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-   -   NEW YORK | Hudson Yards | VESSEL | 154.6 FT (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum//showthread.php?t=221513)

jsbrook Sep 14, 2016 10:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NYguy (Post 7561630)
Right, that was never a reference to height. That would be absurd, considering it will be surrounded by towers as tall or taller than the Eiffel Tower. It will be an iconic structure/structure that will come to symbolize the new New York of the Hudson Yards. The area, already flowibg with tourists due to it's connection to the High Line, will become one of the must see destinations. It will be something you can experience, rather than just look at. New York is lucky enough to have multiple such icons- the Statue of Liberty, Empire State Building, Brooklyn Bridge, etc. This, along with others such as the NY Wheel, will be among the new icons of this century. There was a New York that existed before those older icons. But we can only imagine NY with them now. It will be no different for the new.

I am a big fan of the WTC performing arts center as a new icon. The renders look phenomenal, especially the nighttime renders. The overall complex is really shaping up. I think the Culture Shed in Hudson Yard's will also be great. Here's to new icons! (whether they rival the Eiffel Tower or not). It's all about space making, which is what Hudson Yards and WTC are both setting out to do in ways we haven't often seen. I think they will be successful.

NYguy Sep 14, 2016 11:58 PM

http://www.businessinsider.com/hudso...erpiece-2016-9


http://static1.businessinsider.com/i...dens-below.jpg



http://static1.businessinsider.com/i...ned-towers.jpg



http://static5.businessinsider.com/i...-aesthetic.jpg



http://static2.businessinsider.com/i...-statement.jpg



http://www.archdaily.com/795336/heat...on-yards-image

http://images.adsttc.com/media/image...jpg?1473881965

NYguy Sep 15, 2016 12:12 AM

http://www.architecturaldigest.com/s...icks-unveiling

Quote:

The tower, which is being fabricated in Italy at an estimated cost of $150 million, will be able to accommodate up to 1,000 people at once. It’s been christened Vessel—“at least until someone comes up with a better, funnier, New Yorkier name,” Heatherwick said. At an unveiling ceremony this morning in Manhattan, emceed by Anderson Cooper and attended by New York mayor Bill de Blasio, Ross said, “Everyone who comes to New York visits the Christmas tree at Rockefeller Center. We were looking for a 365-day Christmas tree.”


http://forum.skyscraperpage.com/show...=1#post7561718

Quote:

“This is ultimately a Keep Fit project,” says the British designer Thomas Heatherwick of his new $150m commission for New York, unveiled today in Hudson Yards, the major redevelopment project on Manhattan’s West Side. Made of 154 interlinked staircases and 80 platforms, that add up to nearly 2,500 steps, Heatherwick’s Vessel will serve as the centrepiece of a five-acre public square and gardens built over a city rail yard.

“The idea was that we could make something that you could get up at 6am every morning and you’re walking up the equivalent of 16 storeys,” Heatherwick tells The Art Newspaper. “It’s an achievement to get to the top and get back down.” The designer points to a particularly New York way of life that manages to include fitness in a busy schedule. “I remember coming to New York as a teenager and I’d never seen people in suits with bright white trainers—just powerwalking to work,” he says.

.....“Rather than make something that you just look at, and you’re supposed to clap and admire in some way, we were interested in how we could make it have a different social function,” Heatherwick says. “In a space that can hold thousands of people, the notion was not really just making a thing, it was about lifting the people up to see each other.”

The designer is also quick to emphasise that the point was not to create another monumental sculpture. “There’s a 1200-ft high tower, which will have NY’s highest observation deck next to it. It’s really more about this human scale,” Heatherwick says. “There’s often city bashing, people being very negative about what a city is. But looked at from another angle, a city is a very special thing. The way, when a city works well, we protect each other, we protect strangers.” Perhaps that is why in the renderings, the piece resembles a giant openwork hive, with people buzzing around its various levels.


James Bond Agent 007 Sep 15, 2016 12:16 AM

Escher comes to life.

http://d31vc4ph21db4c.cloudfront.net..._611_586_s.jpg

antinimby Sep 15, 2016 12:33 AM

It's cute and is a cool piece of work in its own right but it is nowhere near the iconic level of the Eiffel Tower.

Also, what's the point for climbing to the top? What exactly are you going to see from the top that you can't from ground level and even if there is something you can see, is that really worth the climb?

streetscaper Sep 15, 2016 1:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by antinimby (Post 7561756)

Also, what's the point for climbing to the top? What exactly are you going to see from the top that you can't from ground level and even if there is something you can see, is that really worth the climb?


I will definitely be climbing to the top primarily to see this spectacular view (below). Don't know where else in the world (let alone "ground level") you can see something like this (especially on such a monumental scale)



http://static1.businessinsider.com/i...dens-below.jpg

antinimby Sep 15, 2016 1:31 AM

Well, yeah if you're talking about the structure itself but I was thinking more in terms of the surrounding view.

streetscaper Sep 15, 2016 4:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by antinimby (Post 7561836)
Well, yeah if you're talking about the structure itself but I was thinking more in terms of the surrounding view.

Well you asked "Also, what's the point for climbing to the top?" and I gave you an answer I think would apply to most people's desires when visiting the structure.
"The point" might not end up principally being to look at the surrounding view, it might very well be to look at the internal view.

streetscaper Sep 15, 2016 4:27 AM

https://d3l69jicnm08r4.cloudfront.ne...e9eb1af83a.jpg

antinimby Sep 15, 2016 4:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by streetscaper (Post 7562021)
Well you asked "Also, what's the point for climbing to the top?" and I gave you an answer I think would apply to most people's desires when visiting the structure.
"The point" might not end up principally being to look at the surrounding view, it might very well be to look at the internal view.

While you brought up a good point that the view "in" might actually be more interesting, and which I hadn't thought of at first and which I don't necessarily disagree with, I do however think that the average visitor will not be aware of that. For most people, going up a structure, it's the view out that is normally the goal.

JACKinBeantown Sep 15, 2016 12:14 PM

It looks really cool.

Sadly, I predict that it could be a popular destination for those wishing to jump.

alex1217 Sep 15, 2016 2:14 PM

I wonder if not having any disability access will affect the final design?

forj Sep 15, 2016 2:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by alex1217 (Post 7562370)
I wonder if not having any disability access will affect the final design?

do we know as a fact that it doesnt have disability access? the internal view is looking down some sort of section that isnt steps.. i figured that could be an elevator or something. would be a pretty big oversight on the part of the designer not to include disability access

frabjous Sep 15, 2016 3:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by forj (Post 7562451)
do we know as a fact that it doesnt have disability access? the internal view is looking down some sort of section that isnt steps.. i figured that could be an elevator or something. would be a pretty big oversight on the part of the designer not to include disability access

It says in the NYT article that it will have an elevator to the top. I'm sure that the ADA applies to this structure.
This is definitely going to be called "the hive" by locals.

Jonovision Sep 15, 2016 4:09 PM

I can't quite tell from the renderings and I didn't see it mentioned in the article, but will it be completely enclosed? Is there glass in those large openings and a roof of sorts overhead?

While I think the aesthetic of it being open to the elements is really nice, its not practical all year round. Can you imagine having to shovel all those stairs after a snow storm?!

De Minimis NY Sep 15, 2016 4:09 PM

I’m blown away. For me, the design greatly exceeds the hype.

NYC is full of beautiful views, but unfortunately the chaotic nature of pedestrian traffic often makes it difficult to casually wander the streets and take them in. Everyone walks with a purpose—outside of our parks, you’re basically always on a human conveyor belt.

(You may remember that the original Midtown East rezoning proposal sought to remedy this very problem by widening the median on Park Avenue to create a new pedestrian pathway in the center).

This design addresses that problem in such a creative way. It adds a mile of extra sidewalk above our heads, created specifically for just standing around and enjoying the moment, with completely unique views inside and out, and happens greatly increase the pedestrian holding capacity of the plaza in the process.

Think about the winding paths of Central Park… they’re really pretty inconvenient for cutting directly from one side of the park to the other, but that’s not the point. They were designed for nice strolls around the park, where the objective isn’t to get anywhere, just to enjoy the walk. This takes that centuries-old concept and pulls it up into the air, conjuring up a mile of pathways on a relatively tiny footprint (note that the base is actually quite small). Below you have a canopy of overhang to stand under in the rain or for shade. The reflective materials create thousands of unique views of stairs in all directions (as mentioned by others, very Escher-esque), and will become extreme Instagram fodder like the cloud gate has in Chicago.

It’s like nothing anywhere else in the world, and will surely become a major landmark the moment it is finished.

ardecila Sep 15, 2016 7:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by antinimby (Post 7561756)
It's cute and is a cool piece of work in its own right but it is nowhere near the iconic level of the Eiffel Tower.

Well, of course not. Iconic status is earned over time. Buildings and structures become icons, but they don't start off that way.

LouisVanDerWright Sep 15, 2016 8:44 PM

Serious question: how is this thing going to be ADA compliant? Is there an elevator hidden somewhere? Or does it not have to be since it is "art" and not a building?


Edit: someone asked this above, whoops.

aaron38 Sep 15, 2016 9:03 PM

In the image that looks straight down to the center, the thing at the bottom of an image looks to me like a lift that slides up/down at an angle. Look at the bottom, there's a railing with side openings, and that cart thing would slide down to fit.
If that isn't a lift than what is it? It breaks the symmetry if it has no function.

aaron38 Sep 15, 2016 9:05 PM

As for the structure itself, it's interesting but what does it do? The Eifel Tower is huge by Parisian standards, towering over the city, it's a landmark that can be seen. This is buried inside a group of towers. Where can it be seen by except there in the plaza?
That and it's inverted, it doesn't soar. It reminds me more of a children's play house, more than something to be inspired by.


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