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-   -   How Is Covid-19 Impacting Life in Your City? (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showthread.php?t=242036)

dave8721 Mar 22, 2020 4:58 AM

Not happy that they closed the parks in Miami-Dade County. Even Everglades National Park is closed. I heard Marinas were open so I tried to take the kids out to one that has a long walk along the water but nope. They were only letting people in who had business with their boats. They literally had cops in cop cars there to stop anyone who tried to walk in the park. I guess they would rather us hang out in crowded grocery stores than walk alone away from people on a nature trail?

Steely Dan Mar 22, 2020 5:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The North One (Post 8869896)
If this virus has proved anything it's that we are truly a global society.

The truest thing I've heard/read in all of this.

Cities/states/nations are nothing but illusions.

The virus doesn't give a single shit about any of that.

We are ultimately one. Whether we want to be or not.

We don't get to choose that part.

AviationGuy Mar 22, 2020 5:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KevinFromTexas (Post 8869749)

Take-out orders seem to be going better, from what I'm hearing anyway. My favorite Tex Mex restaurant has seen an increase in take-outs every day this week, especially in the evenings. The owner told me today that there were so many people showing up last night that he had to ask them to stay in their cars. I told him that his staff need roller skates now.

photoLith Mar 22, 2020 5:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dave8721 (Post 8869905)
Not happy that they closed the parks in Miami-Dade County. Even Everglades National Park is closed. I heard Marinas were open so I tried to take the kids out to one that has a long walk along the water but nope. They were only letting people in who had business with their boats. They literally had cops in cop cars there to stop anyone who tried to walk in the park. I guess they would rather us hang out in crowded grocery stores than walk alone away from people on a nature trail?

What Everglades NP is closed, why? NY state about a week ago made entrance to all their state parks free. And I regularly go to NY state parks to take photos. The spread of this government overreaction economically destroying virus can’t be spread anyways in state parks and national parks. It’s not going to be spread in bars and such or the closure of office jobs. It’s being spread no matter what in non closed grocery stores and Walmart’s. Every grocery store and Walmart and gas station has touch screen check outs. The virus will be spread with these touch screens. And we’re destroying all of the economy and hundreds of millions of lives over nothing because extremely old people who are the only ones dying from this are still out and about touching touch screens at grocery stores. Yet, we all (millinials etc) have to suffer and lose everything we’ve done, even after the lack of well paying jobs since 2008. Everyone under 35 will be even more fucked after all of this in America after we have all already suffered from lack of any sense of good paying jobs or benefits since 2008-2009.

SIGSEGV Mar 22, 2020 5:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by photoLith (Post 8869935)
What Everglades NP is closed, why? NY state about a week ago made entrance to all their state parks free. And I regularly go to NY state parks to take photos. The spread of this government overreaction economically destroying virus can’t be spread anyways in state parks and national parks.

My recollection of the Everglades is a bunch of crowded boardwalks, but obviously that's probably not the case without many tourists. But there will be nobody to rescue idiots when they get gotten by alligators?

dave8721 Mar 22, 2020 6:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by photoLith (Post 8869935)
What Everglades NP is closed, why? NY state about a week ago made entrance to all their state parks free. And I regularly go to NY state parks to take photos. The spread of this government overreaction economically destroying virus can’t be spread anyways in state parks and national parks. It’s not going to be spread in bars and such or the closure of office jobs. It’s being spread no matter what in non closed grocery stores and Walmart’s. Every grocery store and Walmart and gas station has touch screen check outs. The virus will be spread with these touch screens. And we’re destroying all of the economy and hundreds of millions of lives over nothing because extremely old people who are the only ones dying from this are still out and about touching touch screens at grocery stores. Yet, we all (millinials etc) have to suffer and lose everything we’ve done, even after the lack of well paying jobs since 2008. Everyone under 35 will be even more fucked after all of this in America after we have all already suffered from lack of any sense of good paying jobs or benefits since 2008-2009.

It looks like the national park is still open but the main road in is closed and most of the attractions.

sopas ej Mar 22, 2020 6:39 AM

Lining up to go into the South Pasadena, CA Pavilions, around 8:15am Saturday morning, 3.21.20. They were only letting 5 people in at a time. I bought 2 loaves of bread, 2 bunches of bananas, and one 12-roll pack of toilet paper.
https://scontent-lax3-1.xx.fbcdn.net...80&oe=5E9DB664
Photo by me

710 Freeway headed south near the 10 Freeway interchange, Saturday morning, 3.21.20, around 9:45am. I'm on my way to see my parents, just to visit them for a bit.
https://scontent-lax3-1.xx.fbcdn.net...75&oe=5E9BBA93
Photo by me

sopas ej Mar 22, 2020 7:31 AM

Now that to-go cocktails have been temporarily legalized in California, have any of my fellow Californians ordered a to-go cocktail yet? I have yet to do so myself.

"I'll have a Brandy Alexander in a to-go cup, please. No straw."

To-Go Cocktails Legalized in California
State’s Alcohol Department Relaxes Rules during COVID-19 Outbreak

https://www.independent.com/2020/03/...in-california/

Pedestrian Mar 22, 2020 9:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chris08876 (Post 8869706)
[B]

I went to a few parks with the gf today, and I can tell you this, people DID NOT practice social distancing.

Video Link

jtown,man Mar 22, 2020 1:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10023 (Post 8869670)
It’s Mother’s Day in England tomorrow. I was meant to go visit my mother. I’m not going to.

That is the appropriate course of action. People go in with their lives and avoid elderly relatives, not until there is a vaccine but until there is widespread testing.

Oh come on 10023, you weren't gonna visit your mother anyways lol

chris08876 Mar 22, 2020 3:07 PM

10023 is stone cold. Colder than an addict feels going through opioid WD. Colder than the Polar Vortex.

Just cold man.

Speaking of cold, its 37 F in my part of NJ. Its going to rain next few days, it hasn't rained in a while. Hopefully the rain mitigates the virus. IDK, like on surfaces or something. Maybe the rain will dilute any virus particles on surfaces. :shrug:

mousquet Mar 22, 2020 3:34 PM

If you think you wouldn't be affected because you're aged under 60, beware, though.

Northeastern France has been the most severely hit so far in this country, and nurses over there report about a few odd cases of young people with no particular health condition, yet stuck in resuscitation services. Some in their 20s or 30s may not survive.

That virus is the most vicious thing you could think of. it's double-faced like many of us will go infected without even realizing, while some will die. They can't explain why yet, because it's a brand new disease, so to say.

There you get statistics on the global stage.

https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/

I'll tell you what, if you believe in God, take a little minute to say a prayer for Italy for it's been appalling over there.
They can't even bury their dead in a decent manner any longer. Those losing a love one of theirs can't attend any burial.
Believe it or not, the northern provinces of Italy (that are by far wealthier than the south) would enjoy some of the most modern and efficient hospitals in the world; still, they are completely distressed, overwhelmed by the epidemic.

The situation of northeastern France (especially Alsace) is turning the same, and we're expecting the next couple of weeks to be terrible here.
In Alsace and Corsica, some seriously infected people have to be moved to hospitals of other regions, because theirs are in a shortage of resuscitation beds already.
The Germans are also receiving some sick from Alsace, helping us.

Speaking of Germany, you'll notice their lower death rate. 2 reasons for that.
1 - The 1st case of the virus in Europe was detected in their country a couple of months ago, and they had the very good idea to take it seriously. So they were early in taking some necessary action.
2 - They have 25k resuscitation beds in their country, while mine has only 5k... then sometimes I wonder what the French taxpayer money is used for. Inept and useless bureaucracy, I guess.

Fact is the Germans must be more disciplined and serious than most of us are for real. It sounds like some dumb stereotype, but their lower death rate is a bit of an evidence.

chris08876 Mar 22, 2020 3:43 PM

Press conference at moment. I'll update as it proresses.


https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...de4de2189.jpeg


https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...b3dd5be82.jpeg

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...6bd6449ab.jpeg

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...41c14a966.jpeg

chris08876 Mar 22, 2020 3:46 PM

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...726fc98c9.jpeg

dktshb Mar 22, 2020 5:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mousquet (Post 8870099)
If you think you wouldn't be affected because you're aged under 60, beware, though.

Northeastern France has been the most severely hit so far in this country, and nurses over there report about a few odd cases of young people with no particular health condition, yet stuck in resuscitation services. Some in their 20s or 30s may not survive.

That virus is the most vicious thing you could think of. it's double-faced like many of us will go infected without even realizing, while some will die. They can't explain why yet, because it's a brand new disease, so to say.

There you get statistics on the global stage.

https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/

I'll tell you what, if you believe in God, take a little minute to say a prayer for Italy for it's been appalling over there.
They can't even bury their dead in a decent manner any longer. Those losing a love one of theirs can't attend any burial.
Believe it or not, the northern provinces of Italy (that are by far wealthier than the south) would enjoy some of the most modern and efficient hospitals in the world; still, they are completely distressed, overwhelmed by the epidemic.

The situation of northeastern France (especially Alsace) is turning the same, and we're expecting the next couple of weeks to be terrible here.
In Alsace and Corsica, some seriously infected people have to be moved to hospitals of other regions, because theirs are in a shortage of resuscitation beds already.
The Germans are also receiving some sick from Alsace, helping us.

Speaking of Germany, you'll notice their lower death rate. 2 reasons for that.
1 - The 1st case of the virus in Europe was detected in their country a couple of months ago, and they had the very good idea to take it seriously. So they were early in taking some necessary action.
2 - They have 25k resuscitation beds in their country, while mine has only 5k... then sometimes I wonder what the French taxpayer money is used for. Inept and useless bureaucracy, I guess.

Fact is the Germans must be more disciplined and serious than most of us are for real. It sounds like some dumb stereotype, but their lower death rate is a bit of an evidence.

Yeah, this is getting scarier. I know there is a 12-year-old fighting for her life in Atlanta. In LA 5 young healthy men returning from a ski trip from Italy ended up in the ICU. We're starting to hear now that younger people are getting really sick too.

Pedestrian Mar 22, 2020 6:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sopas ej (Post 8869953)
Lining up to go into the South Pasadena, CA Pavilions, around 8:15am Saturday morning, 3.21.20. They were only letting 5 people in at a time. I bought 2 loaves of bread, 2 bunches of bananas, and one 12-roll pack of toilet paper.

Why would you even go to a large store for that few items? I’ve been revising meals to use what I have and ordering necessities for delivery (either locally via instacart or from sources like Amazon, Walmart.com or Target.com).

iheartthed Mar 22, 2020 6:08 PM

Rate of testing. New York is, by far, testing the most people. New York tests 5,000 people per day, which (last I checked) is more than twice as many as California tests. California is two times the size of New York, btw.

Now, just because California has much fewer confirmed cases DOES NOT mean that California has fewer infections than New York.

dktshb Mar 22, 2020 6:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by photoLith (Post 8869853)
Was in Pittsburgh’s Strip District tonight which is usually packed with people. There were no cars parked on the street, nobody walking around. It was absolutely insane. Would swear we’re living in the post apocalyptic wasteland just waiting for the buildings to rot and collapse. The world is going to be much shittier place after this is all said and done. All of the progress urban centers have made in the past 20 years is going to be erased with most places going out of business because of this overreaction. I still think people above 70 should be quarantined and the rest of us should be allowed to live our lives in order to not destroy the economy for years and ruin hundreds of millions of lives; which this will.

This is not an overreaction. Even young healthy people are ending up in the hospital in large numbers putting a ever increasing burden on things. This virus spreads easily and nobody is immune. Our hospitals are going to be and already are overrun with these measures we're taking. Have you not heard about shortages of protective gear ventilators and beds yet? Do you think keeping business open is going to help the situation?

Steely Dan Mar 22, 2020 6:18 PM

Political bullshit moved to the politics toilet.

sopas ej Mar 22, 2020 6:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pedestrian (Post 8870228)
Why would you even go to a large store for that few items? I’ve been revising meals to use what I have and ordering necessities for delivery (either locally via instacart or from sources like Amazon, Walmart.com or Target.com).

Because I thought I could just run in and out; it was 8am. But I only waited in line for about 10 or 15 minutes. There's a Vons across the street, which didn't have a line to go in, but I was thinking there would be more people INSIDE the store, possibly not practicing social distancing, and their produce usually isn't as good. The bananas at Pavilions are always better than the ones at Vons, for some reason, even though both stores are owned by the same company.

And when I went inside the Pavilions, there were hardly any shoppers inside, so social distancing was possible, and checkout was a breeze---no lines. I don't know what the situation was like as the day went on, though.

sopas ej Mar 22, 2020 6:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by iheartthed (Post 8870234)
Rate of testing. New York is, by far, testing the most people. New York tests 5,000 people per day, which (last I checked) is more than twice as many as California tests. California is two times the size of New York, btw.

Now, just because California has much fewer confirmed cases DOES NOT mean that California has fewer infections than New York.

I thought that was already established; it was always my understanding that the official numbers for people who are infected will go up as more people get tested, and what we really want to see is more testing, and the flattening out of the numbers.

iheartthed Mar 22, 2020 6:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The North One (Post 8869784)
^ What the hell? Literally boarding up shit in Manhattan??? It's really gotten that bad in New York?

Your post is the first I'm hearing about this.

I saw this happening in other cities on TV this morning.

dktshb Mar 22, 2020 6:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by iheartthed (Post 8870234)
Rate of testing. New York is, by far, testing the most people. New York tests 5,000 people per day, which (last I checked) is more than twice as many as California tests. California is two times the size of New York, btw.

Now, just because California has much fewer confirmed cases DOES NOT mean that California has fewer infections than New York.

Yeah, we still appear to be way behind the curve here with testing. Additionally, the City of Los Angeles is only testing those admitted to the hospital according to CNN and not testing anybody else apparently to conserve protective gear. Additionally, LA is a bad example regarding density since it is also a high density city.

sopas ej Mar 22, 2020 6:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dktshb (Post 8870244)
This is not an overreaction. Even young healthy people are ending up in the hospital in large numbers putting a ever increasing burden on things. This virus spreads easily and nobody is immune. Our hospitals are going to be and already are overrun with these measures we're taking. Have you not heard about shortages of protective gear ventilators and beds yet? Do you think keeping business open is going to help the situation?

FOR REALS. It amazes me that there are still some people who are NOT taking this seriously; these are the people who are still in the selfish denial stage, and are talking about this like "It's all just an overreaction that's ruining the economy, all because of the fear of catching a cold."

It's not the same as catching a cold.

These are dire times, like we are at a war, and there are sacrifices we have to make for everyone's well being.

Steely Dan Mar 22, 2020 6:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sopas ej (Post 8870257)
FOR REALS. It amazes me that there are still some people who are NOT taking this seriously; these are the people who are still in the selfish denial stage, and are talking about this like "It's all just an overreaction that's ruining the economy, all because of the fear of catching a cold."

It's not the same as catching a cold.

These are dire times, like we are at a war, and there are sacrifices we have to make for everyone's well being.

So does that mean you're declining Obadno's invitation to the kegger in his backyard tonight?

;)

Pedestrian Mar 22, 2020 6:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mousquet (Post 8870099)
Speaking of Germany, you'll notice their lower death rate. 2 reasons for that.
1 - The 1st case of the virus in Europe was detected in their country a couple of months ago, and they had the very good idea to take it seriously. So they were early in taking some necessary action.
2 - They have 25k resuscitation beds in their country, while mine has only 5k... then sometimes I wonder what the French taxpayer money is used for. Inept and useless bureaucracy, I guess.

Fact is the Germans must be more disciplined and serious than most of us are for real. It sounds like some dumb stereotype, but their lower death rate is a bit of an evidence.

There is bound to be lots of talk about the varying number of acute care and other hospital beds in different nations with criticism for those with fewer.

In fact, before this crisis, fewer beds (as long as it was sufficient to meet needs) was considered a mark of an efficient health care system. Excess bed capacity doesn't come free. Those beds are "staffed" (and I believe I once read that the average hospital employs 3 people for every bed or something like that). So a large bed capacity is expensive and largely unnecessary until some "black swan event" like coronavirus comes along, which NOBODY expected.

In the US, in recent years our bed capacity has been decreasing and those aware of the situation have been congratulating themselves because they saw this as a mark of increasing efficiency in the system, working away on the better known figures about how much more the US spends on health care than the rest of the world. Now, of course, what was seen as an advantage, may turn out to be a problem but you can't really blame other countries for being inept and the Germans for being "serious". 2 months ago the Germans were being critcized for an excess bed capacity and it's not like they were doing it out of some foreknowledge of what was to come. They were just running an inefficient health care system.

Quote:

2007
Capacity Planning in German Hospitals:Excessive Capacities as Result of Inadequate Incentives
Dr. Boris Augurzky, Division chief Labor markets,population and health,
Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung e.V., Germany

Prof. Dr. Ludwig Kuntz,Roman Mennicken
Economic and soci-economic Faculty, Köln University, Germany
Email: mennicken@wiso.uni-koeln.de

Capacity in hospitals is determined by production facilities and production factors (Sibbel 2004). Facilities like beds or departments, needed for the provision of services are predetermined on the federal level by hospital plans. Hence, for hospitals, efficient management of production factors— like physicians and nurses, play the most important part in capacity management and planning.

In Germany, hospitals are facing excess capacities of beds, which are the result of faulty regulatory incentives by hospital plans and the financing system. Since the introduction of DRGs in 2004, hospitals are confronted with a more competitive environment increasing the need for efficient capacity planning and management . . . .

Forecasting Hospital Demand
Hospitals have to take into account several external developments when planning their supply (e.g. beds, personnel, operating rooms). The most important ones are
• local demographic change,
• technical progress, and
• regulatory changes.

Since hospital business is primarily a local, demand for hospital services is strongly determined by the local demographic structure. Management has to forecast demand – sometimes even for each DRG. If possible, expected regulatory changes have to be taken into consideration. In Germany, the legislator encourages a shift towards outpatient treatment. This means that, for some DRGS, the number of inpatient cases might decrease, even though the total number of cases will increase. Inpatient and outpatient capacities have to be planned accordingly. The following figure shows a forecast of the growth in the number of cases by 2020 taking into account local demographic changes, a shift towards outpatient treatment, and steady technical progress (Augurzky et al. 2007).

Conclusion
Capacity planning plays an important role for hospital management. So far, great emphasis in Germany is put on the efficient utilisation of capacities, since beds and departments are mostly predetermined. However, it is quite likely that in the near future regulations in many federal states will be reduced. Hospitals will then have more managerial freedom to plan their capacities according to their product portfolio.

bigstick Mar 22, 2020 6:58 PM

600 cases in Georgia, with majority around Greater ATL, 23 deaths as of today...

iheartthed Mar 22, 2020 7:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bigstick (Post 8870291)
600 cases in Georgia, with majority around Greater ATL, 23 deaths as of today...

I suspect Georgia and Louisiana are drastically undercounted. Georgia has more deaths than New Jersey (20 NJ vs 23 GA), while (supposedly) having just 1/3 the number of infections as of right now (1,917 vs 600).

bigstick Mar 22, 2020 7:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by iheartthed (Post 8870297)
I suspect Georgia and Louisiana are drastically undercounted. Georgia has more deaths than New Jersey (20 NJ vs 23 GA), while (supposedly) having just 1/3 the number of infections as of right now (1,917 vs 600).

I agree....

SteveD Mar 22, 2020 7:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by iheartthed (Post 8870297)
I suspect Georgia and Louisiana are drastically undercounted. Georgia has more deaths than New Jersey (20 NJ vs 23 GA), while (supposedly) having just 1/3 the number of infections as of right now (1,917 vs 600).

I agree. Reports of and photographic evidence of many in town predominantly black churches full this morning....astounding and disheartening to see. I took a 4 mile walk this morning from my in town house and walked past several churches with full parking lots. :(

Steely Dan Mar 22, 2020 7:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SteveD (Post 8870305)
I agree. Reports of and photographic evidence of many in town predominantly black churches full this morning....astounding and disheartening to see. I took a 4 mile walk this morning from my in town house and walked past several churches with full parking lots. :(

Very odd behavior.

The archdiocese of Chicago has cancelled all masses and other church gatherings through Easter, at least.

When the Catholic Church cancels Easter, you know the shit is real.

Buckeye Native 001 Mar 22, 2020 7:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steely Dan (Post 8870310)
Very odd behavior.

The archdiocese of Chicago has cancelled all masses and other church gatherings through Easter, at least.

When the Catholic Church cancels Easter, you know the shit is real.

Someone on Twitter said that Catholics are now Lutherans... ;)

Pedestrian Mar 22, 2020 7:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steely Dan (Post 8870310)
Very odd behavior.

The archdiocese of Chicago has cancelled all masses and other church gatherings through Easter, at least.

When the Catholic Church cancels Easter, you know the shit is real.

It's the difference between those with genuine faith (that God will protect them) and those who pay lip service to religion (usually members of one of the mainstream religions).

iheartthed Mar 22, 2020 7:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SteveD (Post 8870305)
I agree. Reports of and photographic evidence of many in town predominantly black churches full this morning....astounding and disheartening to see. I took a 4 mile walk this morning from my in town house and walked past several churches with full parking lots. :(

It's mind-boggling that there isn't more emphasis put on churches. We've already seen in South Korea how churches can be the epicenter of a major outbreak. I think something like half of that country's cases were tied back to a single church.

Not to make this political, but there is clearly a tendency to downplay the virus in right-leaning states, and that has led to mixed responses to halt the spread at the local level. I think when it's all said and done the worst places will end up being those states. If we're still locked down in June or July, it will be because of states that are not taking it seriously right now.

Steely Dan Mar 22, 2020 7:26 PM

The dominoes are falling.

Ohio just became the 6th state to go full "stay at home".

Coming soon to a state near you (if you ain't there already).

bigstick Mar 22, 2020 7:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steely Dan (Post 8870320)
The dominoes are falling.

Ohio just became the 6th state to go full "stay at home".

Coming soon to a state near you (if you ain't there already).

Every state in this country needs to do this so we can "flatten" the curve...:hell:

BnaBreaker Mar 22, 2020 7:55 PM

I don't understand why people are surprised to hear about young people getting serious cases of this. The chance of a serious case for the young and healthy was always said to be relatively low, but not non-existent. Even with a 0.1% chance of a severe case for young people they are going to happen.

JManc Mar 22, 2020 7:58 PM

Louisiana just shut down.

SIGSEGV Mar 22, 2020 8:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JManc (Post 8870349)
Louisiana just shut down.

Good, I bet Mardi Gras was a virusfest.

Buckeye Native 001 Mar 22, 2020 8:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BnaBreaker (Post 8870345)
I don't understand why people are surprised to hear about young people getting serious cases of this. The chance of a serious case for the young and healthy was always said to be relatively low, but not non-existent. Even with a 0.1% chance of a severe case for young people they are going to happen.

Some people here keep trying to dismiss this as something that only affects the elderly and immunocompromised.

Tom In Chicago Mar 22, 2020 8:23 PM

I see they're boarding up storefronts on Michigan Avenue here in Chicago for what I can only assume is going to be a prolonged period of closure due to the pandemic. . .

. . .

Emprise du Lion Mar 22, 2020 8:40 PM

Missouri is lagging behind everyone else because Governor Parsons has decided to leave most decisions up to the municipalities. That being said, a social distancing order is going into place statewide tomorrow for the next two weeks. No dining at restaurants, schools closed during the same time span, no groups of 10 or more.

Meanwhile in St. Louis, the city and county (some 1.3 million Missourians) are being ordered to shelter in place for a month starting tomorrow. It's similar to the order currently in place in Illinois, but it gives more exemptions than Illinois did, which isn't exactly helpful.

So here we are. The majority of the metro will be sheltering in place due to the city and county's joint order and the current order in Illinois, but Missouri counties such as St. Charles, Jefferson, etc, haven't followed up with their own directives.

Pedestrian Mar 22, 2020 8:53 PM

Quote:

German Chancellor Angela Merkel has gone into quarantine after being treated by a doctor who later was found to have the coronavirus.
https://seekingalpha.com/premium-news/all

Northern Light Mar 22, 2020 8:57 PM

With 2/3 of Toronto (easily) shut down......

One Toronto neighbourhood, that has a number of healthcare professionals decided to do a tribute concert, every Saturday though the shutdown period.

Of course neighbours are all listening from their porch/yard, as another neighbour sings.

https://twitter.com/i/status/1241580018070892544

Northern Light Mar 22, 2020 8:59 PM

And now for some high-price real estate humour: While this is about Canada's big cities, feel free to imagine it applies to your neck of the woods.

https://www.thebeaverton.com/2017/08...-afford-house/

Pedestrian Mar 22, 2020 9:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Northern Light (Post 8870413)
With 2/3 of Toronto (easily) shut down......

One Toronto neighbourhood, that has a number of healthcare professionals decided to do a tribute concert, every Saturday though the shutdown period.

Of course neighbours are all listening from their porch/yard, as another neighbour sings.

https://twitter.com/i/status/1241580018070892544

Video Link

KevinFromTexas Mar 22, 2020 9:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mousquet (Post 8870099)
If you think you wouldn't be affected because you're aged under 60, beware, though.

Northeastern France has been the most severely hit so far in this country, and nurses over there report about a few odd cases of young people with no particular health condition, yet stuck in resuscitation services. Some in their 20s or 30s may not survive.

That virus is the most vicious thing you could think of. it's double-faced like many of us will go infected without even realizing, while some will die. They can't explain why yet, because it's a brand new disease, so to say.

There you get statistics on the global stage.

https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/

I'll tell you what, if you believe in God, take a little minute to say a prayer for Italy for it's been appalling over there.
They can't even bury their dead in a decent manner any longer. Those losing a love one of theirs can't attend any burial.
Believe it or not, the northern provinces of Italy (that are by far wealthier than the south) would enjoy some of the most modern and efficient hospitals in the world; still, they are completely distressed, overwhelmed by the epidemic.

The situation of northeastern France (especially Alsace) is turning the same, and we're expecting the next couple of weeks to be terrible here.
In Alsace and Corsica, some seriously infected people have to be moved to hospitals of other regions, because theirs are in a shortage of resuscitation beds already.
The Germans are also receiving some sick from Alsace, helping us.

Speaking of Germany, you'll notice their lower death rate. 2 reasons for that.
1 - The 1st case of the virus in Europe was detected in their country a couple of months ago, and they had the very good idea to take it seriously. So they were early in taking some necessary action.
2 - They have 25k resuscitation beds in their country, while mine has only 5k... then sometimes I wonder what the French taxpayer money is used for. Inept and useless bureaucracy, I guess.

Fact is the Germans must be more disciplined and serious than most of us are for real. It sounds like some dumb stereotype, but their lower death rate is a bit of an evidence.

Quote:

Originally Posted by dktshb (Post 8870175)
Yeah, this is getting scarier. I know there is a 12-year-old fighting for her life in Atlanta. In LA 5 young healthy men returning from a ski trip from Italy ended up in the ICU. We're starting to hear now that younger people are getting really sick too.

Yep. I've already read about 3 year olds and 10 year olds getting it here in Texas. And then there are the cases of "young" people getting it. Like the 42 year old mother of 6 who had beat stage 4 breast cancer and then died of Covid-19. There's also this story below. Some of these younger people are dying within a week of first showing symptoms.

https://nypost.com/2020/03/22/39-yea...-test-results/
Quote:

Healthy 39-year-old woman dies waiting for coronavirus test results

By Lee BrownMarch 22, 2020 | 1:09pm

A healthy 39-year-old social worker died days after initially turning down a coronavirus test because she was told she was “low risk,” her boyfriend said in a heartbreaking Facebook post.

Josh Anderson says he found girlfriend Natasha Ott dead in her apartment in New Orleans on Friday as she still awaited news on whether her sickness and fever were actually COVID-19.

He said Ott — who helped people who are HIV-positive — had first told him on March 10 that she had a “respiratory cold” and “tiny fever.”

Her own clinic only had five test kits available, he said, saying she told him, “I declined to take one so someone else could.”

After her condition deteriorated, she finally got tested on March 16 — almost a week after first falling sick — but was told the results would take at least five days, with a further delay meaning they are still not ready, he said.

Pedestrian Mar 22, 2020 9:25 PM

^^News reports like this I find disgusting. People who are sick--really sick--should call the local ER about how to get seen and then do it. An attempt at self-diagnosis by getting some test is an absurd thing to do. How is anyone supposed to respond to the complaint "I can't breathe so I need a coronavirus test but if it's negative I'l just let myself die".

It really doesn't matter whether this woman had coronavirus or not as far as what her response should have been which is precisely why the need for these tests in the general community is way overhyped.

If you are sick, get medical care just as you always would have. The only extra step most healthcare professionals might want you to take is to call before coming to a general ER or doctor's office because many places are now trying to triage patients with possible COVID-19 in a separate location so as not to spread the disease.

iheartthed Mar 22, 2020 10:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pedestrian (Post 8870434)
^^News reports like this I find disgusting. People who are sick--really sick--should call the local ER about how to get seen and then do it. An attempt at self-diagnosis by getting some test is an absurd thing to do. How is anyone supposed to respond to the complaint "I can't breathe so I need a coronavirus test but if it's negative I'l just let myself die".

It really doesn't matter whether this woman had coronavirus or not as far as what her response should have been which is precisely why the need for these tests in the general community is way overhyped.

If you are sick, get medical care just as you always would have. The only extra step most healthcare professionals might want you to take is to call before coming to a general ER or doctor's office because many places are now trying to triage patients with possible COVID-19 in a separate location so as not to spread the disease.

You should read up on West Virginia's first case. They lost the man's test and his wife almost had to take him to Virginia to get tested. At the same time the hospitals wouldn't admit him out of fear he was infected. This happened at the same time the president was congratulating WV's governor for not having any cases, as if that's a thing that was ever under his control.

https://www.cnn.com/2020/03/21/us/we...est/index.html

I'll bet you that West Virginia ends up being one of the hardest hit places when this is all said and done.

Pedestrian Mar 22, 2020 10:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by iheartthed (Post 8870460)
You should read up on West Virginia's first case. They lost the man's test and his wife almost had to take him to Virginia to get tested. At the same time the hospitals wouldn't admit him out of fear he was infected. This happened at the same time the president was congratulating WV's governor for not having any cases, as if that's a thing that was ever under his control.

https://www.cnn.com/2020/03/21/us/we...est/index.html

I'll bet you that West Virginia ends up being one of the hardest hit places when this is all said and done.

He didn't need to be just tested no matter the details if he was quite ill. Testing is helpful to tell those who are feeling just a bit "under the weather" or even those feeling well but thinking they were exposed (after the necessary wait of about 5 days) whether they are infected and need to self-quarantine, but those who are quite ill need medical care regardless of any coronavirus test result.

If hospitals wouldn't see a very sick person, regardless of what was making him sick, that's awful. He should get a lawyer and sue the pants off them.

What's necessary is what I suggested above and some hospitals are doing: Setting up separate facilities (in tents if necessary) to screen those with possible coronavirus symptoms in a separate location from people with all manner of other medical problems. And for those who, when screened (including a test, preferably the new bedside test now coming only, not the PCR test everybody wants), do need hospitalization, there needs to be separate facilties for those with coronavirus and the rest. Sokme places are doing this. If West Virginia isn't, that's a problem.

I read the article and find nothing surprising in it. Whether and what medical care the guy needed shouldn't have been up to a test. It should have been based on his medical condition with the test used to determine where he got care, not whether. And we all should know there are probably hundreds of thousands, maybe millions, of people who have contracted coronavirus out there but haven't had it confirmed with a test. If they are critical workers--cops, firemen, medical people--and they feel well, they need testing to see if they can work. The rest should just stay home and self-isolate.


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