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nergie Jun 18, 2006 5:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BVictor1

Kick ass, I hate that old bridge when I drive home. But, they should save the old bridge for Daley's bike paths, it would make a great river crossing for the bike trails.

Chicago2020 Jun 18, 2006 5:11 AM

Are these projects still alive???

http://www.architecture.org/drivesit...ein/35-1lg.jpg
http://www.architecture.org/drivesit...ght/CR-4lg.jpg

--------------------------------------------------------------------
And I thought these were cool!!! The NEW Dan Ryan

http://www.il-asla.org/Awards/2004/W...DanRyan-05.jpg
http://www.il-asla.org/Awards/2004/W...DanRyan-01.jpg
http://www.il-asla.org/Awards/2004/W...DanRyan-03.jpg
http://www.il-asla.org/Awards/2004/W...DanRyan-08.jpg
http://www.il-asla.org/Awards/2004/W...DanRyan-07.jpg
http://www.il-asla.org/Awards/2004/W...DanRyan-06.jpg
http://www.il-asla.org/Awards/2004/W...DanRyan-04.jpg

VivaLFuego Jun 18, 2006 2:55 PM

^doubt it, they need that land to add more lanes of traffic, congestion, and pollution. viva l car.

spyguy Jun 18, 2006 3:09 PM

This might be a little off-topic, but interesting to know
 
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/n...l=chi-news-hed

How Hastert benefited from sale
Planned highway could sweeten asset near Plano


By James Kimberly and Andrew Zajac, Tribune staff reporters. James Kimberly reported from Chicago and Andrew Zajac from Washington; Tribune staff reporters Mike Dorning and Ray Gibson contributed to t
Published June 18, 2006

The complex structure of a real estate transaction in Kendall County last December left House Speaker Dennis Hastert with a seven-figure profit and in prime position to reap further benefits as the exurban region west of Chicago continues its prairie-fire growth boosted by a Hastert-backed federally funded proposed highway.

Instead of cash, Hastert (R-Ill.) took most of his share of the proceeds in land, some of it less than 2 miles from the parcels he and two partners in a land trust sold for nearly $5 million to a developer who plans to build more than 1,500 homes and commercial space on the property near Little Rock and Galena roads in Plano.

Hastert received five-eighths of the proceeds of the sale, which worked out to a profit of more than $1.5 million for him on property that he and his partners accumulated in a little more than three years.

.....

Proposed Prairie Parkway

Karpus downplayed the impact of the proposed Prairie Parkway, which would run north and south through Kendall County, noting that property prices began rising well before the proposed highway became a serious planning issue. The proposed road is designed to connect Interstate Highways 80 and 88.

Mandel Manion, who has sold real estate in the Plano area since 1991, said the market for farmland really took off in the last year and a half.

Manion said farmers tell her that developers knock on their doors unsolicited and offer to buy their land for $35,000 to $40,000 an acre.

"Maybe the Prairie Parkway has something to do with it, I don't know," Manion said. "I would guess it probably doesn't hurt."

Hastert's family paid $11,000 per acre in 2002 for some of the land he and his partners subsequently sold in December for $36,000 per acre.

The speaker has long been a staunch supporter of the proposed Prairie Parkway and helped secure more than $200million in federal funding through an earmark in federal transportation legislation last year.

Hastert press secretary Ron Bonjean said it is wrong to think that the speaker's backing of the parkway could positively affect his property investments because they are 5 miles from the proposed path of the highway. "It's too far away to have an effect," Bonjean said, adding, "The speaker has bought land like every American has a right to. . . . He is not benefiting from the parkway."

Jan Strasma, chairman of Citizens Against the Sprawlway, which opposes the parkway, disputed Bonjean's reasoning.

"People don't want to live next to the expressway," Strasma said. "They want to live several miles away with easy access.

"If this were some other individual who wasn't in a position of power and influence you would say, `Gee, they were smart, they made some money,'" Strasma said. "In this case it just doesn't look right."

If the Kendall County Board gets its way, residents of the development would have quick access to the parkway via an interchange at Galena Road.

The board last month passed a resolution calling for the construction of an interchange there, although county officials say they don't have the money to pay for it.

County Engineer Francis Klaas said an interchange would not be built unless the state, the federal government or a private developer put up the money. The state of Illinois has said it has no plans to provide highway access at Galena Road.

the urban politician Jun 18, 2006 4:13 PM

^ Hastert's an ass.

I have no interest in a dirty scumbag whose sole purpose in life is to promote sprawl for his selfish, wasteful constituency.

Wheelingman04 Jun 19, 2006 12:26 AM

^ I can't stand him either.

the urban politician Jun 19, 2006 6:06 PM

I've also been wondering about the status of all those pedestrian bridges that were presented about 1 and 1/2 years ago--I was really impressed with all of them.

BTW, this new "bike-friendly" plan by Daley is more than just a little speech. It's a pretty detailed plan. If you're interested, here's the link:

http://www.bike2015plan.org/

OmegaPaladin Jun 21, 2006 10:24 AM

Prarie Parkway? More like the Hastert Honorary Highway. If they build it, they need to stop nearby development, which they are most certainly not doing. The bastard is disgraceful.

VivaLFuego Jun 21, 2006 3:00 PM

Prairie Parkway is egregious pork, not quite on the magnitude of the Bridge to Nowhere or its bastard son the Railroad to Nowhere, but it's bad news.

LA21st Jun 21, 2006 11:46 PM


I work for CDOT, and work with the process of pre construction for all transportation projects. I have a spreadsheet that has all projects (there must be about 100) over the next two years. I just focus on what is current, so I havent paid alot of attention to future projects.

35th over LSD sounds very famaliar, so does 67th street.

the urban politician Jun 22, 2006 11:37 PM

^ So whats the scoop on this stuff?

Frankie Jun 23, 2006 5:36 PM

From todays Trib

Pink Line is ready, even if riders aren't

By Virginia Groark
Tribune staff reporter
Published June 23, 2006


With signs posted at elevated train stations, pink stripes painted on support columns and motormen trained on the new route, the Chicago Transit Authority is ready for the Sunday launch of the Pink Line, its first new rail service since the Orange Line's debut in 1993.

Days before the rail route's inaugural run, however, many riders were scratching their heads, trying to figure out where the Pink Line will take them and whether it will lengthen or shorten their commute. Some hadn't been able to get schedule information; others fretted about how disabled riders will transfer to the Red Line.

Some knew nothing at all about the new "L" line, despite radio ads, posters on buses and signs in stations.

"There's still a lot of people who don't realize what this is," said Michael Pitula, public transit organizer for the Little Village Environmental Justice Organization, which opposes the line and has been passing out "Pink Stinks" fliers on trains. "I've met a lot of riders who think the CTA is just changing the Blue Line to a new color."

Wince Collins, a 29-year-old West Side resident who uses the Blue Line's Forest Park branch to get to his North Side retail job, is excited about the change, which will increase service on his branch of the Blue Line. The extra trains should reduce his waiting time for a train to 7 or 8 minutes from 15.

Shalini Gupta, 36, worries that the changes will lengthen her trip between her job at the University of Illinois at Chicago and Union Station, where she typically boards a Metra train to Aurora after taking the 54/Cermak branch from Polk Street to Clinton Street.

Such is the debate that has circled the Pink Line since last winter, when the CTA board approved a 180-day test to reroute the 54/Cermak branch, formerly called the Douglas branch, along the Paulina Connector. The recently rehabilitated stretch of track was last used for passenger service in the 1950s when the Douglas branch traveled on it.

Although CTA officials say the Pink Line will improve rail service dramatically to the West Side, Southwest Side and western suburbs, Pitula and other activists say the route change will make it more difficult for riders who are used to a direct trip to places such as O'Hare International Airport.

Under the plan, the vast majority of trains that travel along the Cermak corridor will no longer join the Blue Line's Forest Park branch at the Eisenhower Expressway, head east into the Loop and out to the airport. Instead, they will head north to Lake Street, joining the Green Line and turning east into the Loop on elevated tracks. After circling the Loop, they will return on the same route.

The exception will be 18 inbound and 18 outbound weekday Blue Line trains that will continue on the existing 54/Cermak branch route. Those trains will run every half-hour weekdays from 5:30 to 9:30 a.m. and 2:25 to 6:30 p.m. but will not run on weekends.

The addition of the Pink Line will enable the CTA to increase the number of weekday peak trains on the corridor, cutting waiting time to 7 1/2 minutes from 10 to 15 minutes. During non-peak hours and weekends, trains will run every 10 to 15 minutes, down from 15 to 20 minutes.

Weekday peak service on the Forest Park branch also will improve, cutting waiting times to 7 1/2 minutes from 15 minutes. During weekends and non-peak weekdays, trains will run every 7 1/2 to 10 minutes, down from 15 to 20 minutes.

Though the number of trains will increase on the Pink Line, the CTA intends to run trains with four cars, rather than eight, during rush hours, CTA spokeswoman Sheila Gregory said. That could result in crowded cars during rush hour.

Riders such as Gupta who want to go to the Racine, UIC-Halsted or Clinton stops from the Pink Line will have to transfer to a bus at Polk or transfer to a Forest Park train in the Loop. Catching a 54/Cermak branch train during peak times is another option, but Gupta worries about the infrequency of those trains. If she misses one, she must wait another 30 minutes and likely miss her connection with Metra.

"That's dicey," said Gupta, who tried in vain to get a new train schedule Monday at the Polk Street station.

In fact, detailed schedule information has been hard to find, posing a problem for Juana Sanchez, an office assistant to Ald. George Cardenas (12th), who has received calls from students wondering how they will get to UIC and other places.

"We don't have the routes and the information, so we don't even really know what to tell them," she said.

The Little Village group is concerned about increased travel times for Pink Line riders who want to get to the UIC-Halsted, Racine or Clinton stops or to O'Hare.

"How is it an improvement to substitute a train that only goes downtown in place of one that goes direct all the way to the airport?" Pitula said.

CTA officials said riders can transfer at the Clark/Lake stop, which they will reach 10 minutes faster on the Pink Line. Fewer than 2 percent of daily 54/Cermak riders travel between any of the 11 stations on the 54/Cermak branch and O'Hare, officials said.

Although some riders are concerned that the Pink Line will jam up the Loop system, CTA officials say computer models show there's enough capacity to run the trains on tracks now used by the Orange, Purple and Green Lines.

Others worry about people with disabilities, who now can transfer to the Red Line through a tunnel at the Jackson Street station without going outdoors. Pink Line riders who want to transfer to the Red Line will have to travel to the Library stop, leave the station and board the Red Line at the Jackson stop, said Kevin Irvine, transportation advocate for Equip for Equality. Another option, which requires an extra transfer, is to switch to the Blue Line at Clark/Lake, ride it to Jackson and transfer to the Red Line.

Some riders, including Maria Jamison, 30, believe the changes will improve their commute. Jamison now takes the 54/Cermak branch from Polk Street to the Brown Line at Clark/Lake. By CTA estimates, taking the Pink Line should get her to Clark/Lake 10 minutes quicker.

"I would be surprised if it makes my commute longer," she said.

nomarandlee Jul 4, 2006 8:45 AM

Amtrak sees return of Rockford passenger trains
 
most will not effect most here but some of those in Rockford might


http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/c...l=chi-news-hed


Amtrak sees return of Rockford passenger trains

By Liam Ford
Tribune staff reporter
Published July 3, 2006, 8:12 PM CDT


ROCKFORD -- With momentum building to expand passenger rail service in Illinois, opening a train line between Chicago and Rockford is more a question of when than if, a senior Amtrak official said Monday.

A vote by legislators last spring to double funding for Amtrak's state-subsidized lines in the 2007 Illinois budget provides financial support to restore rail service that last ran in 1981, officials said.

"If you guys want the service, it's not, Should we do it? It is, What are the next steps we need to do to get it done?" Joe McHugh, Amtrak's senior vice president for governmental affairs, said after a town hall-style meeting at the Rockford airport of backers of reopening the route.

An analysis in late 2004 put the cost of creating a Metra line to Rockford at $89 million, with annual passenger ticket sales bringing in $1.6 million, still $1.7 million short of annual costs.

If Amtrak restarts the service, federal law requires it to make up any shortfalls in the cost of running the line with state subsidies.

Illinois Transportation Secretary Timothy Martin plans to move forward soon with a request to Amtrak to restart service.

Officials backing three competing plans to bring either Amtrak or Metra rail service to the Rockford area appeared ready Monday to let the two passenger railroads figure out the best way to move ahead.

The Black Hawk line once ran from Chicago to Elmhurst, then on to cities including Rockford, Galena and Dubuque, Iowa. Officials said Amtrak could use existing Canadian National tracks to restore service to Rockford.

Proposals for Metra service would either go to Rockford through Elgin and Belvidere or through DeKalb County and southern Winnebago County to the Rockford airport.

"We want to at least be able to put two or three options on the table, with everybody saying these appear to be the best—now let's test them against Amtrak standards and Metra standards and find out if they fit," said Sen. Richard Durbin (D-Ill.), who organized the meeting at the airport with Rep. Donald Manzullo (R-Ill.).

Officials from several counties and cities that might benefit from the service spoke at the meeting. Some who have been backing particular proposals said they would be willing to work with others to make it happen.

"This community is ready to help make all of your jobs easier," Rockford Mayor Larry Morrissey said, adding that the competing plans should be brought under one umbrella.

"We've been in meetings before where everyone is decrying everyone else's proposal," McHugh said. "The fact that your folks understand the need for regionalism, and you've got to sort of get started somewhere, somehow, and you take steps, I think that's very mature and appropriate for this type of discussion."

Manzullo said bringing rail service back will help keep the Rockford area economically viable.

"I can't think of any item that would do more to invigorate economic growth and vitality and interest in making people want to not just continue to live in Rockford and invest, but to have their children stay here, than to have the railroad come to Rockford," he said.

lford@tribune.com

Chicago Shawn Jul 6, 2006 5:02 PM

^Great news and About time service is restored. Glad to see this moving into seroius planning stages now. Rockford's new mayor should be commended in his hard work in forging this ahead. He really is the beacon of light saving that stagnet city.

Wheelingman04 Jul 6, 2006 11:13 PM

Yes, that is great news.

spyguy Jul 10, 2006 11:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LA21st
I work for CDOT, and work with the process of pre construction for all transportation projects. I have a spreadsheet that has all projects (there must be about 100) over the next two years. I just focus on what is current, so I havent paid alot of attention to future projects.

35th over LSD sounds very famaliar, so does 67th street.

Maybe the time to bring it up:

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/l...l=chi-news-hed

Quote:

The city has secured about $6 million in federal funding to add a pedestrian bridge over South Lake Shore Drive at 41st Street and to design replacement bridges at 35th and 43rd Streets on the Drive, Steele said. The bridges, whose winning designs were selected from a CDOT-sponsored international competition, will be built over the next several years, he said.

In addition, plans are set to build a pedestrian and bicycle underpass beneath Solidarity Drive near the Adler Planetarium on the Museum Campus. All $11 million needed for the project has been acquired, Steele said.
Were you able to find anything out?

SevenSevenThree Jul 11, 2006 5:41 AM

Does anyone have a hold of any renderings and specs of the new Howard St. station? I saw a quick glance tonight and wanted to see details of the project, which apparently has already started. I didnt notice outside of the reconfiguration of the platform crew houses and didnt think twice about it.

VivaLFuego Jul 11, 2006 6:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SevenSevenThree
Does anyone have a hold of any renderings and specs of the new Howard St. station? I saw a quick glance tonight and wanted to see details of the project, which apparently has already started. I didnt notice outside of the reconfiguration of the platform crew houses and didnt think twice about it.

havent seen anything bid....there's a little one on the first page here:
http://www.transitchicago.com/news/m...onstupdate.pdf

Basically, totally rebuilt: new, wider platforms, handicap accessible, and I think 2 or even 3 entrances/exits in the general vicinity, smoother integration with the bus turnaround and parking garage, etc.

SevenSevenThree Jul 11, 2006 6:27 AM

Thank you kindly.

I hope larger renderings and details are released. I wonder why things arent more visible with this particular project. The station NEEDS this and will do wonders for commuters as well as just the overall appearance of the immediate area. Thats my neighborhood station and I cant wait until completion.

VivaLFuego Jul 11, 2006 5:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SevenSevenThree
Thank you kindly.

I hope larger renderings and details are released. I wonder why things arent more visible with this particular project. The station NEEDS this and will do wonders for commuters as well as just the overall appearance of the immediate area. Thats my neighborhood station and I cant wait until completion.

It will be nice, it'll be a huge project, I think about $50 million, lots of track reallignment going on to. It should be a very nice intermodal transit center by the end.

There are also plans for modest renovations to other Red Line stations on the far north side (replacing those rotting canopies, cleaning up the station entrances, etc.)

Now if they could just remove the slow zones on the north end of the red line so it doesnt take 50+ minutes to get downtown...

SevenSevenThree Jul 11, 2006 10:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by VivaLFuego
Now if they could just remove the slow zones on the north end of the red line so it doesnt take 50+ minutes to get downtown...

Everything sounds good so far esp the prospects of cleaning up the other Red Line stops but good luck with the above quoted statement. I dont understand that slow zone deal when the Red Line is completely straight after Loyola going south. Maybe its something Im missing but it would be nice to not wait between stations for 20 minutes with nothing in front of us for a good 5 stops.

LA21st Jul 12, 2006 12:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by spyguy
Maybe the time to bring it up:

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/l...l=chi-news-hed



Were you able to find anything out?

Oh man, I forgot about this request. I just looked at that spreadsheet today.:D I will post some information on some of the more interesting ones tomorrow.

I think someone was asking me about the Van Buren bridge? Or Taylor Street? Maybe that was SSC.:shrug:

creamcityleo79 Jul 12, 2006 1:32 AM

Blue Line Train Derails btwn Damen and Racine stations.

http://www.cbs47.tv/news/national/st...2-6B3F0859701F

Chicago Shawn Jul 12, 2006 7:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LA21st
Oh man, I forgot about this request. I just looked at that spreadsheet today.:D I will post some information on some of the more interesting ones tomorrow.

I think someone was asking me about the Van Buren bridge? Or Taylor Street? Maybe that was SSC.:shrug:


That was me on the Taylor Street Bridge. I just wanted to know if CDOT looked at reusing the North Avenue bascule draw bridge for the restored Taylor Street crossing.

LA21st Jul 12, 2006 1:03 PM

I just talked to an engineer in Bridges. Thats a no, Shawn. CDOT has no more use for old material and they end up selling it scrap.

Chicago Shawn Jul 12, 2006 3:34 PM

^Damn! That bridge is far too beautiful to go to the scrap heap. :( Thanks for the update though.

spyguy Jul 12, 2006 7:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SevenSevenThree
Thank you kindly.

I hope larger renderings and details are released. I wonder why things arent more visible with this particular project. The station NEEDS this and will do wonders for commuters as well as just the overall appearance of the immediate area. Thats my neighborhood station and I cant wait until completion.

Are these accurate?
http://img341.imageshack.us/img341/3342/howard12rj.jpg
http://img341.imageshack.us/img341/6871/howard25ue.jpg
http://img341.imageshack.us/img341/2562/howard38fp.jpg

VivaLFuego Jul 12, 2006 8:08 PM

Yes that's what I've seen, though I've also heard that the full canopy over the platforms and track has been scaled back due to cost issues (similar to some of the redesigns of the new Brown Line stations). Nice big hi-res renderings, where'd you find those?

SevenSevenThree Jul 12, 2006 8:38 PM

Ah thanks spyguy for those. Ive heard about the canopy cutback also, which disappoints me. I think it could lend a great deal of "something" to the appearance of the station. They cut back the canopy BIG time on the brown line, esp the Chicago Ave station which Im slighty upset about. I never understood why they cut back so much of the canopy. Who wants to get rained on? Who wants to be beaten to death by the sun? I liked the canopy. I guess it depends on the materials, although they switched up on that too. Regardless, its a whole hell of a lot better than whats there now and thats most important. I also like the new entrances being right by the bus terminals. Sometimes, I have to turn into a track star to make the bus. Thanks again, VivaLFuego and spyguy.

SevenSevenThree Jul 12, 2006 8:41 PM

One more thing: I'd love to see alot more trees and flowers around the bus terminal storefronts, bus stops and the immediate vincinity. It needs it badly to counteract the immense amount of concrete and stone drawing in the heat. So much potential for Howard St...

trvlr70 Jul 12, 2006 8:47 PM

Chicago and Clark/Division CTA stops
 
I can't remember, but hasn't the Chicago Av. CTA station been rehabbed because it is in a touisty part of Chicago.

Is the Clark/Divison stop still disgusting?

VivaLFuego Jul 12, 2006 9:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by trvlr70
I can't remember, but hasn't the Chicago Av. CTA station been rehabbed because it is in a touisty part of Chicago.

Is the Clark/Divison stop still disgusting?

Chicago/Red Line was rehabbed a few years ago. The next Red Line station to be rehabbed will be Grand/State. Clark/Division is still disgusting, and has no concrete plans for renovation anytime soon (though it will probably be next, after Grand, but it's at least a few years off).

Jackson/Blue line is currently being renovated, and after that, the Clark/Lake/Blue Line platform will be renovated (again).

I'm not certain, but I think some improvements to Washington/Blue Line and the red line may be rolled into the Block 37 superstation and tunnel construction. I know the Washington/Red Line station will be removed as part of the B37 construction, but I'm not sure if the plan is to keep the current station at Monroe, or split the different and put one at Madison. Either way, there should be pedway connections between all of the surrounding mezanines, and B37.

Again I'm not certain about this, but I think the Monroe stations are generally being let to lie, under the hope that there will one day be a transit route under or over Monroe, so renovations to the current subways in the vicinty under State and Dearborn would be planned accordingly.

Since the city owns the subway tunnels, it would be nice if they took more initiative in renovating every subway station.....which I guess is another incentive to renew the central area TIF.

Loopy Jul 12, 2006 9:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by trvlr70
I can't remember, but hasn't the Chicago Av. CTA station been rehabbed because it is in a touisty part of Chicago.

Is the Clark/Divison stop still disgusting?

Affirmative. Still disgusting.

Chicago was the first of the downtown underground stations to be rehabbed. A few more have been done since. Grand and Harrison are now the worst looking stations after Clark/Division.

LA21st Jul 13, 2006 12:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by spyguy
Maybe the time to bring it up:

http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/l...l=chi-news-hed



Were you able to find anything out?

Sorry to be a downer (again) but these projects arent on CDOT's construction radar yet. It might not be that far off, but Im guessing those projects you are asking about wont start until 2008 at the earliest.

Jackson/Dearborn subway station is a little over 25% complete.

LA21st Jul 13, 2006 12:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by VivaLFuego
Chicago/Red Line was rehabbed a few years ago. The next Red Line station to be rehabbed will be Grand/State. Clark/Division is still disgusting, and has no concrete plans for renovation anytime soon (though it will probably be next, after Grand, but it's at least a few years off).

Jackson/Blue line is currently being renovated, and after that, the Clark/Lake/Blue Line platform will be renovated (again).

I'm not certain, but I think some improvements to Washington/Blue Line and the red line may be rolled into the Block 37 superstation and tunnel construction. I know the Washington/Red Line station will be removed as part of the B37 construction, but I'm not sure if the plan is to keep the current station at Monroe, or split the different and put one at Madison. Either way, there should be pedway connections between all of the surrounding mezanines, and B37.

Again I'm not certain about this, but I think the Monroe stations are generally being let to lie, under the hope that there will one day be a transit route under or over Monroe, so renovations to the current subways in the vicinty under State and Dearborn would be planned accordingly.

Since the city owns the subway tunnels, it would be nice if they took more initiative in renovating every subway station.....which I guess is another incentive to renew the central area TIF.

CDOT would love too, if they had the funds to do it.

VivaLFuego Jul 13, 2006 2:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LA21st
CDOT would love too, if they had the funds to do it.

The city could use TIF money rather than giving public money to private investors and developers in an unblighted area...but I understand thats not necessarily CDOT's decision. Good folk at CDOT.

LA21st Jul 13, 2006 2:36 AM

Thats not our call to use those funds. That belongs to our friends across LaSalle St at City Hall.:banana:

VivaLFuego Jul 20, 2006 1:19 AM

The following is a survey conducted as part of the research on the Carrol Ave. transitway:

http://www.surveymonkey.com/DisplayS...U=187881151555

This is from the River North Residents Association website:
http://www.rivernorthresidents.com/Transitway_Study.htm

Just find it interesting that 80% of people who live in that area, one of the densest, centrally located in the city, own cars.

There seems to be moderate transit usage for work trips, but nothing more, otherwise its all taxis and private autos and walking. Good to see the decently high walking numbers, at least.

the urban politician Jul 20, 2006 1:40 AM

^ Interesting data. It's a small survey, but it's actually promising.

A lot of people walk, naturally.

PT usage is decent, but if you think about it, these people often live so near to work that PT may not be necessary

Although about 1/4 of people are driving, lets not forget that a certain percentage of them may also be working in the suburbs.

All in all, the data is pretty promising. Thanks for providing it

VivaLFuego Jul 20, 2006 4:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by the urban politician
^ Interesting data. It's a small survey, but it's actually promising.

A lot of people walk, naturally.

PT usage is decent, but if you think about it, these people often live so near to work that PT may not be necessary

Although about 1/4 of people are driving, lets not forget that a certain percentage of them may also be working in the suburbs.

All in all, the data is pretty promising. Thanks for providing it

There's some potential there. It suggests that at least in the short term, Chicagoans are very willing to live in dense, walkable neighborhoods, and will take transit when it provides a simple/quick enough trip. All with the caveat, that they'd still really like to have a car, mostly for shopping and leisure. So maybe the parking blob pedestals are a-ok....though i wish they could pretty them up a bit more.

jjk1103 Jul 21, 2006 3:14 PM

........in reading the story in the Trib about the cost overruns on the Brown rehab........it looks like Krusei is in real trouble.

spyguy Jul 28, 2006 2:49 PM

Bombardier Finalizes Order Valued at $577 Million US for Rapid Transit Cars in Chicago
July 28, 2006

Bombardier Transportation announced today that it has finalized a major order for rapid transit cars from the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA), a contract valued at $577 million US (457 million euros). On May 10, the CTA Board had selected Bombardier as preferred bidder. The contract is for a base order of 206 rapid transit vehicles and CTA also exercised a first option for 200 additional vehicles for a total of 406 cars. The total number of cars involved could increase to 706 should CTA exercise all available options.

The new rapid transit cars will be the first in the CTA fleet to utilize alternating current (AC) propulsion, a technology that permits dynamic braking regeneration, lower energy and maintenance costs, and improved reliability. Bombardier was the first rail car builder to supply AC propulsion technology to transit authorities in the United States and Canada. The new fleet of cars also will be equipped with a special leveling system to ensure that access to the car floor is level with the station platform during boarding.

The contract calls for delivery of ten prototype cars 30 months after Notice to Proceed is given by the CTA. The prototypes will undergo nine months of revenue service testing before delivery of production series cars begins.

The CTA operates the second largest public transportation system in the United States, covering the city of Chicago and 40 surrounding suburbs. CTA trains provide about 500,000 customer trips each day via seven routes, 222 miles of track and 144 stations.

In North America, Bombardier Transportation is the leader in commuter rail, intercity, subway cars, automated rapid transit and automated guideway transit systems. It also maintains two of the largest multi-level commuter rail car fleets in Canada and the United States.

Bombardier Transportation has its global headquarters in Berlin, Germany and operations in over 60 countries. It has an installed base of approximately 97,000 cars and locomotives, primarily in Europe, the world's largest rail market. The company offers the broadest product portfolio and is recognized as the leader in the global rail sector.
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Busy Bee Jul 28, 2006 4:33 PM

I'm sorry, but between this and the new Metra Electric MU's, which are essentially just like a stainless Metra pull coach with a pantograph on top, I am really getting irritated with transport design in Chicago. It seems the rest of the world(including 2nd world) have rail fleet's that are appealing, forward looking, stylish design. This new L car is IDENTICAL to the 3200 on the outside, a design drafted by some engineer nearly 15 years ago! Some here have said that the no frills, utilitarian CTA L car is perfect for Chicago. I disagree completly. I'm not saying that we should have gotten some crazy bubbly shaped thing more suited for Thailand or anything, just some INNOVATION and CREATIVITY, or just a little bit of aesthetic consideration. Let's face it, it would not have taken much to snazzy up this design. Slight modifications to the cab front could have resulted in something more reflective of the year 2008! Would you have a problem buying and enjoying a brand new automobile(if you drive) that was styled like a 1991 Olsmobile Cutless Siera whatever? These new railcars will be 18 years old when they are delivered new, and assuming they last at least 30 years, we will be seeing a 1990 design in the year 2040, wow! Imagine how this industrial design we'll look then. How would you feel about the CTA if they were still running the 6000's in the year 2006?

This may seem like an overreaction to many, but I don;t see it like that. I am probably as equally interested in industrial design as I am architecture and urbanism. I know that at one time the likes of Raymond Loewy and Henry Dreyfuss reshaped the way American rail trasnportation looked, and America was known worldwide for having the most fantastic trains. We have gone from a legacy of cutting edge industrial design with beautiful color spectrums to outsourcing the doggiest rapid transit car on the globe(maybe behind Toronto) to one its' finest cities.

I just think it's extremely unfortunate that the Chicago area's legacy of stylish beautiful transport has dimensioned so greatly. No more orange, brown, cream or green of the IC(hell soon no more orange on the Metra Highliners either, replaced with Metra's blah blue); No more green and yellow of the CNW, more silver streak; Very little emphasis of South Shore orange and marroon(we've probably all seen pics of orange South Shore MU's down by Central Station with the skyline in the back, alot more interesting than more corrugated stainless); No more green and red of the North Shore Electroliner; No more Rock Island red, black and silver; No more green, cream and orange of early CTA, hell no more mint green either; remember when the buses were that green, lime and white scheme, I liked that... it sure would be in style now, but what do we have?... this lame go USA paint scheme of red white and blue, UGGH! Look around the world, fantastic paint jobs in Europe of transit vehicles, we're lucky if we have a strip of color on white buses or LRV's in many US cities, look at New York, LA, the list goes on) And these examples were only of commuter services, think of the landscape we've lost since the collapse of passenger rail in this country. B&O, NYC, GM&O, PRR, IC, Milwaukee Road, it gets depressing.

This is a long spout, but what I'm getting at is that we are getting the short end of the stick in terms of transport aesthetics. Our long history of innovative style has been replaced with design being an afterthought, and that is BAD for image. More worrisome is that so many don't even seem to notice, or defend the local agencies for having cars that "fit" Chicago. Please! If anything, they make the transport in the area look underfunded(which it is), unimpressive(Metra in particular), dowdy, DRAB and stuck in the past. It just seems that NO ONE is asking, "does this look cool"?... because they should. I fear that many aspects of overlooked American design is suffering because no one is asking this question. Walk around and notice how many things, not just architecture, looks like it was designed with no regard for style. Now go to Holland or Denmark and see the difference in a society where very little design is overlooked.

Let's just hope the NY style seating is an improvement and that the fake wood paneling doesn't skip the 3200 and reappear again.

VivaLFuego Jul 28, 2006 4:40 PM

^ good riddance to fake wood panelling!

VivaLFuego Jul 28, 2006 4:46 PM

^ You can thank former CTA President Paaswell for killing our unique Mercury Green, Croyden Cream, and Swamp Holley Orange color scheme, favoring the blah red, white, and blue of every other transit agency. How awesome was all the old CTA signage, in Futura fonts with the green and cream color schemes?

I think the lack of creative industrial design is indicative of a wider societal problem, a loss of the confidence and pride that we had back in the "good old days". Hence we wind up with the insultingly wretched olde tyme infill all over the city's northside rather than trying anything forward-looking. It's just not transport, such ways of thinking are all over the place, and of course the current climate against funding government means transit agencies do need to be budget conscious, so flashy design is one of the first things thrown out to save costs. The only way they're getting away with the Calatrava train station in NY is because the federal taxpayers are paying for it as part of the rubber stamp "reconstruction" efforts we like to do after major disasters (Katrina, etc.)

Personally, I like the exterior aesthetic of the 3200s, and think the ribbed stainless steel has an almost timeless elegance to it (witness the 2200s on the blue/pink lines, now 35 years old), so I don't mind if these look pretty similar.

ChicagoBruce Jul 28, 2006 4:55 PM

I disagree completely. I love the look of the CTA cars and hope they never change, unless they maybe revert to even older looks. I want no part of the some modern and futuristic design, I think that would look dumb.

They really need the poles throughout the car, so the people standing don’t have to be surrounding the door areas, but I also dislike the new seating arrangement. Since the vast majority of the system is above ground, it’s nice to be able to look the window easier.

Steely Dan Jul 28, 2006 4:58 PM

i for one LOVE the aesthetic of chicago's L cars and i am overjoyed by the fact that we will still be seeing this classic look in 2040! hopefully it will last forever. i'm still not sold on the side aisle seating, but it will be what it'll be. one of the things i like about the current L car seating configuration is the fact that we don't face each other across an aisle, it's easier to look out the window as you ride.

Skurry Jul 28, 2006 5:08 PM

The new layout is fine with me, the more seats the better. Rush hour is too crowded! I know they are expanding some of the brown/red line stops to accomidate trains with more cars, they need to do that with all stops. I can not tell you how many times I have had to "wait for the next train" because no more can fit in. Even when it's not packed you can't get a seat, after working all day long I really don't want to stand on a moving train. After all the construction is done in the loop there is going to be much more rider traffic. CTA needs to be prepared.

As far as an update in design, I couldn't agree more with the fact that our pub-trans seems outdated. Sometimes I feel like I'm stepping into a portal to the 70s. Both Metra and CTA need to change their whole look. We are entering into a new age, let's look like it.

Busy Bee Jul 28, 2006 5:11 PM

^Thank You.

whyhuhwhy Jul 28, 2006 5:22 PM

I agree, but it seems there is nothing we can do about it.


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