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NYC4Life Jul 18, 2008 1:11 AM

NEW YORK CITY: Transit Developments
 
NY1

Transit Officials Cut $61 Million From Next Year's Budget

July 16, 2008

City transit officials announced late Wednesday that they will cut jobs and projects to save money in 2009.

Transit officials say when the preliminary budget is unveiled next week, more than 500 jobs and $61 million will be cut.

The cost-cutting plan involves leaving positions unfilled, instead of laying off employees.

NYC Transit had been directed by MTA brass to cut costs by six percent over four years.

A spokesperson says maintenance upgrades will be reduced to prevent any decreases to service and customer safety.

In the wake of a financial crisis, the MTA has warned of another fare hike if state aid is not increased because of a $700 million budget gap.

NYC4Life Jul 18, 2008 1:12 AM

WTC Transit Hub
 
NY1

WTC Transit Hub Starts To Take Shape

http://www.ny1.com/ny1/content/image...144/287417.JPG

July 17, 2008

A series of recently-installed arches in the World Trade Center site is the first major sign of the planned transit hub’s construction. NY1’s Transit reporter Bobby Cuza filed the following report.

At the World Trade Center site, a series of arches has sprouted in recent days. It is the first part of the outline of an underground pedestrian passageway that will one day connect the planned World Trade Center PATH hub to points west.

"This will be a corridor which will connect the PATH hall under West Street to the World Financial Center," said Port Authority Program Manager Saverio Leone.

To get there, workers will have to blast through the western slurry wall and tunnel under West Street. But for now, workers are busy setting the 47 arches in place.

Contoured in design, set atop rounded columns, the curved arches reflect architect Santiago Calatrava's vision for the entire transit hub, with its curved forms and a bird-like structure above ground.

The idea is to create an airy space, and when they are completed, shops will line the north side of the corridor, and the curves will be prominent.

"That is one of the signature components of the Calatrava design. You'll see them, they'll be exposed,” said Leone. “The concrete slab will be above the arch, or the rib. There'll be lighting in between the ribs."

Calatrava's original design for the hub was scaled back once because of security concerns, and again earlier this month, when the Port Authority announced the hub's winged roof will no longer open and close.

But officials say the corridor taking shape here is a sign of progress.

"It's a very positive step here on the project, because you're actually starting to see what this thing -- the vision, where we're going," said Leone.

As for the transit hub itself, the Port Authority is still reevaluating the design in order to bring the project in on budget. Originally scheduled to be complete late next year, the completion date has been pushed back to 2011.

Officials warn it could be pushed back even further.

- Bobby Cuza

NYC4Life Jul 18, 2008 1:15 AM

LIRR East Side Access
 
NY1

First LIRR Tunnel To Grand Central Complete


http://www.ny1.com/ny1/content/image...144/287538.jpg

July 17, 2008

The MTA’s East Side Access project, which will extend the Long Island Rail Road to Grand Central Station, reached a major milestone recently with the completion of a new Midtown tunnel. NY1’s Transit reporter Bobby Cuza filed the following report.

A brand-new tunnel has been completed 16 stories below Midtown Manhattan at Second Avenue and 63rd Street -- the first of two eventual Long Island Rail Road tunnels to Grand Central Station.

The tunnel, which goes west to Park Avenue and then curves south, was dug by hundreds of workers and an enormous mechanical device known as a tunnel-boring machine.

It will eventually form part of MTA’s expansion project, the East Side Access, which will build a new Long Island Rail Road terminal at Grand Central.

"It's basically completed the boring that it has to do to get to Grand Central, so it gives us now the opening space to start creating the cavern for the Grand Central part of the station,” said Joseph Trainor of MTA Capital Construction.

A second boring machine is also at work, carving out a parallel tunnel, though it has reached only as far as 48th Street.

Both machines cut right through Manhattan bedrock, about 120 feet below ground. The debris is then carted away using an elaborate series of conveyor belts all the way to Sunnyside, Queens.

The construction site can be wet and muddy, but to those above ground, the work of the boring machine has been imperceptible.

"It's 120 feet underground, and I don't think that anybody in the area has any idea that it's even made this progress," said Trainor.

"Most people don't have any perception it's there,” said tunnel engineer Edward Kennedy. “We passed within 12 feet underneath 53rd Street subway tunnels. And basically, nobody noticed."

Altogether, the East Side Access project is expected to cost $7.2 billion, including a large portion of federal funds. It's expected to be complete in 2015.

- Bobby Cuza

NYC4Life Jul 18, 2008 1:17 AM

Port Authority Bus Terminal
 
NY1

Color-Coded Art Installation Unveiled At Port Authority

http://www.ny1.com/ny1/content/image...144/287551.jpg

July 17, 2008

As part of the transformation of the area around the Port Authority terminal, a colorful new work of art was unveiled Thursday.

The work is one of the largest public art projects in the terminal's history.

The exhibit labels fruits and vegetables with colors, so people can see how much color should be in a healthy daily diet.

"Create my own nature-matching system, where normal people can actually match color of their fruits and vegetable, and eat them," said the artist, Tattfoo Tan, of his creation. "So if they're eating something unhealthy there will be less color, so they can put more color into their meal."

Passersby were treated to free fruit as part of promotion for the exhibit.

The art project will span the street-level windows on Eighth Avenue between 41st and 42nd Streets and along 42nd Street.

hkskyline Jul 18, 2008 1:43 AM

Wow ... $7.2 billion for just a tunnel into Midtown? That amount can probably build half to a third of a new airport!

Jer8m8 Jul 18, 2008 1:47 AM

Just look how much it costs to build 30 blocks of new subway...and how long...

the urban politician Jul 18, 2008 1:58 AM

^ I know, ridiculous.

I wonder how much it must have cost to build tunnels in 1900, when much of the subway system was built.

Justin10000 Jul 18, 2008 1:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hkskyline (Post 3679913)
Wow ... $7.2 billion for just a tunnel into Midtown? That amount can probably build half to a third of a new airport!

Manhattan is very built up. There is a LOT underground. Not to mention, they are tunneling through some very hard rock. I am not surprised, if it costing that that much.

miketoronto Jul 18, 2008 1:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hkskyline (Post 3679913)
Wow ... $7.2 billion for just a tunnel into Midtown? That amount can probably build half to a third of a new airport!

Well worth the cost. Think of all the tax revenue NYC will be making over the next century by having jobs in Manhattan instead of out in the suburbs.

NJ and NYC are working on a number of projects that will cost billions, but will double capacity into Manhattan.

hkskyline Jul 18, 2008 3:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Justin10000 (Post 3680624)
Manhattan is very built up. There is a LOT underground. Not to mention, they are tunneling through some very hard rock. I am not surprised, if it costing that that much.

Drilling in bedrock is typical for subway construction in large cities. Obviously they can't drill so shallow or else they'll hit the foundations and utilities along the way. Don't think such typical construction methods would warrant the large cost. I wonder what are the components of that 7.2 billion?

To put things into perspective, the Jubilee Line extension in London costed £3.5 billion, which at the time, was about USD $5.6 billion for about 10 miles of extra service and stations. That amount was actually double what was originally estimated. They had to re-engineer and pretty much rebuild Westminster interchange station. It looks so different today!

Matty Jul 18, 2008 9:43 PM

Part of it could be utility relocation? Probably mostly just waste.

philvia Jul 18, 2008 10:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hkskyline (Post 3680842)
Drilling in bedrock is typical for subway construction in large cities.

the rock under manhattan is the hardest in the world

ardecila Jul 19, 2008 2:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by the urban politician (Post 3679947)
^ I know, ridiculous.

I wonder how much it must have cost to build tunnels in 1900, when much of the subway system was built.

Construction costs were lower in 1900-1930, because of
a) cheap, non-union and non-mechanized, immigrant labor
b) shallow cut-and-cover construction (remove street, dig, lay tracks, rebuild street over the top)
c) less utilities under the streets
c) domestic building materials

NYC4Life Jul 22, 2008 10:21 AM

NY1

Going Up?
MTA To Seek Fare Hike For Second Straight Year

http://www.ny1.com/ny1/content/image...145/288066.jpg

July 21, 2008

Only once in the history of the New York City subway has the fare gone up in back-to-back years – but now it looks like it's happening again.

NY1 has learned that Wednesday the MTA plans to propose a fare increase to take effect next July 2009, just over a year after MetroCard increases took effect.

It’s unclear how much the fare will increase. The MTA will only say it needs to increase firebox revenue by eight percent – about $400 million a year.

That could mean hiking the base fare from $2 to $2.25 and raising the price of unlimited MetroCards. But for now, the MTA is only speaking in general terms.

The last time subway fares were increased in two consecutive years was in 1980 and 1981, as the city grappled with rising inflation while the economy drifted into recession.

In addition to the increased revenue from straphangers, the MTA is also seeking $300 million in increased city and state aid. The agency also plans to eliminate the use of free EZ Passes by government agencies, including the NYPD – a measure that could save an estimated $10 million a year.

The agency plans to do about $45 million worth of belt tightening in addition to budget cuts already planned. The intent will be to close a $700 million budget gap that has appeared in recent months.

The MTA has been hit hard both by rising fuel prices and the struggling real estate market, which generates tax revenue for the agency.

The agency’s $29 billion capital plan for 2009 through 2014, which earmarks billions of dollars for expansion projects like East Side Access and the Second Avenue Subway, is $20 billion short by some estimates.

Last week, city transit officials announced plans to cut more than 500 jobs and $61 million from the budget after MTA brass ordered NYC Transit to cut costs by six percent over four years.

None of the proposals are set in stone, including the fare increase. They are part of the MTA's preliminary budget forecast for next year.

By law, the MTA must hold public hearings before raising fares, which wouldn't happen until early next year.

Justin10000 Jul 22, 2008 12:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by philvia (Post 3681693)
the rock under manhattan is the hardest in the world

It's actually one the reasons why New York can build such an amazing skyline. The rock is great support for all the buildings.

That being said, this project is very complex, and I can see where people think it is expensive for a "short" line. They have to drill under the LIRR yards, they have to connect to the 63rd St tunnels, AND still have to bore 140 feet under the Grand Terminal! It's not going to be a simple 2 track terminal. It's going to be 8 tracks, 4 stacked on top of each other. All at 140 feet below the surface.

ThisSideofSteinway Jul 22, 2008 12:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NYC4Life (Post 3687471)
Going Up?
MTA To Seek Fare Hike For Second Straight Year

Ugh. Thank God for Transportation Benefits. :yuck:

NYC4Life Jul 24, 2008 12:20 AM

NY1

Taxi Drivers, Councilmen Demand $1 Fuel Surcharge

http://www.ny1.com/ny1/content/image...145/288378.JPG

July 23, 2008

Several City Council members joined taxi drivers in their fight for some financial relief from rising fuel costs Wednesday.

Lawmakers are urging the Taxi and Limousine Commission to reconsider a $1 fuel surcharge, which was shot down earlier this year.

They say it will help offset high gas prices, which prevent some drivers from paying their monthly lease fees.

"Nobody wants to ask drivers and the general public to pay more,” said Democratic Queens Councilman John Liu. “But the reality is that these gas prices are through the roof. The TLC will say the current rates already reflect some kind of inflation factor for fuel prices. But yet nobody expected inflation to be 100 percent."

"This gas price is just killing us -- all the drivers and all the 5 percent we're paying to all the brokers, and the companies,” said taxi driver Parvinder Singh. “And this fuel surcharge we definitely need now. We have it in 30 cities in the U.S. Why not us?"

Drivers are also asking to TLC to prohibit increases in their lease payments.

In response to calls for the surcharge, TLC Commissioner Matthew W. Daus said, "We looked at the issue carefully, balancing all of the variables – including the industry's overall health, driver earnings and a surcharge's potential negative impact on passengers and ridership – and believe that a surcharge is not warranted."

Daus said he's discussed the matter with the TLC's Board of Commissioners, and that the agency will "continue to monitor the situation closely."

NYC4Life Jul 28, 2008 7:34 PM

NY1

MTA Adds Extra Service During Peak Hours

http://www.ny1.com/ny1/content/image...145/288998.jpg

July 28, 2008

In an effort to reduce some overcrowding on the subway, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority has added some extra service.

The changes, which went into effect today, include a greater frequency of trains, especially during peak travel hours.

NYC Transit says during the morning rush on the Number 4 train, trains will arrive at the station every 10 to 12 minutes, instead of every 15. During the evening rush on the 4, anywhere from one to three minutes has been shaved off the gap between trains.

The changes also affect evening service on the Number 1, the Number 6 and service on the 42nd Street S shuttle.

The total price tag for the increased service is about $8.9 million annually.

NYC transit says the expanded service is being funded by several internal savings initiatives.

manchester united Jul 29, 2008 11:55 AM

And now also the 3 line has a 24/7 service from 148th Harlem to Times Square !!!!

NYC4Life Jul 29, 2008 1:58 PM

NY1

MetroCard Machines Restored Systemwide

July 29, 2008

Problems that plagued MetroCard vending machines should be all cleared up this morning.

New York City Transit is still looking into what caused vending machines systemwide to stop accepting credit and debit cards for several hours during the morning rush, and again during the evening rush yesterday.

The agency says the problem was fixed late last night.

Justin10000 Jul 29, 2008 3:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by manchester united (Post 3700844)
And now also the 3 line has a 24/7 service from 148th Harlem to Times Square !!!!


I saw your name...

GUNNERS FOREVER!!!!!

NYC4Life Jul 30, 2008 12:42 AM

NY1

L Train Gets The Best Marks In Annual Straphanger Report

http://www.ny1.com/ny1/content/image...145/289091.jpg

July 29, 2008

The L train got top marks while the W train was rated the worst in the Straphangers Campaign's annual report, released Tuesday.

While the L was rated the third most crowded line at rush hour by the New York Public Interest Group's transit advocacy group, it won high marks on every other performance measure, ranking close to the top in car cleanliness, and scoring the best of any line in clear announcements and trains arriving on schedule.

Most riders on the L train agreed that the cars were clean and the service dependable.

"It's a pretty good train," said one rider. "It's reliable, and it comes frequently, and it's clean."

"It is very clean," agreed another.

"It's very clean. It's always on time," said a third. "If there is a delay, they let you know in advance. Yeah, in my opinion it's the best."

Riders also said they liked the next-train arrival information.

"I wish every subway line would have it," said a passenger. "Sometimes when I'm waiting, I don't know if I'm waiting one minute, or a half hour. Should I take a cab? Should I take the bus? The L train is the only train that tells you when the next train is coming."

Rounding out the top five are the Number 7 train, the Q train, and, in a tie for fourth place, the Number 1 train and the Number 6 line.

Late last year, the L train and the 7 became the first lines in the system to undergo a management restructuring. Transit officials put a general manager in charge of each line, with the authority and the independence to cut through bureaucratic red tape and fix problems as they see fit.

So far, the Straphangers Campaign says the program seems to be working.

"Having an actual human being in charge whose name you know, and who's accountable, and has more authority for improving the quality of service makes a lot of sense," said Gene Russianoff of the Straphangers Campaign.

As for the worst train, that would be the W, just edging out the M train.

"I live at the end of the W line, and it does seem to take a while to come and go," said a rider.

In fact, the W has the most infrequent service in the system, running trains ten minutes apart – even at rush hour.

As for the system overall, the report finds a drop in some levels of performance. For instance, subway cars are breaking down more frequently, and the percentage of clear announcements was also down, all of which is not encouraging news at a time when fares are headed up.

- Bobby Cuza

Meanwhile, Brooklyn Assemblyman Dov Hikind expressed Tuesday his discontent over the condition of subway stations and the city's transit agency.

Hikind announced in Borough Park that his office surveyed nearly 100 subway stations and found dangerous conditions in more than half of them.

He claims a 14-year-old fell off the platform after the rotted wooden board gave way, another teen had his shoe slip between the train and the platform and a woman in her car was hit by a piece of rail track that fell from an elevated train.

Hikind says the MTA is at fault, and riders should get their two dollars’ worth before another proposed fare hike is put into place.

"Who the hell is in charge, who is responsible, how can this go on even for another day?” said Hikind. “This has nothing to do with budget situations. This is about plywood, hammers, nails, carpenters."

MTA officials say they take the safety of their customers seriously and are committed to addressing all poor conditions by December.

NYC4Life Jul 30, 2008 7:39 PM

NY1

Glitch With Baggage System Causes Delays At JFK

http://www.ny1.com/ny1/content/image...145/289301.jpg

July 30, 2008

Flights have been delayed at John F. Kennedy Airport as a result of a glitch in a baggage checking system.

American Airlines is having problems with a conveyor belt, forcing workers to sort bags manually.

More than two dozen flights have been delayed by at least an hour.

The airline is working to fix the problem.

In the meantime, passengers are being alerted that their luggage may not make it aboard their plane. They are being given the option of taking off anyway and getting their bags delivered to them later, or waiting until they can get a flight with their bags.

NYC4Life Jul 30, 2008 9:14 PM

NY1

MTA Looking To Get Rid Of All Toll Booths For Bridges, Tunnels

http://www.ny1.com/ny1/content/image...145/289298.jpg

July 30, 2008

MTA is looking to get rid of toll booths, but not tolls, on its bridges and tunnels.

The agency has issued a request for proposals to create a system that would collect the money from vehicles with E-ZPass, and use license plate cameras to collect from others.

The Port Authority is looking to do the same thing for its bridges and tunnels.

It is hoping to get rid of all toll booths in the next four years.

philvia Jul 31, 2008 1:10 AM

just curious... but why? ^^
lol

NYC4Life Jul 31, 2008 6:51 PM

NY1

Baggage System Fixed At JFK; Operations Return To Normal

http://www.ny1.com/ny1/content/image...145/289393.jpg

July 31, 2008

Employees with American Airlines say the baggage system is up and running at John F. Kennedy Airport, but the airline is still working to reunite travelers with their bags – following yesterday's software glitch that caused major delays.

The computer problem appears to be fixed and operations are returning to normal.

American was forced to cancel five flights for today.

Passengers who arrived for flights this morning said they got to the airport early today after hearing about yesterday's problems.

"We just left a half-hour earlier than planned and so far, so good," said one passenger.

"As far as today goes, it was excellent. We went right through," said another. "The guy who took the bags was very, very nice. I'm very happy with American Airlines today."

American says the problem was caused by a software failure in the computer that reads the bar code on each piece of tagged luggage and then sends it on a conveyor belt to the proper gate.
The problem caused 48 flights to be delayed.

American gave passengers the choice of waiting out the problem, traveling from another airport, or flying on and having the bags delivered later. In light of the problem, the airline waived its $15 fee for the first checked bag on domestic flights.

NYC4Life Aug 1, 2008 1:26 AM

NY1

Transit Officials Pinpoint Source Of MetroCard Machine Glitch

http://www.ny1.com/ny1/content/image...145/289483.jpg

July 31, 2008

Transit officials said Thursday that they have pinpointed the source of the problem that caused thousands of subway riders to be overcharged on their debit and credit cards earlier this week.

MetroCard vending machines throughout the system malfunctioned on Monday and Tuesday, resulting in thousands of riders having their debit or credit cards charged for cards they did not receive.

Transit officials finally had some answers Thursday, saying the problem had been traced to the failure of an encrypter in their data center. The encrypter, one of two used in the system, is responsible for processing electronic data before it's sent for authorization. The failure meant that the MetroCard machine would time out and show customers an error message, even though their cards had been charged.

The problem persisted through three consecutive rush hours, however, because the encrypter appeared to be working.

"I'm not happy with the fact that it took three rush hours to discover that and fix it," said NYC Transit President Howard Roberts. "Everybody will get a refund."

Roberts said the problem has been resolved and stressed that every penny will be credited back to riders' accounts within seven to 10 business days. He added that the machines are due for replacement.

For some, the explanation and the refund are too little too late. NY1 has heard from more than one rider who said the false charges from the MTA resulted in bounced checks and overdraft charges from the bank.

NYC4Life Aug 1, 2008 3:33 AM

NY1

Transit Officials To Ease Congestion At S.I. Expressway

July 31, 2008

The State Department of Transportation announced Thursday new plans to improve a two-mile stretch of one of the city's busiest highways -- the Staten Island Expressway. NY1’s Joe Malvasio filed the following report.

It's not uncommon to ride your brakes for the entire stretch of Staten Island Expressway.

“The highway is the worst when people are going to work in the morning, or coming home in the evening,” said a commuter.

To help ease congestion, State Department of Transportation officials announced Thursday major comprehensive changes to the busiest stretch of the expressway, from Sunnyside to the Verrazano Bridge.

“We'll reconfigure entrance and exit ramps in both eastbound and westbound directions,” said DOT Deputy Commissioner Stan Gee.

Drivers can expect big changes to their daily routines, including six new ramps intended to speed up the commute, improve traffic flow and help get buses on and off the expressway. Two entrances would be completely removed and related to areas DOT officials say could better handle the traffic.

The agency said the new interchanges would be in locations with better merges and longer roadways to help drivers get on and off the highway.

Other changes include improvements to the ramps at Clove Road and new barriers to help keep cars bound for the expressway from using local roads as short cuts.

“This is great news,” said Republican Mid-Island Councilman James Oddo. “The Staten Island Expressway is the key thoroughfare on Staten Island and every improvement they make on the Staten Island Expressway has an associated positive impact on our community.”

DOT said the project will cost $50 million and take two years to complete.

While the construction will cause short term headaches for drivers, Democratic North Shore Councilman and congressional candidate Michael McMahon says the changes will improve Staten Island commutes in the long run.

“I think it will be worth it, when it is all said and done, the project is finished,” said McMahon. “People’s lives on Staten Island will be much better.”

Construction is slated to start in spring 2010.

jamesinclair Aug 1, 2008 6:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by philvia (Post 3704838)
just curious... but why? ^^
lol

You dont have to pay for collectors and cars dont slow down.

NYC4Life Aug 3, 2008 3:19 PM

NY1

Some New Subway Cars Will Lack Rush Hour Seats

http://www.ny1.com/ny1/content/image...145/289748.jpg

August 02, 2008

New York City Transit officials are planning a pilot program featuring subway trains with flip-up seats in four of the 10 cars.

The flip-up seats will be locked in the upright position during rush hour and unlocked afterwards.

Officials are hoping to fit as many as 18 percent more people inside those cars.

As of Saturday, it was not known which subway lines will be a part of the test run.

The program is expected to roll out in five to seven months.

NYC4Life Aug 3, 2008 3:21 PM

NY1

MTA Lacks Funds To Improve City's Subway Stations

http://www.ny1.com/ny1/content/image...145/289822.JPG

August 03, 2008

The top official at New York City Transit said he is aware of the decrepit state of many subway stations, but lacks the funds to fix them.

NYC Transit President Howard Roberts told the New York Post that less than 25 percent of stations are in acceptable condition.

Mounting costs and projected budget deficits will likely prevent the agency from bringing the substandard stations up to shape.

The agency is pushing for two fare hikes over the next three years, but Roberts tells the Post the money can only maintain current conditions.

State Assemblyman Dov Hikind released a study last week that brought attention to dangerous conditions at dozens of stations.

NYC4Life Aug 4, 2008 6:15 PM

NY1

Study Shows Most Subways Are Consistently Cool

http://www.ny1.com/ny1/content/image...145/289920.jpg

August 04, 2008

New York City Transit released a report today showing that 97.3 percent of all subway cars met its air conditioning standards in June and July.

That number would be even better were it not for the E train, where only 83 percent of the cars were 78 degrees or cooler.

When transit officials tested 120 cars on the E line, they found the temperature in seven of them hit 88 degrees or higher.

The E cars were built in 1964 and 1965, making them the oldest ones in the system and the toughest to keep working at peak performance.

New York City Transit President Howard Roberts told the Daily News that he's made air conditioning a top priority. He says he's boosted the frequency of temperature readings in cars and is giving trophies to superintendents who keep their cars cool.

NYC4Life Aug 4, 2008 6:16 PM

NY1

Port Authority To Block Flights Acquired By Federal Auction

http://www.ny1.com/ny1/content/image...145/289965.jpg


August 04, 2008

The Port Authority said today that it will fight the federal government's plan to try and tackle the nation's flight delays.

The Bush administration is planning an experimental auction of takeoff and landing slots. However, PA officials say they will block any flights at John F. Kennedy, Newark Liberty International, and LaGuardia, that are the result of those auctions.

The Port Authority is against the plan because it says it will lead to a 12-percent increase on ticket prices.

The White House says delays from New York's airports have a cascade effect, causing spillover delays all across the country.

Zerton Aug 6, 2008 1:39 AM

^That 'article' left me very confused. What exactly is the auction thing?

ThisSideofSteinway Aug 6, 2008 10:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Zerton (Post 3716637)
^That 'article' left me very confused. What exactly is the auction thing?

I think what they mean (and correct me if I'm wrong, anyone else) is that airlines must bid for the opportunity to, say, arrive at Terminal 4 at 9 AM. I guess the PA is suddenly concerned about the sudden ballooning side charges that are becoming part of flying these days.

NYC4Life Aug 6, 2008 5:16 PM

NY1

New Campaign Encourages Straphangers To Report Gropers

http://www.ny1.com/ny1/content/image...146/290237.jpg

August 06, 2008

NYC Transit is launching an anti-groping campaign next month.

The agency is set to flood the system with some 2,000 posters next month, warning potential gropers that a crowded train is no excuse for improper touching. The posters also encourage anyone who is groped to tell MTA workers or the police.

The move comes after a survey last year by Manhattan Borough President Scott Stringer found 63 percent of women riders polled said they had been sexually harassed.

Some riders NY1 spoke with said groping is a problem.

"When the train is really crowded, they do try to get too close to you and to touch you," said one subway rider.

"I think it's a terrible thing," said another. "You're just trying to get to work and trying to get home and there's nothing that should happen between those two things; that's inappropriate."

"If I was groped on the subway and I saw the sign with the number, yes I would like to report it," said a third. "However, what would I tell them? Who would I describe? At what time will they be able to contact this person? It's hard to follow up with something like that."

The NYPD says police have arrested 119 people this year for sexual abuse or lewdness on the subways.

Busy Bee Aug 6, 2008 7:04 PM

I thought I was groped one time, but it was just a seeing eye dog smelling my butt.http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/images/smilies/wink.gif

NYC4Life Aug 7, 2008 9:55 AM

NY1

Group Says Some City Subway Stations Have Been Long Neglected

http://www.ny1.com/ny1/content/image...146/290322.jpg

August 06, 2008

After surveying more than 50 stations over the last month, the New York City Transit Riders Council said Wednesday that their findings show some of the city's subway stations have been neglected for decades.

The group says water damage, lack of proper signage, and peeling paint are among some rider complaints.

"Unfortunately, many of the places we went are in varying degrees of disrepair, decay, and decadence," said NYC Transit Riders Council chair Andrew Albert. "I do not want to put this on this one administration. For these stations to have reached the conditions that they are in took decades of neglect."

New York City Transit says lack of funding has made keeping up repairs difficult, but it is now taking steps to improve conditions.

It has proposed including $71 million in their Capital Plan to address problem areas incrementally.

the urban politician Aug 7, 2008 3:28 PM

It's hot down here!
 
Why is it that trains are most delayed in the summer for some reason? This especially when waiting at the subway station is so much more uncomfortable this time of year. I may actually need to start bringing a hand towel with me to wipe off the neverending sweat dripping down my brow as I wait and wait and wait.

NYC4Life Aug 11, 2008 6:30 PM

NY1

MTA Unveils "Sleep Mode" Escalators

http://www.ny1.com/ny1/content/image...146/290838.jpg

August 11, 2008

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority has unveiled a new escalator technology that will go into effect today.

The escalators are equipped with sensors, telling escalators to slow down to a crawl when no one is using them, and to speed up when a rider approaches.

The technology, which uses infrared motion sensors, aims to save on energy costs. The MTA estimates that it will save $2,000 a year.

However, some riders who spoke with NY1 said they were hesitant about the success of the new escalators.

"The escalators don't always work, so I don't know what use [the new technology] will be," said one subway rider.

"It's much better than them not working at all!" said another. "If in fact it goes really slow when I'm not on it and actually works when I'm on it, so much the better."

Transit officials also say the new machines will need less maintenance.

"The system that we just put in is going to put less wear and tear on the escalators, which is a crucial issue because we're going to a slower mode when you don't have that demand," said MTA Executive Director and Chief Executive Officer Elliot "Lee" Sander.

Four stations are taking part in the pilot program. The escalators can be found at the Herald Square station, the Roosevelt Island station, the Jamaica Van Wyck station, and the Jamaica Center Parsons Archer Station.

dchan Aug 11, 2008 7:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NYC4Life (Post 3728096)
Four stations are taking part in the pilot program. The escalators can be found at the Herald Square station, the Roosevelt Island station, the Jamaica Van Wyck station, and the Jamaica Center Parsons Archer Station.

I guess don't want to touch the 53rd St. and Lexington Ave. escalators right now.

NYCboy1212 Aug 11, 2008 8:48 PM

You skipped August 7
http://www.amny.com/news/local/am-mt...,2056947.story

Scruffy Aug 12, 2008 5:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NYC4Life (Post 3728096)
NY1

MTA Unveils "Sleep Mode" Escalators

http://www.ny1.com/ny1/content/image...146/290838.jpg

August 11, 2008

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority has unveiled a new escalator technology that will go into effect today.

The escalators are equipped with sensors, telling escalators to slow down to a crawl when no one is using them, and to speed up when a rider approaches.

The technology, which uses infrared motion sensors, aims to save on energy costs. The MTA estimates that it will save $2,000 a year.

However, some riders who spoke with NY1 said they were hesitant about the success of the new escalators.

"The escalators don't always work, so I don't know what use [the new technology] will be," said one subway rider.

"It's much better than them not working at all!" said another. "If in fact it goes really slow when I'm not on it and actually works when I'm on it, so much the better."

Transit officials also say the new machines will need less maintenance.

"The system that we just put in is going to put less wear and tear on the escalators, which is a crucial issue because we're going to a slower mode when you don't have that demand," said MTA Executive Director and Chief Executive Officer Elliot "Lee" Sander.

Four stations are taking part in the pilot program. The escalators can be found at the Herald Square station, the Roosevelt Island station, the Jamaica Van Wyck station, and the Jamaica Center Parsons Archer Station.

I would have thought the stop/ start would wear the motor down more. Roosevelt island makes sense, its not that busy a station especially late night and its so deep. but Jamaica and Herald Sq seem so busy that the escalators would be running constantly anyways.

NYC4Life Aug 12, 2008 8:06 PM

NY1

City Proposes Tracking All Vehicles Entering Manhattan

http://media.ny1.com/media/2008/8/12...0e5e757fbe.jpg

Plans are in the works for a sweeping new security plan that would include photographing every vehicle entering Manhattan in an effort to prevent a terror attack.

The plan, called Operation Sentinel, calls for photographing and scanning the license plate of every vehicle at all bridges and tunnels and using sensors to detect radioactivity. The information on each vehicle would be sent to a command center in Lower Manhattan where it would be indexed and stored for at least a month.

According to the New York Times, some of the technology is still being perfected.

While some privacy concerns have been raised, most drivers NY1 spoke with this morning said they did not have a problem with the plan.

"Anything for security. It doesn't bother me a bit," said one driver. "It should bother the people who have something to worry about."

"If you have nothing to hide, how can it hurt?" said another.

"I'm liberal when it comes to I don't like Big Brother watching everything you do, but you know in these times, what are you gonna do?" said a third.

"As long as everyone's safe. That's number one," said a fourth.

The proposal is just one element of the latest security plan that's mainly focused on the World Trade Center site. It includes placing the entire area within a security zone, in which only specially screened taxis, limousines, and cars would be allowed through barriers manned by police officers at five entry points.

According to the New York Times, the barriers raised concerns among downtown companies that say it will make doing business in the area more difficult.

The New York Police Department says that people entering every day will be able to enter a program where their cars can be pre-screened.

The NYPD insists that the program will not be disruptive to pedestrians.

NYC4Life Aug 12, 2008 8:07 PM

NY1

Three Accused Of Selling MetroCards From Broken Machine

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Three straphangers are accused of turning a malfunctioning Metropolitan Transportation Authority ticketing machine into an $800,000 free-fare windfall.

Agency officials say the scheme started in 2005, when the MTA says a Long Island woman stumbled across a machine in Penn Station that gave her free cards and rail tickets.

An MTA spokesman says it was a one-in-a-million glitch related to the specific machine, her low debit card balance, and an out-of-area bank account.

The agency says that from September of 2005 until last May, the woman, her husband, and a Manhattan man got free tickets from the machine and sold them to a list of clients.

Straphangers who spoke with NY1 had mixed reactions to the scam.

"They don't have very good auditors. Something's wrong with the computer system perhaps," said one New Yorker.

"They got away with it for so long it's not their fault," added another. "They just used their means, what they had at the time, but at the same time, it's not right to steal."

"It's unethical, it's immoral, so they should suffer the consequences," added a third.

They were caught when a routine audit found the glitch.

NYC4Life Aug 28, 2008 7:23 PM

NY1

MTA's Plan To Prevent Flooding Faces Opposition

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08/27/2008 10:47 AM

It was just over a year ago that flooding from a sudden rainstorm crippled the subway system, knocking out service on virtually every line at the height of the morning rush. The MTA is now taking steps to prevent a repeat, but NY1 transit reporter Bobby Cuza reports, the plan is running into some community opposition.

It was the kind of deluge that's so rare, it's known as a 100-year storm – and for something that has happened so infrequently, some say one of the MTA's solutions makes no sense.

"The proposed solution to a 100-year flood risk is a permanent solution, so we're going to have to live with it for the 99 and 3/4 years that we don't have floods,” said Roger Byrom of Community Board 1.

That permanent solution is new street furniture that elevates the sidewalk grates, preventing water from cascading down into the system. The design also features benches and bike racks. In the next week or so, a prototype will be installed on West Broadway, with many more to follow.

But the local community board says the MTA should have a better response plan for heavy rains, instead of installing permanent structures they say will crowd the sidewalks and detract from a historic district. Then again, those 100 year storms aren't so rare anymore.

"I think what we've found is that we've been having 100-year storms a lot more frequently than every 100 years,” said MTA Deputy Executive Director Christopher Boylan. “In fact, some of the locations that we're looking at, we've had numerous instances of flooding over the last year, year and a half, two years and so we need to do something."

One prototype has already been installed on Hillside Avenue and Sutphin Boulevard, to be unveiled soon. It's bound to be an improvement over the MTA's short-term fix in the neighborhood: laying down blue tarp over the grates, weighed down with buckets of cement.

Plans to install benches and bike racks also sparked opposition on the Upper West Side, where the MTA planned to install them not on the sidewalks, but on the center mall at 79th, 86th and 91st Streets.

One objection there was that the design would clash with the existing wooden benches. The MTA is now reconsidering the design, but points out it worked with several other agencies in developing the concept.

"We worked with the arts commission, we worked with the landmarks preservation commission, they liked those designs. We're hoping the public will, and we're interested in some of the feedback when we put the prototypes out,” says Boylan.

Based on that feedback, the MTA says it may tweak the design, but says the most important thing is keeping the water out.

NYC4Life Aug 28, 2008 7:28 PM

NY1

Transit Worker Claims He Must Choose Between Using The Bathroom, Keeping His Job

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By: Bobby Cuza


While most people take it for granted that they can use the restroom at work when they need it, one subway worker says he's been forced to choose between using the bathroom and keeping his job. NY1's Bobby Cuza filed the following report.

For subway conductor James Mitchell, it all started on a downtown R train some nine years ago. He says he needed to use the bathroom, so he held the train at the City Hall station, and used the facilities in a dispatcher's office.

He said it took no more than four minutes, but he soon had two disciplinary claims filed against him – neither one for the brief stop.

"The Transit Authority cannot discipline an employee for using the bathroom, so what they do, they manufacture a rule violation," said Mitchell.

While those charges were dropped, it was not the end of his trouble. Mitchell was diagnosed with irritable bowl syndrome, and over the past nine years, he's stopped his train several times to use the bathroom.

That has led to more problems. Mitchell is currently reassigned to platform duty and says management is trying to fire him, using trumped-up charges that he filed medical forms that were not filled out properly.

"Every time he has anything related to this disability, which is a documented disability, supervision tries to get him fired, one way or another," said attorney John McHugh.

"It's as if they want to penalize you for being sick," added Mitchell.

Mitchell has sought treatment for his condition. In 2007, he underwent surgery to remove more than a foot of his intestines, and he says altogether he's been hospitalized seven times.

As for the passengers left waiting during Mitchell's bathroom breaks, he says they were told only there was a delay and the train would be moving shortly.

"I can understand that the passengers have to be where they want to go, but at the same time, I can't operate a train safely if I have a sudden urgency to use the men's room," he said.

Mitchell tried unsuccessfully to sue NYC Transit, and has filed several grievances. He's says the agency owes him about $12,000 in back pay, and he argues the delays he's caused are not significant.

"In the nine years or eight years this has been going on, he's stopped the train, I think, four times, for a total of less than 20 or 30 minutes – total," said his attorney. "And kids holding doors in rush hour hold trains up for longer than that."

NYC Transit said it could not comment on internal disciplinary matters. Mitchell's case is now going to arbitration.

hkskyline Aug 29, 2008 1:20 AM

I don't think we should put someone with an illness like that in the driving seat in the first place.

Swede Aug 29, 2008 8:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NYC4Life (Post 3728096)
NY1

MTA Unveils "Sleep Mode" Escalators

http://www.ny1.com/ny1/content/image...146/290838.jpg

August 11, 2008

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority has unveiled a new escalator technology that will go into effect today.

The escalators are equipped with sensors, telling escalators to slow down to a crawl when no one is using them, and to speed up when a rider approaches.

This is new? I know several places in Stockholm that already has this. Older ones you have to get on before they get going, but renovated ones are fast on the uptake and are going almost full speed by the time I get on. Sitting alone on a station with all the escalators shutting down from lack of use in the last 5 minutes is... eerie. And kinda cool.

NYC4Life Aug 29, 2008 6:36 PM

NY1

08/28/2008 05:44 PM

New Video Screens To Alert Subway Riders

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Transit officials are testing a new program to alert subway riders with digital announcement boards in the event of delays.

Straphangers at six stations on the 7 and L lines will see video screens inside token booths as part of a pilot program.

For now, they are only broadcasting public service announcements, but officials say they will provide up-to-the-minute information on service disruptions.

The Station Agent Information Display program, or SAID, cost the MTA $30,000 so far.

Officials at the rail control center will be able to send messages to individual stations, or groups of stations using wireless technology.

"This SAID program is a way to provide better-quality, more timely information to our customers,” said 7 Line Deputy General Manager John Hoban. “It helps our agents to be more involved in the dissemination of information in the stations. And it takes the place of an old tried-and-true technology, which is that grease board behind the agent."

White boards will remain in the booths for now as a backup.

If the program is deemed a success, it could be expanded elsewhere in the transit system.


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