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-   -   How Is Covid-19 Impacting Life in Your City? (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showthread.php?t=242036)

mrnyc Oct 13, 2020 8:19 PM

^ yep reused banks are a thing -- the cle heinens was closed during covid and it i think it got some george floyd riot damage. it's back!

ps -- i have three old banks on our intersection. one is a drug store, one a museum and one is ... a bank! :haha:

Stay Stoked Brah Oct 13, 2020 8:24 PM

both those places are sick!

10023 Oct 13, 2020 8:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mrnyc (Post 9071842)
becuase opening and closing for 2wks when rates get too high in certain neighborhoods and wearing a mask and washing your hands is ruining everyones life. :rolleyes:

It’s more that closing for two weeks is pointless.

And no one is complaining about washing their hands. I did that a lot before all this, maybe that’s why I haven’t had it. And I wear a mask when I have to.

It’s the business closures and social distancing that ruin normal life.

mrnyc Oct 13, 2020 8:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10023 (Post 9071917)
It’s more that closing for two weeks is pointless.

And no one is complaining about washing their hands. I did that a lot before all this, maybe that’s why I haven’t had it. And I wear a mask when I have to.

It’s the business closures and social distancing that ruin normal life.

except the businesses are not closed, they are paused for 2wks to get a handle on super spreader events caused by your ilk only wearing a mask when you have to. :rolleyes:

besides, many people have a job where you can work remotely now, at least for a time, so its no effect at all on some, everyone is used to it now (ie., schools).

and as for social distancing ruining your life? maybe for you, but no doubt if you do it its saving somebody elses from health problems.

suburbanite Oct 13, 2020 8:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mrnyc (Post 9071932)
except the businesses are not closed, they are paused for 2wks to get a handle on super spreader events caused by your ilk only wearing a mask when you have to. :rolleyes:

besides, many people have a job where you can work remotely now, at least for a time, so its no effect at all on some, everyone is used to it now (ie., schools).

and as for social distancing ruining your life? maybe for you, but no doubt if you do it its saving somebody elses from health problems.

This kind of sentiment is pretty dismissive of the massive number of people who live paycheck to paycheck working in the service industry. I find that those who make these public policy decisions and others who make a living behind a computer screen have tended to very quickly switch to promoting the "no one can ever get sick again" mentality. It's much easier to casually dismiss just two weeks of shutting down while sitting in a position of relative economic security.

iheartthed Oct 13, 2020 8:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10023 (Post 9071917)
And no one is complaining about washing their hands. I did that a lot before all this, maybe that’s why I haven’t had it. And I wear a mask when I have to.

It is well documented that the virus is airborne, and most person-to-person transmission occurs through the air. It's like you haven't read a single thing about what has been learned about the virus's transmission in 8 months, but keep derailing the thread with your Trumpian theories.

chris08876 Oct 13, 2020 9:55 PM

N.J. reports 993 new COVID-19 cases, 7 more deaths. Hospitalizations above 600 for 7th day.

Quote:

New Jersey on Tuesday reported 993 more coronavirus positive tests and seven additional deaths, marking the fourth time in six days the state has announced more than 800 cases.

Meanwhile, hospitalizations related to COVID-19 across the state were above 600 for the seventh straight day.

And the statewide rate of transmission held steady at 1.16 after declining gradually over the past week, though that’s still above the critical benchmark of 1 that indicates the outbreak here is growing. The rate has been above 1 for more than five weeks.

“Make no mistake: We are not out of the woods yet,” Gov. Phil Murphy said while announcing the latest figures during an event at a brewery in Hillsborough, where he announced $100 million in new economic recovery funding. “We still have work to do to beat this virus."
Pa. and N.J. are among the states trying to stave off a second coronavirus wave

Quote:

The average number of new coronavirus infections being diagnosed in Pennsylvania and New Jersey showed no sign of slowing Monday, even after warnings last week from officials advising the public to double down on safety practices.

Both states had higher new case count averages this week than last Monday, according to an Inquirer data analysis — and are part of a trend of increases both nationally and in the Northeast.

New York has also begun fighting an emerging surge; over the weekend, new restrictions took effect in parts of New York City. New case counts continued rising in other states — in the middle of the country, including in North Dakota, South Dakota, Wisconsin, and Nebraska, and in mountain states, including Montana and Utah.

As of Monday, the United States had recorded almost 7.8 million cases and was nearing 215,000 deaths, according to Johns Hopkins University.

[...]
=================
1. https://www.nj.com/coronavirus/2020/...r-7th-day.html
2. https://www.inquirer.com/news/corona...-20201012.html

JManc Oct 13, 2020 10:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10023 (Post 9071612)

That regular Joe’s 30s are still worth more than his 80s. This isn’t even that controversial - an actuary or Britain’s own National Health Service would implicitly say the same thing when they ascribe a monetary value to a life.

People with a conscience do not look at the aged as depreciating assets. I agree that lockdowns should be scaled back and people should be allowed to use their best judgement (within reason) but this cavalier disregard for a huge subset of the population are why have lockdowns and restrictions.

The NHS has to make these shitty distinctions because it's a nationalized healthcare system and thus prioritize finite financial resources.

CaliNative Oct 14, 2020 12:17 AM

Some of the countries that have almost contained their outbreaks because of good public health practices (masks, social distancing, contact tracing): Singapore, New Zealand, Greece, S. Korea, Uruguay. There are others. Now these countries can open up with caution and can get "herd immunity" from a vaccine that should be available next year rather than people getting sick from the virus. If the U.S. had stuck with correct public health practices the economy would be open and much better off now and people would be going back to work. In New Zealand life is back to normal and viral rates are so low that they don't need to wear masks. The U.S. should have followed these examples of correct public health measures. We would be OK by now and the number of deaths would have been much lower. Needless deaths. When you can't go to work it is because we didn't listen to the scientific experts. Public health became a political football.

canucklehead2 Oct 14, 2020 12:57 AM

I'm immune compromised (found that out late last year just before COVID-19) so I'm very anxious and careful when going out these days which isn't often. Masks on, hands washed.

Movie theatres used to be a 2-3 times a week activity for me, now even though it's open I don't visit. Instead I bought myself a full HD projector and a 100 inch screen.

Most people where I live currently don't take it seriously and don't wear masks or wash their hands so naturally these places have lost my business forever including the grocery store where I was attacked on July 10 for wearing a mask...

canucklehead2 Oct 14, 2020 12:58 AM

And since the pandemic serious crime and violent crime is up up up... https://edmontonjournal.com/news/loc...-crime-in-2020

10023 Oct 14, 2020 6:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JManc (Post 9072082)
People with a conscience do not look at the aged as depreciating assets. I agree that lockdowns should be scaled back and people should be allowed to use their best judgement (within reason) but this cavalier disregard for a huge subset of the population are why have lockdowns and restrictions.

The NHS has to make these shitty distinctions because it's a nationalized healthcare system and thus prioritize finite financial resources.

As opposed to America’s infinite financial resources for healthcare? This is why healthcare costs are out of control.

We are all depreciating assets from the moment we reach adulthood.

Is there anyone here who wouldn’t give up 10 years at the end of life to have the last 10 years to live over again? If not then I suspect you’re lying, or at least not being honest with yourself.

10023 Oct 14, 2020 6:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by canucklehead2 (Post 9072267)
I'm immune compromised (found that out late last year just before COVID-19) so I'm very anxious and careful when going out these days which isn't often. Masks on, hands washed.

Movie theatres used to be a 2-3 times a week activity for me, now even though it's open I don't visit. Instead I bought myself a full HD projector and a 100 inch screen.

Most people where I live currently don't take it seriously and don't wear masks or wash their hands so naturally these places have lost my business forever including the grocery store where I was attacked on July 10 for wearing a mask...

You used to go to the movies 2-3 times per week, and now have a 100-inch TV screen? No offense, but I am genuinely curious, is your immune condition linked to obesity, or inactivity/too much time indoors generally?

10023 Oct 14, 2020 6:29 AM

Think about what students are going through.

It’s late October in Madison, WI. It’s cold and dark out. You live in a cramped dorm or share a messy apartment with some roommate you barely get along with. Bars are effectively closed (need a reservation, very strictly over 21). You can’t really find a place to work or study because of social distancing at libraries, etc., so no just dropping in to Helen C. White to post up with your laptop and get some social interaction.

They are going to lose more students to suicide than Covid.

Pedestrian Oct 14, 2020 7:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10023 (Post 9072489)
You used to go to the movies 2-3 times per week, and now have a 100-inch TV screen? No offense, but I am genuinely curious, is your immune condition linked to obesity, or inactivity/too much time indoors generally?

If it were, does that mean the person is guilty and therefore expendable in your view?

Isn't that reminiscent of the prevailing opinion in another European country in the 1930s?

JManc Oct 14, 2020 7:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10023 (Post 9072488)
As opposed to America’s infinite financial resources for healthcare? This is why healthcare costs are out of control.

We are all depreciating assets from the moment we reach adulthood.

Is there anyone here who wouldn’t give up 10 years at the end of life to have the last 10 years to live over again? If not then I suspect you’re lying, or at least not being honest with yourself.

This sounds like Gordon Gekko with a hint of Nietzsche...

SIGSEGV Oct 14, 2020 7:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10023 (Post 9072490)
Think about what students are going through.

It’s late October in Madison, WI. It’s cold and dark out. You live in a cramped dorm or share a messy apartment with some roommate you barely get along with. Bars are effectively closed (need a reservation, very strictly over 21). You can’t really find a place to work or study because of social distancing at libraries, etc., so no just dropping in to Helen C. White to post up with your laptop and get some social interaction.

They are going to lose more students to suicide than Covid.

Pretty sure all the students in dorms have already been sent home.

Pedestrian Oct 14, 2020 7:39 PM

Quote:

Goodbye, Sunny Florida. Hello, Frigid Winter. Covid Strands Canadian Snowbirds
By Paul Vieira
Oct. 14, 2020 12:08 pm ET

For the first time in a quarter-century, Carol Barlow and her husband, Dale, won’t escape the Canadian winter.

Normally, the Barlows climb into their car in November and high-tail out of Davidson, Saskatchewan, a farming town in the Canadian prairies where the winter temperature averages about 7 degrees Fahrenheit. Their destination is sunny Mesa, Ariz., where they own a mobile home.

Like many of the million-strong flock of Canadian snowbirds, the Barlows have been thwarted by the coronavirus. In March, the U.S.-Canada border was closed to land crossings by tourists going either direction. A reopening isn’t immediately in the cards, Canadian officials have said, and the federal government has a travel advisory discouraging all nonessential travel abroad.

So this winter, Ms. Barlow is stocking up on sweaters because she and her husband are trading balmy Arizona sunshine for Osoyoos, British Columbia, just north of the Washington state border, where the average winter temperature is 32. “We think we are safer in Canada,” says Ms. Barlow, who is 77 years old. She knows it will snow in Osoyoos, “but it should be gone the next day,” she says.

The Canadian Snowbird Association says its members are retired or semiretired people who travel outside of Canada for 31 or more consecutive nights a year, mostly in the winter. The group estimates that 60% gravitate to Florida, with sizable contingents also heading to Arizona and Texas.

“We really find winter to be very unpleasant—not just the weather but the shoveling of the snow,” says Jacques Caron , 71, a retired financial consultant from the Montreal area. “And the driving is god-awful.”

He and his wife, Elaine Poirier , spend half the year at a property they bought in 2016 in Sebastian, Fla., on the Atlantic coast, and the rest in their trailer in a private campground about 40 miles east of Montreal. “It’s a different lifestyle,

Some RV owners are eyeing British Columbia, where winter isn’t as harsh. Canada’s westernmost province is home to some 100 year-round campgrounds with RV hookups, many of them on Vancouver Island and the Gulf Islands . . . .

Although the land border is closed, Canadians are allowed to fly into the U.S., so long as they haven’t visited certain countries and regions in the 14 days before . . . .

https://www.wsj.com/articles/covid-s...s&page=1&pos=1

The article also notes that some Canadians have an even bigger problem besides the travelling restrictions: They no longer own any winter clothes.

Pedestrian Oct 14, 2020 7:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SIGSEGV (Post 9073204)
Pretty sure all the students in dorms have already been sent home.

Not in China. Guinea pigs there are kept in dorms, not cages:

Quote:

Chinese Firm Gives Experimental Covid Vaccines to Students
By Chao Deng
Updated Oct. 14, 2020 12:54 pm ET

China is expanding distribution of its coronavirus vaccines outside of clinical trials, with a state-owned company offering them to students going abroad amid a campaign by officials to boost public confidence in homegrown inoculations.

China National Biotec Group Co., a division of state-owned Sinopharm that is developing two Covid-19 vaccines, was giving them free to Chinese students planning to study abroad, according to a company website and students who applied for it.

The offer appears to be the latest example of the company using an emergency-use approval to distribute vaccines to hundreds of thousands of people outside of clinical trials . . . .

As China prepares to roll out its vaccines for the public as early as next month, many Western health experts and pharmaceutical companies warn that its government and companies are potentially endangering public health by releasing unproven shots . . . .

. . . China has already injected hundreds of thousands of people with vaccines outside of clinical trials, including the two being developed by Sinopharm, under an “emergency-use” approval that began in July. The third vaccine approved for emergency use is being developed by private Chinese firm Sinovac . . . .

Yiwu He, the chief innovation officer at the University of Hong Kong, is working on his own Covid-19 vaccine candidate. He said he views China’s leading vaccines as relatively safe because they are based on older vaccine-making technologies that use viruses that have been inactivated, or killed, to trigger an immune response in the body. Newer technologies behind leading vaccine candidates in the U.S. and the U.K. have less of a track record, he said.

Ultimately, the reason Chinese people are comfortable getting injected, Mr. He said, is that they believe in the government’s ability to shepherd Covid-19 vaccinations successfully . . . .
https://www.wsj.com/articles/chinese...s&page=1&pos=1

TWAK Oct 15, 2020 1:28 AM

It's still not impacting things very much besides wearing masks and 30% seating (or something). This summer was basically the same...fires...bay area boats....ect.

chris08876 Oct 15, 2020 2:00 AM

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...0c92f05000.png

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...8e6c225fda.png

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...d6ae3cb905.png

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...83cf23e95b.png

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...7e118ddda8.png

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...8f55d98506.png

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...66f34fccf1.png

All via nyc.gov covid stats tracker

Acajack Oct 15, 2020 2:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pedestrian (Post 9073205)
https://www.wsj.com/articles/covid-s...s&page=1&pos=1

The article also notes that some Canadians have an even bigger problem besides the travelling restrictions: They no longer own any winter clothes.

First world problems...

xzmattzx Oct 15, 2020 3:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by CaliNative (Post 9072217)
Some of the countries that have almost contained their outbreaks because of good public health practices (masks, social distancing, contact tracing): Singapore, New Zealand, Greece, S. Korea, Uruguay. There are others. Now these countries can open up with caution and can get "herd immunity" from a vaccine that should be available next year rather than people getting sick from the virus. If the U.S. had stuck with correct public health practices the economy would be open and much better off now and people would be going back to work. In New Zealand life is back to normal and viral rates are so low that they don't need to wear masks. The U.S. should have followed these examples of correct public health measures. We would be OK by now and the number of deaths would have been much lower. Needless deaths. When you can't go to work it is because we didn't listen to the scientific experts. Public health became a political football.

Isn't the economy open in the US? What exactly is taking place in South Korea or New Zealand that is not taking place in the US? If anything, I thought that people were complaining that the US opened the economy back up too soon, not that it's still closed even today.

Also, doesn't Sweden also not need to wear masks, for doing the opposite and letting the coronavirus run its course moreso than other countries? Photos of Stockholm in July show packed streets, with no masks, and old people out and about just like young people.

CaliNative Oct 15, 2020 5:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pedestrian (Post 9073191)
If it were, does that mean the person is guilty and therefore expendable in your view?

Isn't that reminiscent of the prevailing opinion in another European country in the 1930s?

Quote:

Originally Posted by xzmattzx (Post 9073717)
Isn't the economy open in the US? What exactly is taking place in South Korea or New Zealand that is not taking place in the US? If anything, I thought that people were complaining that the US opened the economy back up too soon, not that it's still closed even today.

Also, doesn't Sweden also not need to wear masks, for doing the opposite and letting the coronavirus run its course moreso than other countries? Photos of Stockholm in July show packed streets, with no masks, and old people out and about just like young people.

My point was that the countries that shut down and used social distancing/masks for a while and didn't open up prematurely until case counts fell to negligible are doing OK. The U.S. gave up early on these measures and now we are going way up again in cases. Herd immunity policies without vaccines/therapeuticswill just kill and sicken millions. And the "immunity" gained may not last long, since the virus will probably evolve into new strains like the common cold and flu. Each year we will need a new vaccine. Herd immunity is a terrible idea without vaccines or therapeutics. Nearly all the public health experts including Doc. Fauci say herd immunity is a terrible strategy. Plus the economy will stay depressed as long as the virus is out of control. Older people have the money but they will not go out and spend with the virus out of control because they are terrified of catching it. Control the virus by good public health practices, then open up. We gave up on this and now we are in trouble again, as is much of Europe.

10023 Oct 15, 2020 5:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TWAK (Post 9073601)
It's still not impacting things very much besides wearing masks and 30% seating (or something). This summer was basically the same...fires...bay area boats....ect.

You must lead a very different life to mine. And obviously cities are impacted to a much, much greater degree.

Acajack Oct 15, 2020 12:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10023 (Post 9073788)
You must lead a very different life to mine. And obviously cities are impacted to a much, much greater degree.

I am a married guy with kids who lives in the suburbs, with 100% capacity to work at home and be paid in full, and the same for my wife. No one around me has caught COVID.

And yet this virus (and especially the reactions and measures in response to it) has had a pretty big impact on my life.

Like not being able to see my parents (who don't live that far away) for months on end, to the death of a very important family member for whom we haven't even been able to organize a proper funeral.

Just two examples.

chris08876 Oct 19, 2020 1:53 AM

Gov. Cuomo unveils New York coronavirus vaccine plan, prioritization phases

Video Link


Quote:

Gov. Cuomo said Sunday phases will be used to decide when vaccines will be distributed to certain groups. The first prioritization phase would go to high-risk individuals and front-line workers.

someone123 Oct 22, 2020 5:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Acajack (Post 9073866)
Like not being able to see my parents (who don't live that far away) for months on end, to the death of a very important family member for whom we haven't even been able to organize a proper funeral.

Just two examples.

Pretty similar to my situation. I consider myself one of the luckiest possible people around as far as covid goes. But it's still caused a bunch of problems, the most serious being difficulties with visiting family members. I think the elderly family members have been hit the hardest with loneliness. I don't know of anybody in my social circle who has gotten covid but I know a few people who lost their jobs.

I've also noticed I have a lot of friends I used to occasionally see when out doing things I no longer do, and it's hard to organize life now in a way that preserves those relationships. That was not a big deal for the first month or two but I wonder what will be left of these social ties across our society 6 months from now.

JManc Oct 22, 2020 7:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by someone123 (Post 9082096)
Pretty similar to my situation. I consider myself one of the luckiest possible people around as far as covid goes. But it's still caused a bunch of problems, the most serious being difficulties with visiting family members. I think the elderly family members have been hit the hardest with loneliness. I don't know of anybody in my social circle who has gotten covid but I know a few people who lost their jobs.

I've also noticed I have a lot of friends I used to occasionally see when out doing things I no longer do, and it's hard to organize life now in a way that preserves those relationships. That was not a big deal for the first month or two but I wonder what will be left of these social ties across our society 6 months from now.

They will suffer drastically. I could not imagine going through this single and in my 20's...prime social years. I've noticed people having become borderline paranoid hypochondriac even towards friends and family they know are taking similar precautions. I think the enduring effects on social interactions will be far more damaging than the actual virus itself.

LA21st Oct 22, 2020 8:35 PM

I used to fly to Chicago once a year to visit friends and stay at their houses. That's out, and who knows how long.

In LA, some friends won't meet anywhere anymore. Some do, but when I go, it's hard to think about the virus and I never truly feel at ease. These aren't even large gatherings. Maybe 3-5?

I've been invited to stuff, but I'm weary so I don't go. It's abosuletly crushing when you think about it and what the future is. Luckily, I hike pretty hard 3 days a week on less crowded trails where it feels somewhat safer. I won't give that up.

Acajack Oct 22, 2020 8:50 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by someone123 (Post 9082096)
Pretty similar to my situation. I consider myself one of the luckiest possible people around as far as covid goes. But it's still caused a bunch of problems, the most serious being difficulties with visiting family members. I think the elderly family members have been hit the hardest with loneliness. I don't know of anybody in my social circle who has gotten covid but I know a few people who lost their jobs.

I've also noticed I have a lot of friends I used to occasionally see when out doing things I no longer do, and it's hard to organize life now in a way that preserves those relationships. That was not a big deal for the first month or two but I wonder what will be left of these social ties across our society 6 months from now.

When all of this first started and we were locked down everyone was gung ho with virtual meetups. We had a large Zoom call at Easter with tons of aunts and uncles and cousins on it. We also had virtual "5 à 7" (after dinner dinner drinks) meetups with several of our friends and groups of friends. Then things opened up a bit and were allowed to go to restaurants with small groups. We went out with another couple a few times with a few couples. Had a few people over for lunch or dinner, and went over to a few people's places too. We had some online social activities at work as well.

But now everything seems to be slowly fizzling out both in-person (which has been tightened up again) and virtual. We only very sporadically share news with friends we'd normally see every couple of weeks.

I am not saying we will end up completely friendless, but I can see a significant number of my friendships not surviving this. I mean, you always lose touch with friends during the course of your life (temporarily or permanently) but this is going to accentuate that phenom exponentially istm.

I also have a "club" I am part of, if I can call it that, with very enthusiastic motivated members (or we were). Initially we congregated virtually a couple of times a week (more than usual), and then we resumed in person once a week when we were allowed to this summer. We had lost some members though already then. Now we're back in lockdown and we've been trying to start things up virtually again and no one really seems into it.

Steely Dan Oct 22, 2020 9:01 PM

I haven't done a big friends or family zoom thing in months. That shit got old.

Humans require actual social interaction. At least I do anyway.

The virtual zoom stuff tided over a lot of folks for a time, but the novelty eventually wore off and then the realization of its half-assed-ness set in and only made it that much more depressing.

Stay Stoked Brah Oct 22, 2020 9:08 PM

my brother flew to Mexico today. he said he bought the tickets back in April. he's the second person in my family to fly. an in-law of mine had to see his ailing dad in the hospital, not related to covid

Acajack Oct 22, 2020 9:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steely Dan (Post 9082417)
I haven't done a big friends or family zoom thing in months. That shit got old.

Humans require actual social interaction. At least I do anyway.

The virtual zoom stuff tided over a lot of folks for a time, but the novelty eventually wore off and then the realization of its half-assed-ness set in and only made it that much more depressing.

I see we are not the only ones.

The "deconfinement" we went through in the summer, followed by a "reconfinement" this fall as the 2nd wave hit, has had a devastating impact. No one seems to want to bother themselves much any more.

We're down to work colleagues (virtually) and the immediate family circle in terms of our regular social interactions. The occasional message or text to friends but even that seems to be drying up.

mhays Oct 22, 2020 9:48 PM

We failed to get it down low enough in the summer, which is a big factor in the current spike, which now requires some things to close again. There's a good chance of no federal aid until January. This is going to be bad.

And then we'll get a period where a vaccine exists but is still ramping up, but people get "light at the end of the tunnel" syndrome and stop being vigilant.

LA21st Oct 22, 2020 9:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Acajack (Post 9082447)
I see we are not the only ones.

The "deconfinement" we went through in the summer, followed by a "reconfinement" this fall as the 2nd wave hit, has had a devastating impact. No one seems to want to bother themselves much any more.

We're down to work colleagues (virtually) and the immediate family circle in terms of our regular social interactions. The occasional message or text to friends but even that seems to be drying up.

I still text alot. :shrug::haha:

the urban politician Oct 22, 2020 9:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steely Dan (Post 9082417)
I haven't done a big friends or family zoom thing in months. That shit got old.

Humans require actual social interaction. At least I do anyway.

The virtual zoom stuff tided over a lot of folks for a time, but the novelty eventually wore off and then the realization of its half-assed-ness set in and only made it that much more depressing.

Yep

homebucket Oct 22, 2020 10:11 PM

Do people not hang out outdoors anymore? You can still see your friends at the park, or in your backyard, at the golf course or tennis club. You can still have plenty of social interaction 6 feet apart, and if you're outdoors you can probably get even closer if you wanted to. I see people playing soccer and basketball all the time now.

LA21st Oct 22, 2020 10:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by homebucket (Post 9082519)
Do people not hang out outdoors anymore? You can still see your friends at the park, or in your backyard, at the golf course or tennis club. You can still have plenty of social interaction 6 feet apart, and if you're outdoors you can probably get even closer if you wanted to. I see people playing soccer and basketball all the time now.

I have some friends who won't even hike. I tell them it's safe, but their girlfriends don't trust it.

I've done some backyard stuff 5-7 people. its doable, but it feels risky.

mrnyc Oct 22, 2020 10:28 PM

i mean who needs smell anyway its a useless sense:


https://www.cnn.com/videos/health/20...s/coronavirus/

suburbanite Oct 22, 2020 10:29 PM

I imagine you would have had to be a pretty big hypochondriac to begin with if you're a young person afraid to hike outside because of Covid. If you were a regular active person before and now you're actually harming yourself by avoiding perfectly safe exercise, than I think the media has done you a great disservice by highlighting every freak case of a young person dying. I wear a mask literally everywhere and social distance, and will continue to do so indefinitely to slow down spread and protect others, but I'm not going to lock myself away and physiologically damage myself like it's the zombie apocalypse.

the urban politician Oct 22, 2020 10:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by homebucket (Post 9082519)
Do people not hang out outdoors anymore? You can still see your friends at the park, or in your backyard, at the golf course or tennis club. You can still have plenty of social interaction 6 feet apart, and if you're outdoors you can probably get even closer if you wanted to. I see people playing soccer and basketball all the time now.

January

Upper Midwest

There is no such thing as “outdoors” unless you are either sledding, skiing, walking from your car to the store, or ice fishing

Acajack Oct 22, 2020 10:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by homebucket (Post 9082519)
Do people not hang out outdoors anymore? You can still see your friends at the park, or in your backyard, at the golf course or tennis club. You can still have plenty of social interaction 6 feet apart, and if you're outdoors you can probably get even closer if you wanted to. I see people playing soccer and basketball all the time now.

Sports are one thing but typically my activities with my friends don't involve just standing around in a park with six feet separating all of the participants.

I guess it's better than nothing, and I've done it (in backyards) over the summer, but there is something that feels psychologically stifling about no longer having the natural, spontaneous human interactions we've lived with our entire lives.

Plus much of U.S. and all of Canada is now entering the part of the year where backyard and park socializing becomes way less common.

mrnyc Oct 22, 2020 10:50 PM

i wonder how the 'rona is going to take to all these restaurant streeteries now that the heat lamps are coming out and they are getting all enclosed? :shrug:



https://i.pinimg.com/originals/e7/5f...1ed42d703a.jpg

homebucket Oct 22, 2020 11:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Acajack (Post 9082545)
Sports are one thing but typically my activities with my friends don't involve just standing around in a park with six feet separating all of the participants.

I guess it's better than nothing, and I've done it (in backyards) over the summer, but there is something that feels psychologically stifling about no longer having the natural, spontaneous human interactions we've lived with our entire lives.

Plus much of U.S. and all of Canada is now entering the part of the year where backyard and park socializing becomes way less common.

I imagine outdoor fire pits should sell well this year then.

https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-CXy5Cs1FG...26_preview.png

Acajack Oct 22, 2020 11:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by homebucket (Post 9082581)
I imagine outdoor fire pits should sell well this year then.

https://4.bp.blogspot.com/-CXy5Cs1FG...26_preview.png

Yeah, we'll have to give that a try!

JManc Oct 22, 2020 11:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Acajack (Post 9082447)
I see we are not the only ones.

The "deconfinement" we went through in the summer, followed by a "reconfinement" this fall as the 2nd wave hit, has had a devastating impact. No one seems to want to bother themselves much any more.

We're down to work colleagues (virtually) and the immediate family circle in terms of our regular social interactions. The occasional message or text to friends but even that seems to be drying up.

And how can anyone beyond social recluses think this is healthy?

My mom was a therapist until retirement last year but recently went back to work because the fuck ton of job offers and the impact Covid has had on mental health.

Steely Dan Oct 22, 2020 11:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by homebucket (Post 9082519)
Do people not hang out outdoors anymore?

oh yeah, we still do some outdoor socializing, i was specifically talking about how lame all of the zoom shit eventually came to be for me.

but now that november is knocking on the door in chicago, outdoor socializing is going to get few and far between as people hole up for the winter.

we're supposed to go to a friend's small backyard gathering for a b-day party this saturday night, but temps are forecast to be in the low 40s.

my guess is that the gathering will be fairly short-lived. most people in chicago (everywhere) are absolute wimps when it comes to chilly weather.

Pedestrian Oct 22, 2020 11:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Steely Dan (Post 9082615)
oh yeah, we still do some outdoor socializing, i was specifically talking about how lame all of the zoom shit eventually came to be for me.

but now that november is knocking on the door in chicago, outdoor socializing is going to get few and far between as people hole up for the winter.

we're supposed to go to a friend's small backyard gathering for a b-day party this saturday night, but temps are forecast to be in the low 40s.

my guess is that the gathering will be fairly short-lived. most people in chicago (everywhere) are absolute wimps when it comes to chilly weather.

This is why I'll be interested in how the disease goes in Arizona. It would seem like the pattern in most of the country should be reversed since the weather in summer is hotter than H*ll and everybody hides indoors in their A/C but just about now it's getting really nice and will pretty much stay that way through next spring--great for outdoor dining and other activities. Time to get out and wave at the neighbors.

niwell Oct 23, 2020 1:31 PM

I'm still going to patios with a select group of friends in our bubble (7 of us total, no family at all in the city) - it can get quite cold but most have heat lamps now and bundling up helps. Wonder how long we can keep it up... We're comfortable hanging out inside but it's nice to be able to go to a bar instead of someone's living room.

Tried to get a heat lamp but they are sold out pretty much everywhere. Our backyard is more or less entirely a wooden deck so not sure how well one of the propane fire pits would work.


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