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-   -   How Is Covid-19 Impacting Life in Your City? (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showthread.php?t=242036)

The North One Mar 6, 2020 10:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bilbao58 (Post 8853349)

Seattle is the epicenter for this virus in North America right now. It's kinda scary. They must have been the first in the country to come in contact with it going undetected for months. Why else is it so bad there?

austlar1 Mar 6, 2020 11:32 PM

Epicenter probably just moved south. Cruise ship holding off San Francisco has now confirmed 21 covid-19 cases. Ship will dock at an undisclosed location (presumably in Bay Area) where patients will be removed and other passengers screened and then probably some kind of quarantine. I think there are over 3500 passengers and crew on board. What a nightmare!

ATXboom Mar 6, 2020 11:47 PM

SXSW has been cancelled which is crazy. Likely due to international nature of event and liability issues.

RedCorsair87 Mar 7, 2020 4:22 AM

So far at least two conventions have been cancelled in Chicago.

A CPS Special Needs Assistant was just diagnosed in Chicago. She went to work sick.

https://www.chicagotribune.com/coron...ihm-story.html

Pedestrian Mar 7, 2020 5:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by austlar1 (Post 8853561)
Epicenter probably just moved south. Cruise ship holding off San Francisco has now confirmed 21 covid-19 cases. Ship will dock at an undisclosed location (presumably in Bay Area) where patients will be removed and other passengers screened and then probably some kind of quarantine. I think there are over 3500 passengers and crew on board. What a nightmare!

The ship is sailing south “along the California coast” to a non-commercial port. I know of only two possible non-commercial ports capable of docking a large cruise ship. The most likely is Naval Base San Diego. Long Beach Naval Shipyard could have before its closure in 1997 but I’m not sure of its condition now.

San Diego makes a lot of sense: It’s the home of one of the largest Naval Hospitals as well as other military bases including Camp Pendleton where infected but not too sick people could be quarantined.

austlar1 Mar 7, 2020 5:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RedCorsair87 (Post 8853774)
So far at least two conventions have been cancelled in Chicago.

A CPS Special Needs Assistant was just diagnosed in Chicago. She went to work sick.

https://www.chicagotribune.com/coron...ihm-story.html

This is terrible. Besides going to work sick, she was a passenger on the Grand Princess over two weeks ago. That's the same ship currently sitting with 3500 passengers and crew off the coast of California that has 21 confirmed new cases on board. It probably means a similar boatload of infected passengers disembarked 11 days ago and scattered all over the country.

Pedestrian Mar 7, 2020 5:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ATXboom (Post 8853579)
SXSW has been cancelled which is crazy. Likely due to international nature of event and liability issues.

Not crazy at all and entirely predictable. Just about all upcoming conventions and trade shows in San Francisco have been cancelled and I expect that to happen everywhere. Next will be pro sports games played without fans in empty stadia.

AviationGuy Mar 7, 2020 5:19 AM

A server at my favorite Tex Mex restaurant was noticeably sick yesterday. As he waited on me, he kept touching his mouth and nose, and as he worked, he coughed a lot. I asked him why he didn't stay home, and he said he had to make a living. There are likely millions in this country in the same position. But I believe it will soon be the case where customers won't patronize any such businesses. The manager/owner wasn't present but I left a message. Haven't heard back.

As someone else said here, at my age I can't afford to be around people who have respiratory illnesses.

Pedestrian Mar 7, 2020 5:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by austlar1 (Post 8853790)
This is terrible. Besides going to work sick, she was a passenger on the Grand Princess over two weeks ago. That's the same ship currently sitting with 3500 passengers and crew off the coast of California that has 21 confirmed new cases on board. It probably means a similar boatload of infected passengers disembarked 11 days ago and scattered all over the country.

Most likely the infections on the ship occurred on the last voyage to Mazatlan, Manzanilla and Puerto Vallarta. Of the 21 positives aboard so far (testing isn’t complete), I believe 19 were crew members which makes sense since the crew but not most of the passengers were the same on the last trip as on the current one which was to have been to Hawaii.

This not only means what you said—that a bunch of infected passengers got off and spread around the country, but it means there’s a source of infection in Mexico that no one’s talking about.

I posted earlier about the fact that as of Monday Mexico had done less than 100 tests countrywide. It is known to have 6 infected people. But likely there are foci of infection all over that country nobody knows about.

Pedestrian Mar 7, 2020 5:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AviationGuy (Post 8853796)
A server at my favorite Tex Mex restaurant was noticeably sick yesterday. As he waited on me, he kept touching his mouth and nose, and as he worked, he coughed a lot. I asked him why he didn't stay home, and he said he had to make a living. There are likely millions in this country in the same position. But I believe it will soon be the case where customers won't patronize any such businesses. The manager/owner wasn't present but I left a message. Haven't heard back.

As someone else said here, at my age I can't afford to be around people who have respiratory illnesses.

Mexican? See above.

Pedestrian Mar 7, 2020 5:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pedestrian (Post 8853794)
Next will be pro sports games played without fans in empty stadia.

Well, just found out my alma mater Johns Hopkins played today’s intercollegiate basketball game in an empty arena. The pros are definitely next.

austlar1 Mar 7, 2020 5:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pedestrian (Post 8853802)
Most likely the infections on the ship occurred on the last voyage to Cabo San Lucas I believe. Of the 21 positives aboard so far (testing isn’t complete), I believe 19 were crew members which makes sense since the crew but not most of the passengers were the same on the last trip as on the current one which was to have been to Hawaii.

This not only means what you said—that a bunch of infected passengers got off and spread around the country, but it means there’s a source of infection in Mexico that no one’s talking about.

I posted earlier about the fact that as of Monday Mexico had done less than 100 tests countrywide. It is known to have 6 infected people, none in Baja. But likely there are foci of infection all over that country nobody knows about.

This from the linked Wapo article below: "The situation with the Grand Princess is particularly fraught because authorities are also racing to track down passengers who took an earlier voyage on the ship last month to Mexico. A 71-year-old man from that trip later died in California from covid-19."

The Chicago woman is now the second known patient from that earlier Grand Princess voyage.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/healt...b81_story.html

chris08876 Mar 7, 2020 6:06 AM

So far the NY Auto Show is still on, but I fear they will cancel it. The Javits Center has taken measures to sanitize or improve the general hygiene of the facility, but we shall see.

Possible exposure over in Brooklyn at the Brooklyn AG office. In the days coming, we'll probally see more cases.

Deblasio ordered mandatory testing for public workers. So teachers for example.

The tourism industry is huge in this city, and with the warmer weather on its way, its really going to curtail this years tourism numbers and economic output.

Pedestrian Mar 7, 2020 8:24 AM

THANK GOD!

Quote:

The Museum of Ice Cream in San Francisco does not plan to close, a spokesman told the San Francisco Chronicle.
https://www.bizjournals.com/sanfranc...JhMVpqa0U2WCJ9

hauntedheadnc Mar 7, 2020 6:31 PM

Saw my first sold-out displays of hand sanitizer today when I went to the grocery store. As for me, I'm trying to buy a little extra this and that here and there, in addition to whatever I need for what I'm making for dinner tonight. Today, for instance, I picked up two packs of chicken breasts when I only needed one, plus a couple of pounds of ground beef that I didn't need immediately. Stocking up slowly and calmly...

Meanwhile, at the hospital where my husband is doing my clinicals, they took the batteries out of half of the hand sanitizer dispensers because they can't find refills.

MonkeyRonin Mar 7, 2020 6:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AviationGuy (Post 8853796)
A server at my favorite Tex Mex restaurant was noticeably sick yesterday. As he waited on me, he kept touching his mouth and nose, and as he worked, he coughed a lot. I asked him why he didn't stay home, and he said he had to make a living. There are likely millions in this country in the same position. But I believe it will soon be the case where customers won't patronize any such businesses. The manager/owner wasn't present but I left a message. Haven't heard back.


Read a good article the other day about why the US may be hit particularly hard due to the lack of paid sick leave and preponderance of gig workers (Canada isn't much better in this regard either). Between the choices of losing their jobs or potentially risk transmitting the virus to others, most people will probably choose the latter.


Quote:

The Problem With Telling Sick Workers to Stay Home

Even with the coronavirus spreading, lax labor laws and little sick leave mean that many people can’t afford to skip work.

Amanda Mull
February 28, 2020


As the coronavirus that has sickened tens of thousands in China spreads worldwide, it now seems like a virtual inevitability that millions of Americans are going to be infected with the flu-like illness known as COVID-19. Public-health officials in the United States have started preparing for what the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is calling a “significant disruption” to daily life. Because more than 80 percent of cases are mild and many will show no symptoms at all, limiting the disease’s spread rests on the basics of prevention: Wash your hands well and frequently, cover your mouth when you cough, and stay home if you feel ill. But that last thing might prove to be among the biggest Achilles’ heels in efforts to stymie the spread of COVID-19. The culture of the American workplace puts everyone’s health at unnecessary risk.

For all but the independently wealthy in America, the best-case scenario for getting sick is being a person with good health insurance, paid time off, and a reasonable boss who won’t penalize you for taking a few sick days or working from home. For millions of the country’s workers, such a scenario is a nearly inconceivable luxury. “With more than a third of Americans in jobs that offer no sick leave at all, many unfortunately cannot afford to take any days off when they are feeling sick,” Robyn Gershon, an epidemiology professor at the NYU School of Global Public Health, wrote in an email. “People who do not (or cannot) stay home when ill do present a risk to others.” On this count, the United States is a global anomaly, one of only a handful of countries that doesn’t guarantee its workers paid leave of any kind. These jobs are also the kind least likely to supply workers with health insurance, making it difficult for millions of people to get medical proof that they can’t go to work.

They’re also concentrated in the service industry or gig economy, in which workers have contact, directly or indirectly, with large numbers of people. These are the workers who are stocking the shelves of America’s stores, preparing and serving food in its restaurants, driving its Ubers, and manning its checkout counters. Their jobs tend to fall outside the bounds of paid-leave laws, even in states or cities that have them. Gershon emphasizes that having what feels like a head cold or mild flu—which COVID-19 will feel like to most healthy people—often isn’t considered a good reason to miss a shift by those who hold these workers’ livelihood in their hands.

Read more: https://www.theatlantic.com/health/a...=pocket-newtab

montréaliste Mar 7, 2020 7:33 PM

Just heard an interesting program on a French radio about "Typhoid Mary", a cook that used to work for wealthy families in NYC in the early 1900s.

She carried the typhus virus but was unaffected by the disease. Whenever she prepared food that was uncooked, she would pass on the disease and 3 people died and 50 plus were ill from it. She was quarantined and ordered by court to find other employment but continued her "vocation". A judge finally ruled on forcible confinement for the rest of her life, 26 years. Ouch.

austlar1 Mar 7, 2020 8:13 PM

A local hotel industry exec who posts on the Austin forum reports that his hotel and most other local hotels are contemplating layoffs and severe cost cutting measures. The SXSW cancellation left a huge hole that pretty much wipes March off the books for local hotels and downtown entertainment and food establishments. Supposedly there have been multiple convention and business meeting cancellations scheduled for later in the spring and summer. Austin built several thousand additional hotel rooms downtown (with more in the pipeline) over the past three or four years. Convention and tourism is probably now our second largest employment sector. I guess the same story will play out in place after place over the next several months.

SATURDAY AFTERNOON UPDATE- Took a drive down South Congress and through downtown this afternoon. I was surprised and pleased to see the sidewalks filled with pedestrians and the local businesses doing brisk business. It is a slightly chilly but sunny afternoon here in Austin. The bars and restaurants with sidewalk service were all looking busy. Obviously there are still a lot of visitors in town for the weekend. It would be nice to see activity of this sort remain somewhat normal in the days and weeks ahead.

rsbear Mar 7, 2020 10:01 PM

I don't have quantifiable data, but I've gone to my local grocery store (Studio City area of Los Angeles) every morning for the past three days and it seems quieter than normal. Especially this morning, being that it's Saturday. Inventory of everything but hand sanitizer has been great, until this morning when the Clorox wipes-types of products was low. Tons of toilet paper, even some on sale. Whereas my local Costco has been out of TP and sterilizing wipes for a week. Oh, gas has dropped about $.20 per gallon in the past three weeks.

SIGSEGV Mar 8, 2020 1:02 AM

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/Vf...=w1283-h962-no

Only saw two people wearing masks... fortunately there weren't very many old people there (with one notable exception...)


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