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-   -   How Is Covid-19 Impacting Life in Your City? (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showthread.php?t=242036)

destroycreate Apr 8, 2020 11:04 PM

Given how expensive all the desirable cities are, would we really mind at this point? I kind of like the idea of increased affordable housing in densely populated city centers at least for a couple of years.

Pedestrian Apr 8, 2020 11:06 PM

Quote:

San Francisco Pride should be canceled this year
By Brock Keeling@BrockKeeling Apr 8, 2020, 9:06am PDT

Despite being one of the biggest moneymakers in the city, this year’s San Francisco LGBTQ Pride Parade and related festivities should be canceled for 2020.

This year’s Pride, happening the weekend of June 27, is still continuing as planned. Fred Lopez, executive director for San Francisco Pride, told the San Francisco Chronicle that his team will move forward to have both the parade and the celebration take place while—somehow—following social distancing guidelines shortly after the SF shelter-in-place order is currently scheduled to end.

“[W]e at SF Pride are realistic that this year’s historic anniversary may look very different from what we had hoped for, and all options are on the table,” Lopez said in a statement, adding that he will work closely with our City Hall to “continually assess the outlook for gatherings like ours in the months to come.”

However, in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, quashing this year’s festivities entirely would prove a wise decision—or else risk putting the public in danger. SF Pride draws in nearly 1 million people annually. That’s a lot of people to cram into a city measuring roughly seven-by-seven miles. Those people, who come from around the world to celebrate, would need to use city infrastructure, like public transportation and city sidewalks, in heavy volume. And don’t forget about hotel taxes for which the city is most desperate.

In addition to the official Pride parade, which happens on the last Sunday in June, there’s the Dyke March and the Trans March, two tertiary events that also attract crowds.

The weekend-long celebration, which extends into the entire week, also sees bars, nightclubs, parks, theaters, and other areas busting at the seams with people. It’s too much this year. The Bay Area’s shelter-in-place is currently scheduled to end on May 3, but to view that date as anything other than a possible easing of certain restrictions would be foolhardy . . . .

https://cdn.vox-cdn.com/thumbor/pny5...1278.jpg.0.jpg
https://sf.curbed.com/2020/4/8/21213...%20this%20year

SIGSEGV Apr 8, 2020 11:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jtown,man (Post 8888291)
Chicago needs to open up the lakefront trail.

Within 15 seconds at an intersection, while biking, I witnessed 12 motorcycles blowing a red light running from a cop(Roosevelt and Wabash) and then about 7 teens blow the light right after them on bikes so I went ahead and went forward. One of the teens decided to yell out that I am a f*ggot.

We need safe places to bike. Period.

They're probably pissed the skate park is closed (and it sucks that some park district person has to camp out there in a SUV to make sure people don't use the skate park...).

HurricaneHugo Apr 8, 2020 11:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pedestrian (Post 8888405)

I would think that they're waiting for San Francisco or the state to extend the shelter at home orders or the ban on large gatherings.

Might be due to insurance purposes.

It's one thing to cancel it, another to cancel it because you can't legally hold the event.

I believe it's the same with San Diego's Comic Con.

jtown,man Apr 8, 2020 11:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SIGSEGV (Post 8888441)
They're probably pissed the skate park is closed (and it sucks that some park district person has to camp out there in a SUV to make sure people don't use the skate park...).

I've noticed that person(s). Man, what a job, I want it! lol

iheartthed Apr 8, 2020 11:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HurricaneHugo (Post 8888351)
I wonder if this pandemic will have a lasting effect on population density

Will people move out from big dense cities to the suburbs?

Somehow this correlation with population density got put into the conversation but it doesn't have a lot of support. Even in New York City the worst hit areas are in Queens, not Manhattan. Queens is the second least dense borough in NYC. The second hardest hit metro area (as of this post) is Detroit, which is not known for being high density. The third hardest hit metro area is New Orleans, also not a place known for being high density.

sopas ej Apr 9, 2020 12:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by iheartthed (Post 8888462)
Somehow this correlation with population density got put into the conversation but it doesn't have a lot of support. Even in New York City the worst hit areas are in Queens, not Manhattan. Queens is the second least dense borough in NYC. The second hardest hit metro area (as of this post) is Detroit, which is not known for being high density. The third hardest hit metro area is New Orleans, also not a place known for being high density.

Yeah, I don't think the issue is population density, but crowding, for the spread of COVID-19. Density and crowding aren't necessarily the same thing.

SIGSEGV Apr 9, 2020 12:50 AM

In Chicago the south side is the hardest hit, which is much less dense. My zip code (mostly high-rises) has lower per capita rates. Probably because we can all work from home and get our arugula delivered.

eaguir3 Apr 9, 2020 1:52 AM

Many people that live on the south side of Chicago don't have a car or depend on public transportation to get around. They're unable to buy in bulk either because of the issue of carrying bags around on a bus or simply because they can't afford to. This is primarily true in the African American neighborhoods.

There is also an issue with young black south siders still hanging out with large groups of friends. Not sure if they are unaware someone with no symptoms can spread the virus but I assume these same kids are the ones spreading the virus to their older family members. There are so many factors involved in the rapid spread on the south side of Chicago.

I've also seen stats of a spike in crime. Possibly because of the nicer weather and the fact there are so many people not working. It's like a perfect storm brewing. I hope I'm wrong.

bnk Apr 9, 2020 1:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SIGSEGV (Post 8888498)
In Chicago the south side is the hardest hit, which is much less dense. My zip code (mostly high-rises) has lower per capita rates. Probably because we can all work from home and get our arugula delivered.

Its well recognized in the medical community that there a lot more co morbidity's esp diabetes, hypertension, renal impairment from said issues and morbid obesity that is the issue here in some populations. Add up ,fact that more people reside in a residence than usual and add the fact that social distancing is less likely to happen in these areas.

I don't think it is not access to medical care. Everyone gets treated the same if they can pay or not. Its one of the first signs in all of the hospitals from the main entrance and the ER entrance in multiple languages. You don't need healthcare insurance to get the best of the best treatment and they are not even expected nor even tried to get payment from.

Its illegal not to treat anyone actually.


Its an easy answer, and I provided the causes. No links needed. Just "Anecdotal" evidence and 30 years working in a hospital deems what I say is not even worthy of a link. But if you want to google it go for it.

craigs Apr 9, 2020 1:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HurricaneHugo (Post 8888448)
I would think that they're waiting for San Francisco or the state to extend the shelter at home orders or the ban on large gatherings.

Might be due to insurance purposes.

It's one thing to cancel it, another to cancel it because you can't legally hold the event.

I believe it's the same with San Diego's Comic Con.

Let's just say the difference between a void contract and a breach of contract is huge.

Crawford Apr 9, 2020 12:37 PM

It looks like NYC's cases overwhelmingly stem from Europe. This must have been circulating for months earlier:

Most New York Coronavirus Cases Came From Europe, Genomes Show
Travelers seeded multiple cases starting as early as mid-February, genomes show.
https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/08/s...e-genomes.html

So probably originated due to heavy European cross-pollination, but wasn't noticed until it started affecting those without the interactions, but with preexisting conditions.

pdxtex Apr 9, 2020 2:06 PM

Earlier!!! I think the coasts ended up with a one two punch from across the respective oceans. Stanford researchers are theorizing that California's low numbers might be attributed to a bit of herd immunity if covid starting circulating last fall undetected like we both talked about. FAA records show California regularly gets 8000 daily passengers from mainland China during the fall and winter months...

awholeparade Apr 9, 2020 2:08 PM

I'm not considering selling my condo, but I do think that I would be handling this period much better if I had a yard and a driveway. I'm a big mountain biker and I could be screwing around in those areas on my bike, if I had them. Instead, I have to pass through common areas and multiple doors just to get outside. I bought my place specifically to be right by a great urban park, but because I'm in a dense area (for Denver), my street has the same amount of activity as ever (going to/from the park), and I don't feel comfortable going to the park because it's so packed. Again, I'm not considering selling and moving, but these are thoughts that I've had.

dave8721 Apr 9, 2020 2:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Crawford (Post 8888710)
It looks like NYC's cases overwhelmingly stem from Europe. This must have been circulating for months earlier:

Most New York Coronavirus Cases Came From Europe, Genomes Show
Travelers seeded multiple cases starting as early as mid-February, genomes show.
https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/08/s...e-genomes.html

So probably originated due to heavy European cross-pollination, but wasn't noticed until it started affecting those without the interactions, but with preexisting conditions.

Research shows it probably started mid-February. Not "months earlier" (months earlier from now but not months earlier than thought, more like a couple of weeks earlier than we thought). If it was earlier we would have known. NYC's "die at home" is ten times the normal rate. If nurses and doctors were dropping dead in droves months ago people would have noticed (doctors and nurses probably would have noticed at least). People started getting exposed in mid-February (well before any lock downs) so some would start showing symptoms around the end of February/beginning of March but in small enough numbers to not raise any alarms (plus there was no testing).

Handro Apr 9, 2020 3:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by awholeparade (Post 8888783)
I'm not considering selling my condo, but I do think that I would be handling this period much better if I had a yard and a driveway. I'm a big mountain biker and I could be screwing around in those areas on my bike, if I had them. Instead, I have to pass through common areas and multiple doors just to get outside. I bought my place specifically to be right by a great urban park, but because I'm in a dense area (for Denver), my street has the same amount of activity as ever (going to/from the park), and I don't feel comfortable going to the park because it's so packed. Again, I'm not considering selling and moving, but these are thoughts that I've had.

Had the same thoughts. I have no plans to leave the city, but I definitely would appreciate the space/privacy a house, a yard, and a garage would offer right now. Sick of trying to open common doorknobs in our condo building with my hand in my jacket pocket!

Quote:

Originally Posted by dave8721 (Post 8888829)
Research shows it probably started mid-February. Not "months earlier" (months earlier from now but not months earlier than thought, more like a couple of weeks earlier than we thought). If it was earlier we would have known. NYC's "die at home" is ten times the normal rate. If nurses and doctors were dropping dead in droves months ago people would have noticed (doctors and nurses probably would have noticed at least). People started getting exposed in mid-February (well before any lock downs) so some would start showing symptoms around the end of February/beginning of March but in small enough numbers to not raise any alarms (plus there was no testing).

The first confirmed case in the US was in Chicago's Chinatown in mid-to-late January. This was definitely in New York (and elsewhere) at the beginning of the year. I wouldn't be surprised if the same number of people who have it in the US right now had it at some point in early February but just didn't know what it was.

mhays Apr 9, 2020 4:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by awholeparade (Post 8888783)
I'm not considering selling my condo, but I do think that I would be handling this period much better if I had a yard and a driveway. I'm a big mountain biker and I could be screwing around in those areas on my bike, if I had them. Instead, I have to pass through common areas and multiple doors just to get outside. I bought my place specifically to be right by a great urban park, but because I'm in a dense area (for Denver), my street has the same amount of activity as ever (going to/from the park), and I don't feel comfortable going to the park because it's so packed. Again, I'm not considering selling and moving, but these are thoughts that I've had.

Stairs help. A 25-minute set of stairs up / elevator down can take the place of normal exercise. Actually I find I'm working harder with stairs. All with hand sanitizer and a mask for the elevator (but not the stairs!) of course.

jd3189 Apr 9, 2020 4:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pdxtex (Post 8888781)
Earlier!!! I think the coasts ended up with a one two punch from across the respective oceans. Stanford researchers are theorizing that California's low numbers might be attributed to a bit of herd immunity if covid starting circulating last fall undetected like we both talked about. FAA records show California regularly gets 8000 daily passengers from mainland China during the fall and winter months...

This may be true. I had a cold from late January through early February. Went to the university clinic. They said it was an upper respiratory tract infection. Told me to just rest and drink lots of fluids. It took me about two weeks afterward to get rid of it.

I knew it was coronavirus ( due to the winter season), but I don’t know if it was COVID-19. If it was the latter, I’m essentially immune to this thing now and I also unknowingly spread it among my classmates through February.

10023 Apr 9, 2020 4:50 PM

I now spend at least an hour per day shopping for groceries because of social distancing and long lines to enter shops.

eschaton Apr 9, 2020 5:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10023 (Post 8888991)
I now spend at least an hour per day shopping for groceries because of social distancing and long lines to enter shops.

You still grocery shop on a daily basis? We've been trying to get to the store only once every two weeks or so.


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