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Pedestrian Mar 11, 2020 8:51 PM

Quote:

SF to ban large gatherings, including barring fans from Warriors games, to curb coronavirus

Dominic Fracassa
March 11, 2020 Updated: March 11, 2020 12:47 p.m.

San Francisco Mayor London Breed and city health officials will issue a directive Wednesday canceling all gatherings that draw large crowds — including Golden State Warriors games — to help protect against the spread of the new coronavirus.

City health officials will issue an order Wednesday formally prohibiting public gatherings of 1,000 or more people. The order will go into effect within the next 24 hours — the city has to provide direct notification to venues — and will last for at least two weeks . . . .

Through March 21, the following events at Chase Center would be impacted by the public-gathering ban:

• Friday, March 13 - Tame Impala concert (postponed)

• Saturday, March 14 - Santa Cruz Warriors vs. Austin Spurs (moved to Santa Cruz; game will also be played without fans)

• Thursday, March 19 - Post Malone concert (canceled or postponed — TBD)

• Saturday, March 21 - Bell Biv Devoe & Friends concert (postponed)

The San Francisco Giants also announced Wednesday they will not host the Oakland A’s in an exhibition game at Oracle Park previously scheduled for March 24.


https://www.sfchronicle.com/bayarea/...s-15123312.php

Pedestrian Mar 11, 2020 8:57 PM

Quote:

Coronavirus aid: SF seeks to help renters, workers, small businesses devastated by outbreak
Photo of Roland Li
Roland Li March 10, 2020 Updated: March 10, 2020 9:14 p.m.

San Francisco officials are seeking to help renters, small businesses and workers hurt by the coronavirus outbreak that’s damaging the local economy.

Supervisors announced legislation Tuesday that would ban residential evictions for nonpayment of rent due to loss of income from the new coronavirus. They also are proposing legislation to create a fund that would help small businesses suffering from the outbreak pay their rent. Details and exact dollar amounts aren’t finalized.

Other city proposals include a new type of paid leave during public health emergencies for residents and potentially new funds for workers who were laid off or furloughed. A nonbinding resolution urging banks to suspend foreclosures and fees and utilities to stop assessing penalties is also being drafted. Supervisors Dean Preston, Hillary Ronen, Matt Haney and Ahsha Safaí are sponsoring the measures . . . .
https://www.sfchronicle.com/bayarea/...s-15121448.php

Steely Dan Mar 11, 2020 9:44 PM

in the worst news in all of this CV BS, all of chicago's various st. paddy's day parades and other festivities, including the famous river dyeing, have now been cancelled for this weekend.


guess i'm just gonna have to get drunk at home by myself saturday morning. :(


worst. timing. ever.




as we're accustomed to saying in chicago, "wait 'til next year", i guess:

https://cdn.vox-cdn.com/thumbor/9Wg7...1489763683.jpg
source: https://chicago.curbed.com/2017/3/17...me-lapse-video

suburbanite Mar 11, 2020 9:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steely Dan (Post 8858458)
in the worst news in all of this CV BS, all of chicago's various st. paddy's day parades and other festivities, including the famous river dyeing, have now been cancelled for this weekend.


guess i'm just gonna have to get drunk at home by myself saturday morning. :(


worst. timing. ever.




as we're accustomed to saying in chicago, "wait 'til next year", i guess:

I was supposed to go to Chicago for St. Paddy's this weekend but had stuff come up. Hopefully next year when this thing has blown over.

Obadno Mar 11, 2020 10:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bilbao58 (Post 8858371)
So many younger people don't seem to understand that just by getting the virus, whether they get sick or not, in fact especially if they don't get sick, they are facilitating its further spread. They also don't get that they may not even know they're infected, but Granny will know it when they visit her and she dies 3 weeks later.

not to mention even for young people it is much deadlier than a flu, obviously both are very unlikely to kill a young person but it is possible, the COVID19 is much more likely than almost any other illness a young person can get.

Not to mention even if you dont die you can be in SERIOUS condition, they have people on full ventilators this isnt a joke, if you end up ventilated even as a 24 year old you will probably have permanent lung damage.

LosAngelesSportsFan Mar 11, 2020 10:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steely Dan (Post 8858348)
^ yeah, the cruise industry is in for one hell of a beat-down.

who the fuck is ever gonna wanna take a cruise again after this shit?

you couldn't pay me to get on one of those floating petri dishes.

and i highly doubt i'm the only one thinking that way.

The reason I never have and most certainly never will now

NYCLuver Mar 11, 2020 11:43 PM

So the entire State University of New York and City University of New York (Both are multiples colleges around NY State and City) have now moved to online classes starting March 19th. Classes are excused the next 5 days to get ready for the transition.

However, resources and such are still going to stay open, the library, research labs, etc. :rolleyes::runaway:

10023 Mar 11, 2020 11:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LosAngelesSportsFan (Post 8858556)
The reason I never have and most certainly never will now

To borrow an old naval joke, they’re prisons with a chance of drowning. Or catching something.

Steely Dan Mar 12, 2020 2:20 AM

The NBA and NHL are both suspending their seasons.

And March madness will be played in empty arenas.

We're in unchartered territory here, at least for anyone currently alive.

Shit is getting real.

Pedestrian Mar 12, 2020 2:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steely Dan (Post 8858786)
Shit is getting real.

They are embargoing tomatoes and mozzarella.









:justkidding:

Darkoshvilli Mar 12, 2020 3:14 AM

Montreal has cancelled the world figure skating championship.

craigs Mar 12, 2020 5:42 AM

Apparently downtown San Francisco is a ghost town (I am taking time off so I don't have to go downtown), and BART ridership is off 25%. I'd bet Muni ridership is also down--all my neighbors were home today, going on how I could see everyone in their pajamas working at their kitchen tables. I will say, though, that I'm going to need to purchase an ergonomic chair if I'm going to work from home.

Pedestrian Mar 12, 2020 6:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by craigs (Post 8859031)
Apparently downtown San Francisco is a ghost town (I am taking time off so I don't have to go downtown), and BART ridership is off 25%. I'd bet Muni ridership is also down--all my neighbors were home today, going on how I could see everyone in their pajamas working at their kitchen tables. I will say, though, that I'm going to need to purchase an ergonomic chair if I'm going to work from home.

How do you see what people are wearing at their kitchen tables? I don’t have a kitchen table but now I’ll have to stop leaving the bedroom without dressing (or can you see in there too?)

10023 Mar 12, 2020 7:27 AM

So when is maximum panic? And when does it become a buying opportunity?

craigs Mar 12, 2020 7:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pedestrian (Post 8859059)
How do you see what people are wearing at their kitchen tables? I don’t have a kitchen table but now I’ll have to stop leaving the bedroom without dressing (or can you see in there too?)

I live in a Victorian and Edwardian neighborhood. All our kitchens and living rooms have big, front-facing bay windows. I realize this is not your own experience living in a shitty modern mid-rise complex on Van Ness.

Pedestrian Mar 12, 2020 8:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by craigs (Post 8859079)
I live in a Victorian and Edwardian neighborhood. All our kitchens and living rooms have big, front-facing bay windows. I realize this is not your own experience living in a shitty modern mid-rise complex on Van Ness.

The kitchens in your "Victorian and Edwardians" are in the front of the homes or are you sneaking around other people's backyards peeping at them in their PJs? Seems odd because in the older homes I've been in the kitchens tend to be toward the rear.

Pedestrian Mar 12, 2020 9:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10023 (Post 8859078)
So when is maximum panic? And when does it become a buying opportunity?

REALLY wish I could answer that. Every day I think it has to be about as bad as it can get. Not that the epidemic is as bad--that's clearly going to get worse. But that the fear in financial centers of what it's doing to the economy is as bad as that's likely to get. And every day I'm wrong. I mean it seems to me people should have known some time ago that cruise ships were going to get tied to their piers, lots of airliners are going to be sitting in the CA and AZ deserts for a while, eventually Disneylands are probably going to shutter for at least a few weeks and hotels around the world are going to have a lot of empty rooms. If they didn't know that on Wall Street, they were kidding themselves and deserve to be fired.

But here's the thing: Things are happening that aren't supposed to happen. Precious metals, and especially their mining shares, are falling along with everything else. Treasury bonds fell yesterday along with stocks (and longer rates climbed). Stocks of companies little affected by coronavirus--some even perhaps helped by it like some drug stocks--fell as much as the things that clearly are.

The only logical explanations seem to me to be: (1) selling of index funds that hold a diverse portfolio of "good" and "bad" stocks, (2) liquidation of things like bonds and gold to meet margin calls or other liquidity problems, (3) panic selling by retail investors ("get me out of everything"), (4) selling what you can and not what you'd prefer to.

These are things that happen near bottoms I believe. But I've believed it basically since Monday or even late last week. Even trading tiny numbers of options contracts I've had trouble with very wide bid/ask spreads and sometimes no bids at all. Again more evidence of market dysfunction and panic.

So we'll see. I strongly believe there are lots of buying opportunities NOW if your horizon is 12 months or more. I think by fall the epidemic will be under control and social interaction will be normalizing if not normal. The question is how much damage will have been done to the economy and how fast will it recover and that I feel uncomfortable about. Remember that the stock market is supposed to anticipate economic events (and even though the black swan of a sudden epidemic has clearly blindsided it, the market should start recovering before Mainstreet does). If you believe their numbers, the Chinese experience is certainly encouraging (I don't believe their numbers). Even if our efforts to contain the virus aren't as effective as theirs, it will burn itself out because large swaths of the public will have had it and be immune (with 1% or so dead in the likely worst case). And historically it seems like booms have followed great disasters.

So I am buying now--mostly call options I can roll down if the underlying shares keep falling.

Pedestrian Mar 12, 2020 9:22 AM

^^

We may--just may--have another 3000 points on the Dow to go:

https://ei.marketwatch.com/Multimedi...5-9c8e992d421e
https://www.marketwatch.com/story/he...S%3D1584004597

Pedestrian Mar 12, 2020 9:35 AM

^^

Quote:

In a Wednesday note, UBS attempted to address a number of scenarios, Here are excerpts from the bank’s thinking:

UBS revising…everything
In the bank’s new baseline, it expects “global growth in 2020 to fall to 2.3% (was 2.9%) and eight countries to enter recession.”

“However, we also consider two further escalation steps: an intermediate scenario where infections increase by a factor 1000 and a full pandemic scenario. In the former, global growth falls to 1.6%[year over year] (16 out of 28 countries in recession) and in the pandemic scenario to 0.8% (18/28 in recession).”

Monetary and fiscal stimulus on the way?
The Federal Reserve last week cut its fed-funds rate by a half a percentage point to a 1%-1.25% range and is scheduled to meet on March 17-18, where it’s expected to discuss further rolling back rates. On Wednesday, the Bank of England lowered its key rates as well, as investors expect a spate of policy measures from global central banks to help curtail the negative effects of slowdowns to business activity, amid the efforts to contain and/or mitigate the viral outbreak.

UBS is forecasting the Fed to “go to the zero lower bound in the next two meetings,” which could mean the fed-funds hits 0% over the next few months.

Market participants have reacted poorly to monetary policy measures alone because specialists believe a coordinated effort is key to helping mitigate the economic impact to global economies and supply chains.

As for fiscal measures, UBS is expecting more efforts from the international community, including China. “We have also tallied up all the fiscal announcements and now expect roughly 80bp (% global GDP) of additional global fiscal stimulus (>50% China; 15% Eurozone), which would make this the most expansionary year since 2009,” the economists wrote.

“It will help the recovery to trend starting in the second half of the year, and we expect a full recovery to trend growth in 2021, with only limited permanent global output loss (50-80bp),” they said.

What’s priced in
The bank is forecasting 2% global growth, which they describe as bad, but add that “it could be worse.”

“Our estimates suggest the market is pricing in global growth at only 2% (in line with our forecast), compared with a long-term average of 3.5%, 4% prior to Covid-19 worries and 2.8% before OPEC+ broke down,” UBS says, referring to the unraveling of talks between major global crude producers in the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries and its allies, led by Russia. The alliance broke down spectacularly last week, resulting in a stunning collapse of crude-oil prices US:CL00 as Saudi Arabia said they would ratchet up output of crude after a three-year agreement concludes at the end of the month.

“The quick ‘double shock’ has meant that this has been the sharpest eight-week decline in growth expectations since the [global financial crisis in 2008],” the researchers wrote.

Stock-market outlook
UBS estimates that stocks could shed 5% or 20% in an intermediate or pandemic scenario. That said, the firm believes that the continued rise of cases and deaths from the novel coronavirus likely means that assets perceived as risky could be vulnerable to even more substantial falls.

“If the virus can be contained, global equities should make new stimulus-powered highs by end-2020. North Asia and the U.S. will likely lead gains, while Europe and the rest of [emerging markets] lag,” [seems incredibly optimistic to me now] the analysts wrote.

Even with a rebound for asset prices in the last six months of the year, UBS predicts that stocks will end the year in negative territory.

Through Tuesday, the Dow was off 16% so far this year, the S&P 500 down more than 14%, and the Nasdaq Composite was down more than 10%. The Stoxx Europe 600 index XX:SXXP is off nearly 20% in 2020, and the Italian benchmark, FTSE MIB Index IT:I945, the country in Europe that has been the hardest hit by the outbreak, is off about 24%. In Asia, the Shanghai Composite CN:SHCOMP is down by a less severe 2.7%, according to FactSet data.

“In the intermediate scenario,we still see a recovery in [second half], but not enough to keep returns positive for the year. The pandemic scenario sees a major step lower in returns as growth slips with little additional stimulus at policy makers’ disposal.
https://www.marketwatch.com/story/he...S%3D1584005042

I am buying some stocks with anticipation of gains not so much in 2020 (except in the case of a few issues that might do well even in a pandemic) but in 2021 so I am buying options expiring in Jan 2022.

mrnyc Mar 12, 2020 1:24 PM

our financial advisor says for aggregated stocks like blackrock or whatever you have the relatively safe way to go is buy now and then monitor and buy in like 10% more week by week.

also, assuming the russians will capitulate on their oil deal walkout soon enough. we know they are at war with the usa and trying to destroy the local shale oil business here, but too much $ is on the table for them to keep fooling around with that.

10023 Mar 12, 2020 1:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bilbao58 (Post 8858371)
So many younger people don't seem to understand that just by getting the virus, whether they get sick or not, in fact especially if they don't get sick, they are facilitating its further spread. They also don't get that they may not even know they're infected, but Granny will know it when they visit her and she dies 3 weeks later.

That is why you don’t visit granny. And old people stay home from work.

10023 Mar 12, 2020 1:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mhays (Post 8858260)
That wouldn't be enough. The vulnerable old lady's niece will visit twice a week, and bring it with her because she's been in public.

Reduced gatherings and "social distance" are about making sure the niece is less likely to get it and carry it to the old lady.

It's also about slowing the spread so that the health system and maybe a vaccine can catch up before it gets too big.

The problem is not the niece being in public, it’s visiting the vulnerable old lady. Tell people not to visit older relatives. Nursing and assisted living homes should be banning visitors as well.


Quote:

Originally Posted by JManc (Post 8858271)
What they're also saying is that you can be young and healthy enough to lick the toilet seat in an airport bathroom and be fine but you can still pass something on to anyone older or immunocompromised. There's a reason why they're shutting down schools and universities...

Then stay away from anyone older. Or rather, older people stay away from the young. Stay home.


What is so hard to understand? You can lock down a whole country, destroy the economy and impoverish everyone. Or you can tell the elderly and vulnerable (most of whom are not working anyway) to stay home and avoid public places and younger people (including relatives), and get through this with much more modest disruption.

bossabreezes Mar 12, 2020 1:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by craigs (Post 8859079)
I live in a Victorian and Edwardian neighborhood. All our kitchens and living rooms have big, front-facing bay windows. I realize this is not your own experience living in a shitty modern mid-rise complex on Van Ness.

Does coronavirus cause aggression too? :haha:

hauntedheadnc Mar 12, 2020 2:19 PM

There are now 12 confirmed cases in North Carolina, in Wake, Durham, Johnston, and Forsyth counties. At the Charlotte Observer, staff has been informed of a possible exposure in the newsroom. If so, that would mean there are active cases in some of the state's most urban counties, home to Raleigh, Durham, Winston-Salem, and Charlotte. Statewide, the University of North Carolina system has suspended in-class instruction. That would include local universities here such as Western Carolina, Appalachian State, and UNC-Asheville. Not sure if that's true for the community college system also. Meanwhile, North Carolina has declared a state of emergency which has triggered the price gouging law. Some stores like Lowe's are limiting purchases to keep people from panic buying.

Here at home, the president's speech last night caused quite a tizzy at one of the hospitals where my husband is doing his clinicals. Patients are cancelling their mental health appointments, the hospital took the batteries out of most of the hand sanitizer dispensers because they can't get refills, and a lot of the staff was talking about going out for supply runs on their lunch breaks. One had already been to Sam's Club before coming in, and reported it to be mobbed. Hand sanitizer is sold out, and toilet paper is getting hard to find. I reassured my husband that I have enough Subway napkins stuffed in my glove box to wipe every ass within a three-hour drive so we're all set for the lean times.

Also, this morning the Tourism Development Authority in Asheville announced they're starting to see large numbers of people cancel their hotel and bed-and-breakfast reservations. Personally, I stopped in at my favorite coffee shop this morning, and the owner told me business is dropping off. Local news is also reporting that nearly every local festival, and galas and luncheon fundraisers for local nonprofits, have been suspended or canceled, while Asheville City and Buncombe County Schools have suspended or canceled a total of thirty-eight out-of-state field trips that had been scheduled.

Edit: God bless the rumor mill. This just showed up on a twitter feed about Asheville news:

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/ES3cr5yU...jpg&name=small

C. Mar 12, 2020 2:37 PM

YIMBY movement attracts strange bedfellows...

C. Mar 12, 2020 2:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by C. (Post 8859252)
YIMBY movement attracts strange bedfellows...

Wait... wrong thread.

destroycreate Mar 12, 2020 2:40 PM

I work in Advertising and am petrified I will loose my job again. I just started my new job 3 weeks ago and it's been going great, love my team, the culture, everything. But suddenly we are hearing brands we work with can't get product from China, and they have to slash their marketing budgets.

Yesterday, we were all instructed to begin WFH indefinitely (which I guess is good, but doesn't feel reassuring outlook-wise).

JManc Mar 12, 2020 2:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10023 (Post 8859193)
The problem is not the niece being in public, it’s visiting the vulnerable old lady. Tell people not to visit older relatives. Nursing and assisted living homes should be banning visitors as well.



Then stay away from anyone older. Or rather, older people stay away from the young. Stay home.


What is so hard to understand? You can lock down a whole country, destroy the economy and impoverish everyone. Or you can tell the elderly and vulnerable (most of whom are not working anyway) to stay home and avoid public places and younger people (including relatives), and get through this with much more modest disruption.

The 'social distancing' mode sounds like the only way to keep this thing at bay; look at China. Merely telling the 70's and above or those with illness to stay home while the rest of us goes on with life probably isn't going to cut it .

And it's too late, the world economy is already fucked.

subterranean Mar 12, 2020 3:06 PM

James Howard Kunstler has been predicting the shale oil collapse for yearssss due to its very narrow price vs. finance requirements. I honestly don't think it would take much to collapse, which is why we are hearing the president talk about a stimulus.

Which is funny, bc, you know, about ten years ago the narrative from that side of the aisle was to let businesses fail.

Pedestrian Mar 12, 2020 3:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mrnyc (Post 8859174)
our financial advisor says for aggregated stocks like blackrock or whatever you have the relatively safe way to go is buy now and then monitor and buy in like 10% more week by week.

also, assuming the russians will capitulate on their oil deal walkout soon enough. we know they are at war with the usa and trying to destroy the local shale oil business here, but too much $ is on the table for them to keep fooling around with that.

Interesting article in one of the Dow Jones publications the other day (can’t remember whether the WSJ or Barron’s): basically they pointed out that the Russian plan to get rid of US shale production can’t work because even if they bankrupt the existing companies, the oil and technology will remain and private equity or somebody will pick up the assets for pennies on the dollar and resume production.

Pedestrian Mar 12, 2020 3:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JManc (Post 8859268)
The 'social distancing' mode sounds like the only way to keep this thing at bay; look at China. Merely telling the 70's and above or those with illness to stay home while the rest of us goes on with life probably isn't going to cut it .

And it's too late, the world economy is already fucked.

I’ll keep saying we don’t know what’s happening in China as far as the virus goes. We know things appear to be returning to normal because the government is sounding the all clear signal. But consider what America would look like if the government and media just went silent on the subject and began saying, “Just forget it—everything’s OK”. All would quickly seem normal but the spread of the virus wouldn’t change.

Do you know anyone who’s sick with diagnosed COVID? I don’t. If I junked the TV and stopped reading the paper or if they started telling me something different, I wouldn’t know there was a problem.

JManc Mar 12, 2020 3:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pedestrian (Post 8859328)
I’ll keep saying we don’t know what’s happening in China as far as the virus goes. We know things appear to be returning to normal because the government is sounding the all clear signal. But consider what America would look like if the government and media just went silent on the subject and began saying, “Just forget it—everything’s OK”. All would quickly seem normal but the spread of the virus wouldn’t change.

Do you know anyone who’s sick with diagnosed COVID? I don’t. If I junked the TV and stopped reading the paper or if they started telling me something different, I wouldn’t know there was a problem.

Four of my father's friends were on that cruise ship off Japan. Of course most of us won't know anyone directly impacted; it's 1200-1300 people out of 320 million. In total, about 130,000 have been infected globally.

sopas ej Mar 12, 2020 3:34 PM

I just learned yesterday that the LA Times Festival of Books, an event we go to every year, was postponed to October, because of COVID-19; it's usually held in April. It's a huge event. They have great author and guest speakers, among other things. Over the years, we've seen speakers like Barbara Eden, Tippi Hedren, and one year Billy Idol spoke about his autobiography, and did an impromptu concert.

And this hits home for me; it really doesn't make sense. According to the article, people are avoiding Chinese restaurants, yet business is up at 99 Ranch and 168 Market because supposedly more people are shopping and eating at home. But uh, you can just as easily get the virus shopping at 99 Ranch or any other Asian market as you can eating at a Chinese restaurant? :haha:

From Eater Los Angeles:

Coronavirus Concerns Shut Down Three SGV Restaurants, Others Suffer Plummeting Sales

Drops in business are estimated between 30 to 75 percent, according to dozens of Chinese restaurant owners


by Kristie Hang Mar 11, 2020, 12:16pm PDT

https://cdn.vox-cdn.com/thumbor/Ng3A..._gabriel.7.jpg
Strip mall with restaurants in San Gabriel, California Shutterstock/Feng Cheng

Asian restaurants, especially Chinese restaurants, across the San Gabriel Valley in the Los Angeles area are reporting significant declines in business as novel coronavirus concerns continue to keep diners away. Many popular restaurants in the area have closed temporarily or even permanently in Southern California’s most populated Asian-American community. The latest affected are Hong Kong-style restaurant Henry’s Cuisine and Cantonese restaurant Top Island Seafood in Alhambra. Both establishments are closed for the next two months due to coronavirus concerns.

Henry’s Cuisine, which has been open since 2015, is a casual cafe known for its affordable breakfast sets. Top Island, which has been open since 2007, was a popular dim sum spot in the morning and an affordable Cantonese seafood restaurant at night. Cantonese/Chaozhou restaurant Seafood Palace in Monterey Park, was a staple in the community, but was forced to close permanently last week.

Although all three restaurants may have been suffering less-than-expected sales prior to the novel coronavirus news hitting San Gabriel Valley, COVID-19 has exacerbated the situation and forced them to close right away, according to a neighboring restaurant owner familiar with the situation who chose not to give their name. The person added, “Owners don’t want to affect employees’ income so they try to stay open as long as they can, but the small mom-and-pops can’t hold on for too long.”

After speaking to dozens of Chinese restaurant owners in the SGV area, they estimate that their businesses are down anywhere between 30 to 75 percent amid the coronavirus outbreak, which originated in Wuhan, China, and has since spread across the globe.

”The business right now is so slow,” said one restaurateur. “Before [the outbreak] it was very busy”, echoed another.

The owners reiterated over and over they believe that concerns over the novel coronavirus spreading across the U.S. have turned people against Chinese restaurants and Chinese-owned businesses.

Arthur Tang, who owns two restaurants in the San Gabriel Valley, Malubianbian and Chengdu Impression, says his overall business has been down at least 70 percent. “Before, our wait time to get in was two plus hours, and now it’s basically all walk-in,” said Tang. In response to the panic, his restaurants are sterilized daily to ease concerns.

“We do body check temperature on every customer to make sure every store is healthy. We’ve also been giving discounts to encourage diners to come in,” says Tang.

Not only are diners are staying away, some restaurants are struggling to get certain ingredients and supplies in from China because many factories are still closed. China mandated factory shutdowns across the country last month extending the annual two week Lunar New Year holiday. Although many of those restrictions have now been removed, leading to a slow return to work for people, many major manufacturers remain closed.

A representative from Bistro Na’s, the only Michelin-star Chinese restaurant in Southern California, says business has been reduced by 30 to 40 percent. She says going forward, their focus will be on delivery. The representative also noted that they have had problems with importing tea leaves from China. Chef Tiantian Qiu, who owns Sichuan restaurants Hip Hop in Monterey Park and Mala Town in Sawtelle Japantown, has been having issues importing peppercorn and other unique spices in from China for her dishes.

Though restaurants seem to have seen a significant decline in sales, supermarkets like 99 Ranch and 168 Market are doing extremely well since more people are choosing to cook and stay in, according to some restaurant owners who did not wish to be named.

Popular SGV dessert chain Meet Fresh also commented that they have lost over 20 percent of revenue since the end of January when novel coronavirus concerns began. Meet Fresh’s representative noted that if the concerns continued, the dessert chain would focus more on delivery in coming months to combat further reductions in sales.

Jocelyn Wong, who manages popular food Instagram account @hangrydiary, noted that she continues to dine out in San Gabriel Valley despite being worried about the virus. “I still continue to dine at Chinese restaurants. I don’t want to see them close, so I dine out a lot as I normally would. Yes, I am concerned, but I pick earlier hours to dine out to avoid the crowds or order delivery if needed,” says Wong.

Uniboil, a hot pot restaurant in Monterey Park, has seen a 75 percent drop in business. When asked how long he would be able to keep his restaurant afloat, owner Alan Pun somberly responded, “Maybe not long.”

Even Din Tai Fung in the Westfield Santa Anita Mall isn’t busy at the moment, with ample room for walk-in diners. The popular soup dumpling restaurant, which used to command large crowds and long waits every day of the week, is only half-filled.

Not all Chinese restaurants are on the brink of closing, but there has been a trend of diners eating out earlier around 5 p.m. versus the typical 7 or 8 p.m. dinner rush. The manager at New Lucky, a Cantonese seafood restaurant in Monterey Park, said that the new trend is that diners start coming in very early and place a lot of take out orders. “Business is still way down, but we’re trying to take it one day at a time,” she said.

And although business has definitely declined across the board, it seems as though more affordable restaurants, with breakfast and lunch deals like Delicious Food Corner, Happy Harbor, and The Bay Cafe, have still been full during peak times. Restaurants that specialize in unique dishes like Ji Rong with their Peking duck also seem to be doing well.

https://cdn.vox-cdn.com/thumbor/HGYi...anbian_001.jpg
Malubianbian hot pot restaurant in Rowland Heights, which regularly fielded two-hour waits until the novel coronavirus news. The restaurant now accepts walk-ins without any wait time. Wonho Frank Lee

Source: https://la.eater.com/2020/3/11/21175...Z0BuWyz5DExlsY

sopas ej Mar 12, 2020 3:36 PM

Has anyone else noticed what seems to be a drop in heavy traffic? I have, at least in my area. Could it be the result of this coronavirus paranoia?

Pedestrian Mar 12, 2020 3:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JManc (Post 8859336)
Four of my father's friends were on that cruise ship off Japan. Of course most of us won't know anyone directly impacted; it's 1200-1300 people out of 320 million. In total, about 130,000 have been infected globally.

Just my point. In this country or China, we only really know what we are told because we have no way to have first hand knowledge. We may see secondary effects—empty TP shelves, less traffic, somebody taking temps as we go in to work—but those things also depend on what we are all told and if we are lied to everything can seem different.

homebucket Mar 12, 2020 3:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sopas ej (Post 8859345)
Has anyone else noticed what seems to be a drop in heavy traffic? I have, at least in my area. Could it be the result of this coronavirus paranoia?

Definitely. SF is a ghost town. All the techies are WFH, tourism is way down, people aren't eating out, sporting events suspended/canceled, public events like parades/marathons canceled, etc.

Side note: I wouldn't describe it as paranoia. Shutting down these large events is smart. Hoarding TP and hand sanitizer however would be paranoia. When you clear out the store of hand sanitizer, preventing everyone else from getting it, it just means other people will be more likely to get it, which means you'll be more likely to get it no matter how much hand sanitizer you bathe in.

JManc Mar 12, 2020 3:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pedestrian (Post 8859364)
Just my point. In this country or China, we only really know what we are told because we have no way to have first hand knowledge. We may see secondary effects—empty TP shelves, less traffic, somebody taking temps as we go in to work—but those things also depend on what we are all told and if we are lied to everything can seem diffetent.

It's the fear of not being in control and one thing we can control is running out and buying stuff for the apocalypse. In three months, these idiots who hoarded toilet paper by the bulk will be giving it away because it's taking up half a closet.

sopas ej Mar 12, 2020 4:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by homebucket (Post 8859371)
Definitely. SF is a ghost town. All the techies are WFH, tourism is way down, people aren't eating out, sporting events suspended/canceled, public events like parades/marathons canceled, etc.

Side note: I wouldn't describe it as paranoia. Shutting down these large events is smart. Hoarding TP and hand sanitizer however would be paranoia. When you clear out the store of hand sanitizer, preventing everyone else from getting it, it just means other people will be more likely to get it, which means you'll be more likely to get it no matter how much hand sanitizer you bathe in.

It's a respiratory illness, no? You can lube up with the hand sanitizer, but ultimately you're gonna breathe that virus in, right? That shit don't make no sense!

iheartthed Mar 12, 2020 4:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JManc (Post 8859268)
The 'social distancing' mode sounds like the only way to keep this thing at bay; look at China. Merely telling the 70's and above or those with illness to stay home while the rest of us goes on with life probably isn't going to cut it .

And it's too late, the world economy is already fucked.

Yeah, social distancing is about controlling the outbreak so it doesn't overwhelm the health care system. Breaking the system will be bad for everyone, whether you catch the virus or not.

hauntedheadnc Mar 12, 2020 4:13 PM

14 cases in North Carolina, mostly in the state's biggest cities. The two newest cases are in Charlotte.

Here, the closest case is about an hour away in Spartanburg, SC.

Pedestrian Mar 12, 2020 4:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sopas ej (Post 8859382)
It's a respiratory illness, no? You can lube up with the hand sanitizer, but ultimately you're gonna breathe that virus in, right? That shit don't make no sense!

Not exactly.

- It’s not entirely a respiratory illness although the deaths almost all seem to be from respiratory failure. But recently there’s some attention being paid to the gastrointestinal component (including diarrhea).

- The expelled droplets that people breathe or cough out are heavy enough that they only travel 3 - 6 ft and then settle on surfaces where you can pick them up on hands. But they are saying if you stay 6 feet from other people you aren’t going to breathe it in.

homebucket Mar 12, 2020 4:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sopas ej (Post 8859382)
It's a respiratory illness, no? You can lube up with the hand sanitizer, but ultimately you're gonna breathe that virus in, right? That shit don't make no sense!

I think it stays on surfaces for awhile, so if you touch something and then unknowingly touch your face out of habit as literally everyone does, then you can get it.

Handro Mar 12, 2020 4:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pedestrian (Post 8859405)
Not exactly.

- It’s not entirely a respiratory illness although the deaths almost all seem to be from respiratory failure. But recently there’s some attention being paid to the gastrointestinal component (including diarrhea).

- The expelled droplets that people breathe or cough out are heavy enough that they only travel 3 - 6 ft and then settle on surfaces where you can pick them up on hands. But they are saying if you stay 6 feet from other people you aren’t going to breathe it in.

So how long does the disease "live" in the droplets once it lands on a surface? Michael Osterholm (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Osterholm) said that the whole "wash your hands!" thing was basically to quell anxiety, and give people a sense of control.

Clearly, wash your hands, but does it really do anything to protect against corona specifically?

I'm debating going to the gym this evening. On the one hand, seems to be tempting fate. On the other, not that hard to stay 3-6 feet away from people at the gym and to wash my hands before I touch my face.

WonderlandPark3 Mar 12, 2020 4:51 PM

Rumor is we are shutting down production tomorrow. Will see. Def. getting real.

Steely Dan Mar 12, 2020 4:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WonderlandPark3 (Post 8859456)
Rumor is we are shutting down production tomorrow. Will see. Def. getting real.

production of what?

sopas ej Mar 12, 2020 5:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Handro (Post 8859438)
So how long does the disease "live" in the droplets once it lands on a surface? Michael Osterholm (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Osterholm) said that the whole "wash your hands!" thing was basically to quell anxiety, and give people a sense of control.

As if people never washed their hands regularly before? I'm sure some of you have seen this meme floating around?
https://scontent-fml1-1.xx.fbcdn.net...2c&oe=5EA65D80

I've already accepted the fact that I may eventually be exposed to COVID-19; if worse came to worse, I live in California, I could always apply for state disability insurance, if I had to miss work.

Pedestrian Mar 12, 2020 5:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JManc (Post 8859379)
It's the fear of not being in control and one thing we can control is running out and buying stuff for the apocalypse. In three months, these idiots who hoarded toilet paper by the bulk will be giving it away because it's taking up half a closet.

Toilet paper lasts until the cockroaches eat it. I've been a hoarder forever because I have an irrational fear of discovering I'm out in the middle of acute need. So I am currently using TP I bought 2 years ago (it's stacked in the garage, not a closet). I wouldn't worry about what's being hoarded eventually getting used.

I was thinking about buying Kimberly-Clark until I realized however great their sales may be now (TP, Kleenex), it's just pulling forward demand. When the crisis is over, demand will collapse because whatever the hoarders buy they can use the rest of their lives. It won't go bad.

WonderlandPark3 Mar 12, 2020 5:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steely Dan (Post 8859458)
production of what?

edit double post

WonderlandPark3 Mar 12, 2020 5:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steely Dan (Post 8859458)
production of what?

TV show. We would have shut down around April 1 otherwise. Rumors all over Hollywood of shows shutting down.

Looks like Broadway in NYC is shutting down imminently.

Pedestrian Mar 12, 2020 5:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sopas ej (Post 8859488)
I've already accepted the fact that I may eventually be exposed to COVID-19; if worse came to worse, I live in California, I could always apply for state disability insurance, if I had to miss work.

Your problem comes if you aren't exposed, just laid off because your employer shuts or has no business. Under current rules to get unemployment, which is hardly sufficient anyway, you have to be looking for work. Not only is nobody likely to be hiring but we don't want people out looking for work right now. That needs to be fixed.


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