemic and are, I hope, in somewhat better shape than the Met due to some wealthy and enthusiastic Bay Area donors.


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