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-   -   How Is Covid-19 Impacting Life in Your City? (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showthread.php?t=242036)

bilbao58 Mar 6, 2020 7:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jtown,man (Post 8852944)
I don't know about my city, but my life has changed zero. I. Don't. Care.

Maybe that means I am depressed? I don't know.

I hope you're mood lightens up enough so you can be terrified like the rest of us!

(I jest)

subterranean Mar 6, 2020 7:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Handro (Post 8853138)
I've been reading more and more that health leaders are reaching a consensus it was around long before initially realized.

This. Oregon is now saying there are likely several hundred people with the virus and it's been around for weeks without us knowing. Think about the exponential spread of hundreds of people not known to have the virus. The first three they caught 1) worked at an elementary school, 2) worked at a casino and 3) went to a high school basketball game, respectively.

bilbao58 Mar 6, 2020 7:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by austlar1 (Post 8851806)
hopefully others will jump in and post about what's going on in their neck of the woods as we head into uncharged territory with this scary bug. What are the medical, social, and economic implications in your home town?

Here in San Antonio the mayor is all pissed, and rightfully so, at the CDC for releasing a woman from quarantine before the results of her final test came in. The results were weakly positive. After being released, she went to a local mall and spent a couple of hours at the food court. I am sooooo glad I hate malls!

In Houston, my home town, a rumor was started WEEKS AGO that a restaurant worker in "Asiatown" tested positive and the businesses and restaurants have really suffered.

bilbao58 Mar 6, 2020 7:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by subterranean (Post 8853216)
Think about the exponential spread of hundreds of people not known to have the virus. The first three they caught 1) worked at an elementary school, 2) worked at a casino and 3) went to a high school basketball game, respectively.

I read the other day that at least one researcher believes Seattle is basically where Wuhan was in early January. My niece and her family live in Seattle. :(

bilbao58 Mar 6, 2020 8:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The North One (Post 8851975)
Seattle seems like it's being hit hard.

Speaking of Seattle: https://twitter.com/emeraldcitycon/s...093273602?s=20

https://pbs.twimg.com/media/ESckLsJU...pg&name=medium

chris08876 Mar 6, 2020 9:45 PM

Some NY Banks are increasing the ability to work from home. A friend of mine is a KYC compliance officer, and his company, Mizuho Bank, is encouraging folks to work at home. Likewise with ING.

The continued sanitation of trains and subway stops continues. Even some of my clients, which are 3PL and International Logistics are implementing policies that if your sick... like sick at all (even flu)... to stay home.

Its going to strain supply chains in some cases should this get out of hand.

austlar1 Mar 6, 2020 10:20 PM

SXSW just cancelled here in Austin. $350 million dollar hit to local economy. Many people are very upset about this. Downtown bar and restaurant scene will be hardest hit along with hotel operators. Overall, I think it was the right decision. Still........, SXSW played a huge role over the past two decades role in branding Austin as a happening city. Cancelling is going to take a toll on Austin's psyche.

homebucket Mar 6, 2020 10:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by austlar1 (Post 8853469)
SXSW just cancelled here in Austin. $350 million dollar hit to local economy. Many people are very upset about this. Downtown bar and restaurant scene will be hardest hit along with hotel operators. Overall, I think it was the right decision. Still........, SXSW played a huge over the past two decades role in branding Austin as a happening city. Cancelling is going to take a toll on Austin's psyche.

It's the right (and smart) move.

austlar1 Mar 6, 2020 10:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by homebucket (Post 8853489)
It's the right (and smart) move.

I agree. It will almost certainly prevent some spread of the virus. It is definitely a wake up call for locals who are still very complacent or disbelieving.

The North One Mar 6, 2020 10:35 PM

Wow, guess I was wrong. I'm glad people will get their money back.

The North One Mar 6, 2020 10:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bilbao58 (Post 8853349)

Seattle is the epicenter for this virus in North America right now. It's kinda scary. They must have been the first in the country to come in contact with it going undetected for months. Why else is it so bad there?

austlar1 Mar 6, 2020 11:32 PM

Epicenter probably just moved south. Cruise ship holding off San Francisco has now confirmed 21 covid-19 cases. Ship will dock at an undisclosed location (presumably in Bay Area) where patients will be removed and other passengers screened and then probably some kind of quarantine. I think there are over 3500 passengers and crew on board. What a nightmare!

ATXboom Mar 6, 2020 11:47 PM

SXSW has been cancelled which is crazy. Likely due to international nature of event and liability issues.

RedCorsair87 Mar 7, 2020 4:22 AM

So far at least two conventions have been cancelled in Chicago.

A CPS Special Needs Assistant was just diagnosed in Chicago. She went to work sick.

https://www.chicagotribune.com/coron...ihm-story.html

Pedestrian Mar 7, 2020 5:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by austlar1 (Post 8853561)
Epicenter probably just moved south. Cruise ship holding off San Francisco has now confirmed 21 covid-19 cases. Ship will dock at an undisclosed location (presumably in Bay Area) where patients will be removed and other passengers screened and then probably some kind of quarantine. I think there are over 3500 passengers and crew on board. What a nightmare!

The ship is sailing south “along the California coast” to a non-commercial port. I know of only two possible non-commercial ports capable of docking a large cruise ship. The most likely is Naval Base San Diego. Long Beach Naval Shipyard could have before its closure in 1997 but I’m not sure of its condition now.

San Diego makes a lot of sense: It’s the home of one of the largest Naval Hospitals as well as other military bases including Camp Pendleton where infected but not too sick people could be quarantined.

austlar1 Mar 7, 2020 5:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RedCorsair87 (Post 8853774)
So far at least two conventions have been cancelled in Chicago.

A CPS Special Needs Assistant was just diagnosed in Chicago. She went to work sick.

https://www.chicagotribune.com/coron...ihm-story.html

This is terrible. Besides going to work sick, she was a passenger on the Grand Princess over two weeks ago. That's the same ship currently sitting with 3500 passengers and crew off the coast of California that has 21 confirmed new cases on board. It probably means a similar boatload of infected passengers disembarked 11 days ago and scattered all over the country.

Pedestrian Mar 7, 2020 5:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ATXboom (Post 8853579)
SXSW has been cancelled which is crazy. Likely due to international nature of event and liability issues.

Not crazy at all and entirely predictable. Just about all upcoming conventions and trade shows in San Francisco have been cancelled and I expect that to happen everywhere. Next will be pro sports games played without fans in empty stadia.

AviationGuy Mar 7, 2020 5:19 AM

A server at my favorite Tex Mex restaurant was noticeably sick yesterday. As he waited on me, he kept touching his mouth and nose, and as he worked, he coughed a lot. I asked him why he didn't stay home, and he said he had to make a living. There are likely millions in this country in the same position. But I believe it will soon be the case where customers won't patronize any such businesses. The manager/owner wasn't present but I left a message. Haven't heard back.

As someone else said here, at my age I can't afford to be around people who have respiratory illnesses.

Pedestrian Mar 7, 2020 5:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by austlar1 (Post 8853790)
This is terrible. Besides going to work sick, she was a passenger on the Grand Princess over two weeks ago. That's the same ship currently sitting with 3500 passengers and crew off the coast of California that has 21 confirmed new cases on board. It probably means a similar boatload of infected passengers disembarked 11 days ago and scattered all over the country.

Most likely the infections on the ship occurred on the last voyage to Mazatlan, Manzanilla and Puerto Vallarta. Of the 21 positives aboard so far (testing isn’t complete), I believe 19 were crew members which makes sense since the crew but not most of the passengers were the same on the last trip as on the current one which was to have been to Hawaii.

This not only means what you said—that a bunch of infected passengers got off and spread around the country, but it means there’s a source of infection in Mexico that no one’s talking about.

I posted earlier about the fact that as of Monday Mexico had done less than 100 tests countrywide. It is known to have 6 infected people. But likely there are foci of infection all over that country nobody knows about.

Pedestrian Mar 7, 2020 5:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AviationGuy (Post 8853796)
A server at my favorite Tex Mex restaurant was noticeably sick yesterday. As he waited on me, he kept touching his mouth and nose, and as he worked, he coughed a lot. I asked him why he didn't stay home, and he said he had to make a living. There are likely millions in this country in the same position. But I believe it will soon be the case where customers won't patronize any such businesses. The manager/owner wasn't present but I left a message. Haven't heard back.

As someone else said here, at my age I can't afford to be around people who have respiratory illnesses.

Mexican? See above.

Pedestrian Mar 7, 2020 5:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pedestrian (Post 8853794)
Next will be pro sports games played without fans in empty stadia.

Well, just found out my alma mater Johns Hopkins played today’s intercollegiate basketball game in an empty arena. The pros are definitely next.

austlar1 Mar 7, 2020 5:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pedestrian (Post 8853802)
Most likely the infections on the ship occurred on the last voyage to Cabo San Lucas I believe. Of the 21 positives aboard so far (testing isn’t complete), I believe 19 were crew members which makes sense since the crew but not most of the passengers were the same on the last trip as on the current one which was to have been to Hawaii.

This not only means what you said—that a bunch of infected passengers got off and spread around the country, but it means there’s a source of infection in Mexico that no one’s talking about.

I posted earlier about the fact that as of Monday Mexico had done less than 100 tests countrywide. It is known to have 6 infected people, none in Baja. But likely there are foci of infection all over that country nobody knows about.

This from the linked Wapo article below: "The situation with the Grand Princess is particularly fraught because authorities are also racing to track down passengers who took an earlier voyage on the ship last month to Mexico. A 71-year-old man from that trip later died in California from covid-19."

The Chicago woman is now the second known patient from that earlier Grand Princess voyage.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/healt...b81_story.html

chris08876 Mar 7, 2020 6:06 AM

So far the NY Auto Show is still on, but I fear they will cancel it. The Javits Center has taken measures to sanitize or improve the general hygiene of the facility, but we shall see.

Possible exposure over in Brooklyn at the Brooklyn AG office. In the days coming, we'll probally see more cases.

Deblasio ordered mandatory testing for public workers. So teachers for example.

The tourism industry is huge in this city, and with the warmer weather on its way, its really going to curtail this years tourism numbers and economic output.

Pedestrian Mar 7, 2020 8:24 AM

THANK GOD!

Quote:

The Museum of Ice Cream in San Francisco does not plan to close, a spokesman told the San Francisco Chronicle.
https://www.bizjournals.com/sanfranc...JhMVpqa0U2WCJ9

hauntedheadnc Mar 7, 2020 6:31 PM

Saw my first sold-out displays of hand sanitizer today when I went to the grocery store. As for me, I'm trying to buy a little extra this and that here and there, in addition to whatever I need for what I'm making for dinner tonight. Today, for instance, I picked up two packs of chicken breasts when I only needed one, plus a couple of pounds of ground beef that I didn't need immediately. Stocking up slowly and calmly...

Meanwhile, at the hospital where my husband is doing my clinicals, they took the batteries out of half of the hand sanitizer dispensers because they can't find refills.

MonkeyRonin Mar 7, 2020 6:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AviationGuy (Post 8853796)
A server at my favorite Tex Mex restaurant was noticeably sick yesterday. As he waited on me, he kept touching his mouth and nose, and as he worked, he coughed a lot. I asked him why he didn't stay home, and he said he had to make a living. There are likely millions in this country in the same position. But I believe it will soon be the case where customers won't patronize any such businesses. The manager/owner wasn't present but I left a message. Haven't heard back.


Read a good article the other day about why the US may be hit particularly hard due to the lack of paid sick leave and preponderance of gig workers (Canada isn't much better in this regard either). Between the choices of losing their jobs or potentially risk transmitting the virus to others, most people will probably choose the latter.


Quote:

The Problem With Telling Sick Workers to Stay Home

Even with the coronavirus spreading, lax labor laws and little sick leave mean that many people can’t afford to skip work.

Amanda Mull
February 28, 2020


As the coronavirus that has sickened tens of thousands in China spreads worldwide, it now seems like a virtual inevitability that millions of Americans are going to be infected with the flu-like illness known as COVID-19. Public-health officials in the United States have started preparing for what the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is calling a “significant disruption” to daily life. Because more than 80 percent of cases are mild and many will show no symptoms at all, limiting the disease’s spread rests on the basics of prevention: Wash your hands well and frequently, cover your mouth when you cough, and stay home if you feel ill. But that last thing might prove to be among the biggest Achilles’ heels in efforts to stymie the spread of COVID-19. The culture of the American workplace puts everyone’s health at unnecessary risk.

For all but the independently wealthy in America, the best-case scenario for getting sick is being a person with good health insurance, paid time off, and a reasonable boss who won’t penalize you for taking a few sick days or working from home. For millions of the country’s workers, such a scenario is a nearly inconceivable luxury. “With more than a third of Americans in jobs that offer no sick leave at all, many unfortunately cannot afford to take any days off when they are feeling sick,” Robyn Gershon, an epidemiology professor at the NYU School of Global Public Health, wrote in an email. “People who do not (or cannot) stay home when ill do present a risk to others.” On this count, the United States is a global anomaly, one of only a handful of countries that doesn’t guarantee its workers paid leave of any kind. These jobs are also the kind least likely to supply workers with health insurance, making it difficult for millions of people to get medical proof that they can’t go to work.

They’re also concentrated in the service industry or gig economy, in which workers have contact, directly or indirectly, with large numbers of people. These are the workers who are stocking the shelves of America’s stores, preparing and serving food in its restaurants, driving its Ubers, and manning its checkout counters. Their jobs tend to fall outside the bounds of paid-leave laws, even in states or cities that have them. Gershon emphasizes that having what feels like a head cold or mild flu—which COVID-19 will feel like to most healthy people—often isn’t considered a good reason to miss a shift by those who hold these workers’ livelihood in their hands.

Read more: https://www.theatlantic.com/health/a...=pocket-newtab

montréaliste Mar 7, 2020 7:33 PM

Just heard an interesting program on a French radio about "Typhoid Mary", a cook that used to work for wealthy families in NYC in the early 1900s.

She carried the typhus virus but was unaffected by the disease. Whenever she prepared food that was uncooked, she would pass on the disease and 3 people died and 50 plus were ill from it. She was quarantined and ordered by court to find other employment but continued her "vocation". A judge finally ruled on forcible confinement for the rest of her life, 26 years. Ouch.

austlar1 Mar 7, 2020 8:13 PM

A local hotel industry exec who posts on the Austin forum reports that his hotel and most other local hotels are contemplating layoffs and severe cost cutting measures. The SXSW cancellation left a huge hole that pretty much wipes March off the books for local hotels and downtown entertainment and food establishments. Supposedly there have been multiple convention and business meeting cancellations scheduled for later in the spring and summer. Austin built several thousand additional hotel rooms downtown (with more in the pipeline) over the past three or four years. Convention and tourism is probably now our second largest employment sector. I guess the same story will play out in place after place over the next several months.

SATURDAY AFTERNOON UPDATE- Took a drive down South Congress and through downtown this afternoon. I was surprised and pleased to see the sidewalks filled with pedestrians and the local businesses doing brisk business. It is a slightly chilly but sunny afternoon here in Austin. The bars and restaurants with sidewalk service were all looking busy. Obviously there are still a lot of visitors in town for the weekend. It would be nice to see activity of this sort remain somewhat normal in the days and weeks ahead.

rsbear Mar 7, 2020 10:01 PM

I don't have quantifiable data, but I've gone to my local grocery store (Studio City area of Los Angeles) every morning for the past three days and it seems quieter than normal. Especially this morning, being that it's Saturday. Inventory of everything but hand sanitizer has been great, until this morning when the Clorox wipes-types of products was low. Tons of toilet paper, even some on sale. Whereas my local Costco has been out of TP and sterilizing wipes for a week. Oh, gas has dropped about $.20 per gallon in the past three weeks.

SIGSEGV Mar 8, 2020 1:02 AM

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/Vf...=w1283-h962-no

Only saw two people wearing masks... fortunately there weren't very many old people there (with one notable exception...)

AviationGuy Mar 8, 2020 4:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pedestrian (Post 8853803)
Mexican? See above.

Not sure what you're saying. I'm there about 3 times per week and I haven't noticed any of the employees being away in quite some time. But I do have concerns about anyone working who has a respiratory illness, whether Hispanic, Anglo, or whatever.

AviationGuy Mar 8, 2020 5:01 AM

My gym has been quiet this week. Maybe half the normal crowd. I guess people are concerned about touching workout equipment that others have used. Seems like if someone is concerned, they should wipe down the equipment before using it. Many people do that anyway.

The strange thing is that two Chinese restaurants I frequent have been nearly empty during the lunch "rush". My favorite one isn't even run by people from China. They're as American as I am. Their heritage is Cambodian and they've never been to China. I guess there are people who are afraid of Chinese food just like those won't drink a Corona.

Pedestrian Mar 8, 2020 7:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AviationGuy (Post 8854497)
Not sure what you're saying. I'm there about 3 times per week and I haven't noticed any of the employees being away in quite some time. But I do have concerns about anyone working who has a respiratory illness, whether Hispanic, Anglo, or whatever.

I'm saying I think Mexico has a bigger problem than anyone has noticed right now and in future will have a very major one because there is very little governmental capability there to oppose spread of the virus. That being the case, where I live right up against the border, where Walmart and the local fast food joints are well partonized by Mexicans and a signficant number of local residents including restaurant staff cross the border regularly, if there's unobserved spread in Mexico it's going to cross the border.

To be fair, though, it's a question in which direction the virus crosses first. An American tourist apparently brought it to Costa Rica and may be doing the same to Mexico.

Pedestrian Mar 8, 2020 5:46 PM

Quote:

Oakland council member says top officials learned of plans to dock in city on Saturday night

SAN FRANCISCO — Oakland council member Larry Reid, of the city’s Seventh District, said he was informed Saturday night that the cruise ship would dock in the city at a site known as Ports America in West Oakland.

The news surprised city officials — particularly for the council, which Reid said did not have a hand in the decision. Reid said the Oakland Fire Department was expected to play a role in taking passengers off the ship.
Reid was puzzled, however, at the decision to dock the ship in Oakland instead of its original site in San Francisco.

“I just don’t understand why if it’s safe enough for them to offload the passengers into Oakland, why isn’t it safe enough for them to offload the passengers in San Francisco, where they have the facilities for the cruise line that’s docked in San Francisco on a daily basis?” he asked.

Asked whether it seemed the move was a signal of Oakland’s seeming second-fiddle status in political power, Reid said: “That’s something they would say, and a lot of Oakland residents would say” . . . .
https://www.washingtonpost.com/world...3LNEQP3F7NIHMA
:rolleyes:

tdawg Mar 8, 2020 6:02 PM

In NYC we've gone from just a few cases to over 100 in a few days. I work for the City University of New York and there are rumblings that the whole CUNY system may shut down for a week before April but I have not yet heard of any cases at a CUNY school. They're mostly confined to Westchester County at this point.

KevinFromTexas Mar 8, 2020 7:49 PM

Well, we just got back from the grocery store 30 minutes ago, and besides not having any hand sanitizer, which was expected, they're also without toilet paper. We only wanted some hand sanitizer for a road trip this weekend, but I had been to three different stores this week and didn't see any.

Pedestrian Mar 8, 2020 7:56 PM

^^

Quote:

How to make hand sanitizer: Ingredients you’ll need

- 2/3 cup 99% rubbing (isopropyl) alcohol (buy rubbing alcohol on Amazon)
- 1/3 cup 100% pure aloe vera gel (buy aloe vera gel on Amazon)
- Optional: 8-10 drops essential oil for smell (buy essential oils on Amazon)

- Bowl and spoon
- Funnel
- Empty liquid soap or hand sanitizer bottle (or buy plastic bottles on Amazon)
- Optional: Gloves

How to make hand sanitizer in two steps

Step 1: Mix the rubbing alcohol, aloe vera and optional essential oil in a bowl with a spoon. Be careful to keep pure alcohol away from your skin.

Step 2: Funnel the mixture into the empty bottle. Screw the pump cap back on and voila, you have hand sanitizer.

Making hand sanitizer at home: Warnings

As easy as it is to make your own hand sanitizer, you should be aware that rubbing alcohol in high quantities can damage your skin. Make sure you stick to the 2:1 proportion to keep the alcohol content around 60%. You can also use gloves while mixing and follow up sanitization with hand moisturizer.
https://www.tomsguide.com/news/how-t...ing-it-at-home

I have one quibble about this. Commercial rubbing alcohol is not 99%--it's usually no more than 70%. What I bought at CVS is only 50%. This is because alcohol is hydrophilic--even if it's pure (99%) when you buy it, as soon as you open it it begins to absorb water vapor from the air and generally reaches a concentration around 70% where it stays (this is why, for example, about the strongest alcoholic beverages you can buy are around 150 "proof" or 75% alcohol). I still think it will work though.

rsbear Mar 8, 2020 8:28 PM

Went to the barbershop on Friday - busy. Walked past a nail salon a few minutes ago - every chair was occupied. I've read that those types of services are the first to see business decline/stop in an epidemic. Seems like life is pretty normal here in Los Angeles.

Pedestrian Mar 8, 2020 8:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rsbear (Post 8854841)
Went to the barbershop on Friday - busy. Walked past a nail salon a few minutes ago - every chair was occupied. I've read that those types of services are the first to see business decline/stop in an epidemic. Seems like life is pretty normal here in Los Angeles.

Check the hotels. It's the tourist industry that's feeling things the worst right now. SF hotels are emptying out and laying off staff due to convention/trade show cancellations.

Next may be people who work at sporting venues if they start playing games without fans.

Video Link

park123 Mar 8, 2020 9:01 PM

This Saturday was really busy in Manhattan. I mean yesterday. Like busier than any other Saturday this year even. Today Sunday seems a bit slow, but not especially so. It was the weekdays last week that seemed kind of slow. I wonder if that's because people are starting to work from home.

Conventions are not a big part of NYC's tourist base. And travelers usually buy tickets months before their trips? So I think most people who already paid for their airline tickets are still coming. And maybe all the NYC residents who hang out in Manhattan on weekends are still doing so.

I guess it will feel slow again starting tomorrow, especially since more and more people are going to be working from home. I have friends in finance who are working from home as company policy starting tomorrow.

park123 Mar 8, 2020 9:04 PM

This seems more and more like a threat primarily (or almost entirely) to the very old. It's easy for me to say because I'm not in that group, but. The PM of Italy said something to the effect of "we have to do this [huge quarantined areas] to protect our grandparents"

chris08876 Mar 9, 2020 2:54 AM

Businesses are going to be impacted in the NYC area if they are hiking prices aka price gouging as a result of this situation; in the form of fines. Amazon recently started cracking down on this. I remember seeing hand sanitizer going for $40+.

Some of the local places in NJ around my area are restricting or capping the number of items some folks can buy.

Pedestrian Mar 9, 2020 3:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by park123 (Post 8854871)
This seems more and more like a threat primarily (or almost entirely) to the very old. It's easy for me to say because I'm not in that group, but. The PM of Italy said something to the effect of "we have to do this [huge quarantined areas] to protect our grandparents"

A little wishful thinking there? The main opposition party leader in Italy has it. The PM could be thinking he's next.

park123 Mar 9, 2020 3:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pedestrian (Post 8855091)
A little wishful thinking there? The main opposition party leader in Italy has it. The PM could be thinking he's next.

Sure anyone can catch it. But it seems mild (like a regular flu or maybe a bad case of the flu) for most people. I read a day ago (maybe this has been superseded now I don’t know) that just about all of the people who died from corona in Italy were over 80 years old.

bilbao58 Mar 9, 2020 6:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by park123 (Post 8855106)
Sure anyone can catch it. But it seems mild (like a regular flu or maybe a bad case of the flu) for most people.

It still has a death rate 10 times that of the flu for people under 50. And it might not kill you, or even make you ill, but it could very well kill Granny after you go visit her.


From a piece in the New Yorker:

“... people will continue going to big events and say to themselves that this virus might only hurt people over the age of eighty,
not me and my family,” Mina said. They won’t change their behavior in a way to help slow down this virus.”

https://www.newyorker.com/news/daily...he-coronavirus


If you want to help slow down the virus and prevent it from killing more people, you have to act as if it will kill you. Even if it most likely won't.
It's not just about protecting yourself, or whether you really even need to protect yourself. It's about doing what's needed to slow down the spread of this virus. It's Public Health 101.

dimondpark Mar 9, 2020 7:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KevinFromTexas (Post 8854819)
Well, we just got back from the grocery store 30 minutes ago, and besides not having any hand sanitizer, which was expected, they're also without toilet paper. We only wanted some hand sanitizer for a road trip this weekend, but I had been to three different stores this week and didn't see any.

There are easy recipes for homemade hand sanitizer.

Here's one...
Video Link

Steely Dan Mar 9, 2020 3:15 PM

the 4th big upcoming conference at chicago's convention center just cancelled due to coronavirus.

so far that's 100,000 attendees that won't be coming to chicago in the next couple of months. 100,000 hotel rooms unfilled. 100,000 expense account restaurant meals that won't be eaten, 100,000 uber rides not taken, and the ripples keep on rippling.

and perhaps just the tip of the iceberg. :(

Handro Mar 9, 2020 3:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AviationGuy (Post 8854501)
My gym has been quiet this week. Maybe half the normal crowd. I guess people are concerned about touching workout equipment that others have used. Seems like if someone is concerned, they should wipe down the equipment before using it. Many people do that anyway.

The strange thing is that two Chinese restaurants I frequent have been nearly empty during the lunch "rush". My favorite one isn't even run by people from China. They're as American as I am. Their heritage is Cambodian and they've never been to China. I guess there are people who are afraid of Chinese food just like those won't drink a Corona.

I've noticed that at my gym too. I just wash my hands immediately after I workout, can't do much more than keep your hands clean and don't touch your face... at a certain point, if you get it you get it. It seems like the vast majority of people recover, so I'm still not too concerned for myself. I do worry about being a carrier and spreading it to older/compromised people, though.

emathias Mar 9, 2020 4:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pedestrian (Post 8854823)
^^


https://www.tomsguide.com/news/how-t...ing-it-at-home

I have one quibble about this. Commercial rubbing alcohol is not 99%--it's usually no more than 70%. What I bought at CVS is only 50%. This is because alcohol is hydrophilic--even if it's pure (99%) when you buy it, as soon as you open it it begins to absorb water vapor from the air and generally reaches a concentration around 70% where it stays (this is why, for example, about the strongest alcoholic beverages you can buy are around 150 "proof" or 75% alcohol). I still think it will work though.

I noticed yesterday on a trip to Target that they were completely sold out of chlorine bleach. They still had non-chlorine bleach, but the chlorine ones (which is what you need for disinfectant purposes - the other is only good for whitening).

I've never seen 50% alcohol in a CVS, and I would be very surprised if any health-related alcohol-only (or, rather, alcohol and water-only) sold for disinfectant purposes was lower than 60%, since 60-90% is considered the most effective concentration range for disinfectant purposes. Exceptions would usually have other disinfecting agents in the ingredients.

Also, at least in the U.S., the rubbing alcohol (ethyl or isopropyl alcohol) in any national chain will be a minimum of 70% because in the U.S., to be called "rubbing alcohol," the concentration *must* be 70% or greater. Usually you can also find 91% at larger stores.

As an FYI, while isopropyl, other propanols, ethyl, or methyl alcohol will kill coronaviruses, ethyl alcohol is somewhat better for a wider range of viruses.

Finally, if using alcohol to disinfect skin or organics with any oil on the surface, the surface should either be cleaned with a detergent first, or cleaned with a mix of a detergent and alcohol, as alcohol has little to no detergent action and therefore won't properly disinfect anything with oil on it. That's why most recipes for homemade hand sanitizer includes at least a little dishwashing detergent. And why I personally dislike using hand sanitizer - because the detergents leave a residue I dislike.

(four 0 four) Mar 9, 2020 4:59 PM

At Saturday's MLS match between Atlanta United and FC Cincinnati, the announced attendance was just over 69,000 although judging from the number of empty seats, that doesn't seem accurate. There were quite a few more empty seats than I typically see in estimating the difference between 'tickets sold' and 'reported attendance' info. The fan pages show no interest in not attending future matches.
The only person I saw with a mask was on the train to the stadium.

There was an article in today's Atlanta Business Chronicle about the NCAA Final Four, scheduled for the first weekend in April at Mercedes-Benz Stadium. In part, it said:

Quote:

The Final Four is less than four weeks away and organizers say plans remain on track to execute the NCAA’s crown jewel event despite a growing number of coronavirus cases nationwide.
“It’ll ultimately be the [NCAA’s] decision as to any type of modifications or changes, if any, to the tournament,” Carl Adkins, executive director of the Atlanta Basketball Host Committee said. “We’re planning as if nothing has changed — and quite frankly nothing has changed at this point. We’re still planning for 80,000 people to be in the stadium on that final Saturday.”
The National College Players Association, a nonprofit advocacy group, recently said that it wants the NCAA to consider hosting games at its tournament sites without fans for public safety reasons. The NCAA COVID-19 advisory panel said last Friday though that it plans to move forward as scheduled and that it did not recommend cancelling athletic events across the country, including its own lucrative tournament. Dan Gavitt, the NCAA’s senior vice president of men’s basketball, echoed this sentiment when speaking on a CBS Sports telecast Sunday.
“At this time, we are definitively planning on running the tournament at all 14 sites with fans, from the First Four in Daytona through the Final Four in Atlanta,” he said.


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