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-   -   How Is Covid-19 Impacting Life in Your City? (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showthread.php?t=242036)

10023 Apr 9, 2020 6:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by iheartthed (Post 8889103)
So you don't actually have to stand in line everyday for an hour. You're just a masochist.

The lines are longer at grocery stores. There are just more stops to make this way. But that’s how I prefer to shop, the old fashioned way.

homebucket Apr 9, 2020 6:32 PM

I imagine this is happening in all the other cities as well.

Google Streetview:
https://goo.gl/maps/3upr9utrhGHziBaPA

Quote:

'Business has been incredible': Inside one of the few SF businesses thriving during the pandemic
Noe Valley's Baron's Meat & Poultry has seen foot traffic triple

By Amy Graff, SFGATE Updated 3:03 pm PDT, Wednesday, April 8, 2020

As people's daily meal routines have been impacted by restaurant closures and long grocery store lines in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, one place they're turning is small local food shops. Baron's, located in a space that has housed a meat shop for more than 100 years, sits in a mostly residential area of the city and is within walking distance of hundreds of homes.

"Business has been incredible," says store manager Matt Ebling, who has worked 10 years as a butcher and another 10 as a restaurant chef. "It has been so busy since this all started. We’re all just grinding. With all the restaurants closed, people are eating at home. We have a good supply of everything, meat, liquor and a grocery section."

It's Wednesday at 1 p.m. when Ebling says he's embarrassed a rush of 60 people in the last two hours has drained the shop's inventory. But, honestly, Baron's offerings look plentiful compared to plenty of shelves at larger grocery stores in the area. The meat case is a carnivore lover's dream come true with brisket, flank steak, Denver steak, baseball steak, chuck roast, lamb racks, cured bacon, smoked beer sausages — all of it mostly from California farmers. Slabs of fish — wild caught rock cod, steelhead trout, filet of sole — glisten on the far end of the case.

...

"We are a very neighborhood butcher shop. I know the majority of customers by first name, and it’s nice to get community support," he says. "We're seeing lots of new faces too."
https://www.sfgate.com/bayarea/artic...s-15182837.php

hauntedheadnc Apr 9, 2020 6:37 PM

A neighbor stopped by randomly today with packets of seeds that he was offering for free to anyone who wanted to start a garden. We ended up with kale, cucumbers, and squash.

homebucket Apr 9, 2020 6:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hauntedheadnc (Post 8889133)
A neighbor stopped by randomly today with packets of seeds that he was offering for free to anyone who wanted to start a garden. We ended up with kale, cucumbers, and squash.

People are definitely upping their home gardening game around here too.

mhays Apr 9, 2020 6:40 PM

Buying groceries every day adds too much risk for other people, plus yourself.

iheartthed Apr 9, 2020 6:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mhays (Post 8889138)
Buying groceries every day adds too much risk for other people, plus yourself.

Yes, exactly. He could be an asymptomatic spreader and might be prolonging the social distancing period for everybody because he likes to shop everyday.

10023 Apr 9, 2020 7:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mhays (Post 8889138)
Buying groceries every day adds too much risk for other people, plus yourself.

I would be harming my health by living on packaged food, not buying fresh vegetables. And everyone is “distancing” in these shops.

And if you need something to make a recipe, you need it.

Pedestrian Apr 9, 2020 7:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by awholeparade (Post 8888783)
I'm not considering selling my condo, but I do think that I would be handling this period much better if I had a yard and a driveway. I'm a big mountain biker and I could be screwing around in those areas on my bike, if I had them. Instead, I have to pass through common areas and multiple doors just to get outside. I bought my place specifically to be right by a great urban park, but because I'm in a dense area (for Denver), my street has the same amount of activity as ever (going to/from the park), and I don't feel comfortable going to the park because it's so packed. Again, I'm not considering selling and moving, but these are thoughts that I've had.

Well, I've made this clear before, I think, but I have exactly the same thoughts. Fortunately for me, I have both options: The condo in SF in a large multifamily building and the single family home with enclosed patios in Arizona. And while this is the time of year I'd normally be returning to SF, the dreary rainy season being over. this year I'm delaying it. I've changed my plans twice so far, pushing back the trip by first a week, then a month. I'm not the biking sort or any of that, but the thought of using elevators with other people, shared laundry rooms, getting my packages from the building concierge downstairs (via another elevator trip) rather than just outside the front door, and all the rest is daunting.

mrnyc Apr 9, 2020 7:10 PM

:cheers:
Quote:

Originally Posted by 10023 (Post 8889046)
So every other day then? I don’t have an American fridge. There simply isn’t any space if one is making 2-3 meals a day for two people at home. And that’s with cooking things like beans in bulk (which of course then need to be refrigerated).

I’m also adamant about supporting local business during this time, so I’ve tried to stop going to Whole Foods (the typical UK high street grocery stores suck), and instead go to the greengrocers, a bakery, a butcher, a fishmonger, etc.



you can always raid your mom's fridge upstairs from the basement. :rolleyes:

Pedestrian Apr 9, 2020 7:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10023 (Post 8889159)
I would be harming my health by living on packaged food, not buying fresh vegetables. And everyone is “distancing” in these shops.

And if you need something to make a recipe, you need it.

Oh, please. Have you heard of those various containers that actually do keep vegetables fresh for at least several days if not the 9 days they claim?

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon...._AC_SX522_.jpg

iheartthed Apr 9, 2020 7:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pedestrian (Post 8889172)
Oh, please. Have you heard of those various containers that actually do keep vegetables fresh for at least several days if not the 9 days they claim?

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon...._AC_SX522_.jpg

You mean to tell me that in the year 2020 someone has actually thought about how to keep produce fresh for longer than 24 hours? Mind blown.

10023 Apr 9, 2020 7:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pedestrian (Post 8889172)
Oh, please. Have you heard of those various containers that actually do keep vegetables fresh for at least several days if not the 9 days they claim?

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon...._AC_SX522_.jpg

No, never in my life have I seen that, and they probably aren’t available here. But regardless, the space issue remains. Bunches of kale take up a lot of room.

I actually really hate the American habit of huge grocery shopping trips once a week or less, to buy mostly packaged food. Even if we had a pantry, it wouldn’t be stocked with cans and in any event things like rice and beans and pasta require fresh ingredients to go along with them.

I don’t think shopping for food at least every other day is out of step with the norm where I live. No one has the fridge/pantry space, and you only buy what you can carry home on foot.

You guys are acting as if the very air outside will kill you. Meanwhile most people are trying to go about their lives as best they can. If it was just me, there wouldn’t be lines.

iheartthed Apr 9, 2020 7:40 PM

Windsor, Ontario is worried about an outbreak from Windsor residents who commute daily to work in Detroit hospitals. Michigan currently has more confirmed infections than all of Canada put together (21.5k vs 20.6k), and the city of Detroit has more than all of Ontario (6k vs 5.2k):

https://windsorstar.com/news/local-n...l-in-pandemic/

Pedestrian Apr 9, 2020 7:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10023 (Post 8889185)
No, never in my life have I seen that, and they probably aren’t available here. But regardless, the space issue remains. Bunches of kale take up a lot of room.

Quote:

The “green bags” are designed for fruits and vegetables that ripen by the production of the plant hormone, ethylene. Ethylene gas is produced in copious quantities by certain fruits, most notably bananas. As the concentration of ethylene gas increases in an enclosed environment, the fruit ripens faster. Removal of ethylene helps keep fruits from over-ripening quickly. The green bags are made of a polymer that allows the escape of the gas while keeping others, and some of them actually use additives to the film to absorb other gases that promote ripening or deterioration.

The green bags do work for certain types of produce. Some caveats–the shelf life is extended as long as the product is very dry (mold growth appears to be a problem in damp produce). Also, the bags have a shelf life and can only be reused 10 times.
https://blogs.extension.iastate.edu/...produce-fresh/

I find that these things can at least double the freshness time of a lot of produce. Living alone, I find it hard to use up fresh produce before it goes bad but these bags (and there are also plastic containers etc) give me more time to finish off what I buy.

10023 Apr 9, 2020 7:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hauntedheadnc (Post 8889133)
A neighbor stopped by randomly today with packets of seeds that he was offering for free to anyone who wanted to start a garden. We ended up with kale, cucumbers, and squash.

It would be great to have outdoor space during this.

10023 Apr 9, 2020 7:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pedestrian (Post 8889213)

So they’re mostly for fruits, especially bananas (which I don’t eat).

I doubt they would keep the asparagus (it’s Spargelzeit!), wild garlic, zucchini, radicchio and other things currently in my fridge fresh for long enough to make a difference to my shopping needs.

JManc Apr 9, 2020 7:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10023 (Post 8889185)

I don’t think shopping for food at least every other day is out of step with the norm where I live.

Sure, when there's not a pandemic otherwise I think the vast majority of your fellow Londoners are altering their lifestyles somewhat for a while even at the point of inconvenience.

Crawford Apr 9, 2020 7:57 PM

I don't think too many Europeans shop North American style. Really none of my in-laws do the Costco-type shopping. Small fridges, kitchens and cars, emphasis on fresh food from narrowly focused specialty retailers, to be consumed on the day purchased.

And not in a precious/twee/upper class manner; factory workers generally have the same lifestyle. No Brooklyn-SF style $15 artisanal mayonaise made by Princeton dropouts, just good, simple, fairly priced food. Daily visits to baker, butcher and fruit and veggie place.

MonkeyRonin Apr 9, 2020 7:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10023 (Post 8889046)
I’m also adamant about supporting local business during this time, so I’ve tried to stop going to Whole Foods (the typical UK high street grocery stores suck), and instead go to the greengrocers, a bakery, a butcher, a fishmonger, etc.


The local shops have hour long waits?? I've specifically been shopping almost exclusively at small green grocers, etc now because they don't have huge lines. It's the big supermarkets that should be avoided (though still need to do it once every couple weeks to stock up on pantry goods and household items).

On the other hand, I had to wait in a 20 minute line at the liquor store today. Business must be way up though. I counted about 25 people in the lineup outside, plus maybe another 15 once inside. I've definitely never seen 40 people at my little neighbourhood liquor store all at once - let alone at 2PM on a Thursday!

Good thing I've been laid off and have all the time to wait in these lines now though. :haha:

Handro Apr 9, 2020 8:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10023 (Post 8889185)
No, never in my life have I seen that, and they probably aren’t available here. But regardless, the space issue remains. Bunches of kale take up a lot of room.

I actually really hate the American habit of huge grocery shopping trips once a week or less, to buy mostly packaged food. Even if we had a pantry, it wouldn’t be stocked with cans and in any event things like rice and beans and pasta require fresh ingredients to go along with them.

I don’t think shopping for food at least every other day is out of step with the norm where I live. No one has the fridge/pantry space, and you only buy what you can carry home on foot.

You guys are acting as if the very air outside will kill you. Meanwhile most people are trying to go about their lives as best they can. If it was just me, there wouldn’t be lines.

You and your partner need to get better at cooking and shopping. My girlfriend and I only buy fresh foods and meats, the only "packaged" food we get is canned whipped cream for me (addiction) and tortilla chips for her (she makes her own salsa). We live in a tiny condo and have small fridge to accommodate the limited space. We've been going once a week, maybe stopping in quickly a second time if there is something one of us really needs. Plan your meals, freeze your meats. Eat leftovers. Don't buy things like strawberries that go bad in a day or two, be smart with the produce you buy. Spinach, kale, asparagus, broccoli, bananas, raspberries, pineapple... all these things easily last when properly stored.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Crawford (Post 8889230)
I don't think too many Europeans shop North American style. Really none of my in-laws do the Costco-type shopping. Small fridges, kitchens and cars, emphasis on fresh food from narrowly focused specialty retailers, to be consumed on the day purchased.

And not in a precious/twee/upper class manner; factory workers generally have the same lifestyle. No Brooklyn-SF style $15 artisanal mayonaise made by Princeton dropouts, just good, simple, fairly priced food. Daily visits to baker, butcher and fruit and veggie place.

During normal times, sure. But there is currently a pandemic that makes grocery shopping a time consuming nightmare, so people adjust accordingly. My sister in Brescia, Italy just made her first trip to the store in two weeks and has a family of four to feed.

10023 Apr 9, 2020 8:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MonkeyRonin (Post 8889234)
The local shops have hour long waits?? I've specifically been shopping almost exclusively at small green grocers, etc now because they don't have huge lines. It's the big supermarkets that should be avoided (though still need to do it once every couple weeks to stock up on pantry goods and household items).

On the other hand, I had to wait in a 20 minute line at the liquor store today. Business must be way up though. I counted about 25 people in the lineup outside, plus maybe another 15 once inside. I've definitely never seen 40 people at my little neighbourhood liquor store all at once - let alone at 2PM on a Thursday!

Good thing I've been laid off and have all the time to wait in these lines now though. :haha:

Not individually. But when you’re going to the local shops and not the Whole Foods with a super long wait, you need to go to 3-4 places.

My local wine/beer shop has actually had to stop delivering because the drivers are too expensive, so there are queues at those too.

10023 Apr 9, 2020 8:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Handro (Post 8889237)
You and your partner need to get better at cooking and shopping. My girlfriend and I only buy fresh foods and meats, the only "packaged" food we get is canned whipped cream for me (addiction) and tortilla chips for her (she makes her own salsa). We live in a tiny condo and have small fridge to accommodate the limited space. We've been going once a week, maybe stopping in quickly a second time if there is something one of us really needs. Plan your meals, freeze your meats. Eat leftovers. Don't buy things like strawberries that go bad in a day or two, be smart with the produce you buy. Spinach, kale, asparagus, broccoli, bananas, raspberries, pineapple... all these things easily last when properly stored.

Ahh, a freezer? What’s that like? Mine has a couple of ice trays, a cold pack for my injured ankle, and a couple of frozen confit duck legs (I made 8 of them at once in the sous vide, but you can only eat so much duck in a week). That’s all it has room for. And frozen and thawed meat isn’t the same anyway. I live to eat, I don’t eat to live.

Again, space is the main issue. You simply can’t fit a week’s worth of kale in my fridge. And asparagus is only at its peak for a couple of days at most. At least we don’t have to refrigerate our eggs here.

Meanwhile I do have steaks for tonight, bought on Monday with a date of April 11 on them, but they’ve started to turn grey. I’m not going to do that again.

niwell Apr 9, 2020 8:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MonkeyRonin (Post 8889234)
The local shops have hour long waits?? I've specifically been shopping almost exclusively at small green grocers, etc now because they don't have huge lines. It's the big supermarkets that should be avoided.

On the other hand, had to wait in a 20 minute line at the liquor store today! Business must be way up though. I counted about 25 people in the lineup outside, plus maybe another 15 once inside. I've definitely never seen 40 people at my little neighbourhood liquor store all at once - let alone at 2PM on a Thursday.

Good thing I've been laid off and have all the time to wait in these lines now though. :haha:


Sorry to hear about your layoff - hopefully it's temporary while this is going on! At least they are fastracking EI / CERB right now.

Sounds like your strategy is pretty much the same as mine, and given as we live in similar areas may have crossed paths (at a distance!) at some point. I also waited in line 20 minutes at the Dufferin Mall LCBO today, which is pretty much unheard of outside of New Years eve! Once I was inside it was great though - they also aren't kidding around as plexiglass shields have been installed and they gave everyone a squirt of hand sanitizer upon entering. I mentioned this in another thread but according to friends who work at Collective Arts and Great Lakes Brewing, sales are actually pretty steady compared to pre-lockdown - deliveries have actually made up for the loss of licensee sales!

I was thinking about stopping by the Lansdowne No Frills to get some things that are harder to find, but nixed that immediately on account of the line snaking through the edges of the parking lot. I have heard from friends in Parkdale that Longo's has had zero lineups so may check that out later this weekend.

Aside from the produce we've been ordering, I've found the convenience store beside Burdock is actually quite well stocked. And I can visit Burdock after for beer and sourdough bread (both necessities right now).

sopas ej Apr 9, 2020 8:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10023 (Post 8889222)
So they’re mostly for fruits, especially bananas (which I don’t eat).

I doubt they would keep the asparagus (it’s Spargelzeit!), wild garlic, zucchini, radicchio and other things currently in my fridge fresh for long enough to make a difference to my shopping needs.

I don't use those bags either; I've never heard of them. We use something called the "crisper drawer" in the fridge. :P

I don't know about that other stuff you get, but zucchini can last about a week, and garlic can last close to two weeks, definitely at least 1.5 weeks. Are you not storing them unpeeled? A whole head of garlic can last about 2 weeks, I think, so long as you keep it whole/unpeeled. Even individual unpeeled cloves of garlic can last for a bit, even on the counter. We don't peel them until we're ready to use them. And we use garlic all the time so it rarely sits on the counter for more than a week anyway.

Pre-pandemic, we would go grocery shopping once a week or every 3-4 days. We don't buy a lot either, we get enough produce or meat that'll last us about a week. Since the pandemic, we've been trying to go once every other week, to avoid going out.

Most local farmers markets are only once a week, and I know people who only shop at local farmers markets... of course individual neighborhood/local farmers markets are held on different days of the week...

Acajack Apr 9, 2020 8:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10023 (Post 8889185)

You guys are acting as if the very air outside will kill you. Meanwhile most people are trying to go about their lives as best they can. If it was just me, there wouldn’t be lines.

This made me laugh, if I am reading it right. Sounds like "Grrr, if only every one took transit (except me), there wouldn't be so much traffic on the goddamn roads!"

Now I shouldn't criticize too much, as my wife is absolutely obsessed with eating fresh and it's hard right now to keep her from going to the store every single day. The best I can do is every two days. And even then I am not always successful.

I keep telling her that eventually we may get to be like Italy or France where I believe you have vouchers of sorts to leave the house. You write down the purpose of your outing and you're only really authorized to go the grocery store once a week.

Acajack Apr 9, 2020 8:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10023 (Post 8889102)

I don’t know what milk you’re buying that lasts two weeks! Or even cheese.

.

I have milk in my fridge bought earlier this week that has a best before date of April 27.

Cheese can last pretty long in the fridge as well.

MonkeyRonin Apr 9, 2020 8:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by niwell (Post 8889260)
Sorry to hear about your layoff - hopefully it's temporary while this is going on! At least they are fastracking EI / CERB right now.

Sounds like your strategy is pretty much the same as mine, and given as we live in similar areas may have crossed paths (at a distance!) at some point. I also waited in line 20 minutes at the Dufferin Mall LCBO today, which is pretty much unheard of outside of New Years eve! Once I was inside it was great though - they also aren't kidding around as plexiglass shields have been installed and they gave everyone a squirt of hand sanitizer upon entering. I mentioned this in another thread but according to friends who work at Collective Arts and Great Lakes Brewing, sales are actually pretty steady compared to pre-lockdown - deliveries have actually made up for the loss of licensee sales!

I was thinking about stopping by the Lansdowne No Frills to get some things that are harder to find, but nixed that immediately on account of the line snaking through the edges of the parking lot. I have heard from friends in Parkdale that Longo's has had zero lineups so may check that out later this weekend.

Aside from the produce we've been ordering, I've found the convenience store beside Burdock is actually quite well stocked. And I can visit Burdock after for beer and sourdough bread (both necessities right now).


Thanks, all good though - I was actually in desperate need of a vacation. Getting $2000 per month to sit at home and play video games for a little while doesn't sound so bad right now. :haha:

Any NoFrills' are basically a no-go right now, but some of the slightly-smaller supermarkets like the FreshCo on Gladstone or Metro on College aren't too bad. I hadn't even thought about buying bottles from the local breweries - I'll have to skip the LCBO and do that next time I need to re-stock on beer (should have enough liquor to last me the next couples months now at least...).

10023 Apr 9, 2020 8:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sopas ej (Post 8889271)
I don't use those bags either; I've never heard of them. We use something called the "crisper drawer" in the fridge. :P

I don't know about that other stuff you get, but zucchini can last about a week, and garlic can last close to two weeks, definitely at least 1.5 weeks. Are you not storing them unpeeled? A whole head of garlic can last about 2 weeks, I think, so long as you keep it whole/unpeeled. Even individual unpeeled cloves of garlic can last for a bit, even on the counter. We don't peel them until we're ready to use them. And we use garlic all the time so it rarely sits on the counter for more than a week anyway.

Pre-pandemic, we would go grocery shopping once a week or every 3-4 days. We don't buy a lot either, we get enough produce or meat that'll last us about a week. Since the pandemic, we've been trying to go once every other week, to avoid going out.

Most local farmers markets are only once a week, and I know people who only shop at local farmers markets... of course individual neighborhood/local farmers markets are held on different days of the week...

Wild garlic is a leaf, similar to the ramps that you get in the US. It goes bad if you look at it funny.

When you say “avoid going out”, I assume you’re still going for walks or running. Literally staying indoors all day is extremely unhealthy. I would personally become deeply depressed very quickly.

hauntedheadnc Apr 9, 2020 8:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10023 (Post 8889217)
It would be great to have outdoor space during this.

I'm 'bout to container garden alllll up in this bitch. We have a wee little patio out back that gets a lot of shade, but enough sun for government work, plus a sunblasted little patch of lawn and a porch on the front that cooks in the afternoon sun. But... some plants seem to enjoy getting to pretend they're rooted in the middle of a barren parking lot.

"Parking lot sun" is the phrase I heard for situations like our front porch, at a garden store. I rather liked it and have used it ever since.

C. Apr 9, 2020 8:53 PM

Has there been any suspending of high profile construction projects in your city? I'm amazed that construction work still seems to be going on in some places even with restrictive stay-at-home orders.

I imagine there are buildings that can't be exposed to the elements too long once construction has begun.

sopas ej Apr 9, 2020 8:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10023 (Post 8889294)
Wild garlic is a leaf, similar to the ramps that you get in the US. It goes bad if you look at it funny.

Ah, I thought you meant just regular garlic. My bad! I've never used wild garlic.

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10023 (Post 8889294)
When you say “avoid going out”, I assume you’re still going for walks or running. Literally staying indoors all day is extremely unhealthy. I would personally become deeply depressed very quickly.

Oh yes, we still go for walks, definitely. My partner now starting his 4th week of working from home, he really looks forward to our walks (I still commute to work). It's been rainy here too the past week or so, we've even walked a bit in the rain. We just want to avoid the stores as much as we can. We've already gotten a number of things online, like TP, paper towels, tahini, garbanzo beans (we like to make our own hummus). You mentioned baguettes in one of your posts; yesterday, I got 2 baguettes on my way home from work; we ate one and are saving the other for today. We don't buy white bread, we usually buy rye at the supermarket.

We've adapted to this stay at home thing, but it took some time, I'll admit. The first week was a killer. We're so used to going out all the time, we were hardly ever home for long periods at a time. We're so used to going to museums, out to the movies, hiking, walks along the beach, that sort of thing... quick runs to the market, or a spur-of-the-moment dessert at one of our local bakeries. This pandemic has really made us realize how often we go out. And now since we only walk around our neighborhood/town, I feel like we've become like a little village. We see the same people on our walks.

We haven't changed our eating habits too much, we just plan our meals differently than we have before. We're trying not to do take out food too much, either, though I like supporting our local restaurants, and I admit sometimes I'm too lazy to cook/prepare food. I thought I might gain weight during this stay at home thing, but actually, I've been able to maintain my weight. I just told myself that I don't want to go into "famine" or "survival" mode---there's no need to start overeating to store fat, we're not experiencing a food shortage. It's funny how humans react, because in the first few days of stay-at-home, I did feel like I wanted to eat more, but I consciously made the effort not to.

10023 Apr 9, 2020 9:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sopas ej (Post 8889335)
Ah, I thought you meant just regular garlic. My bad! I've never used wild garlic.



Oh yes, we still go for walks, definitely. My partner now starting his 4th week of working from home, he really looks forward to our walks (I still commute to work). It's been rainy here too the past week or so, we've even walked a bit in the rain. We just want to avoid the stores as much as we can. We've already gotten a number of things online, like TP, paper towels, tahini, garbanzo beans (we like to make our own hummus). You mentioned baguettes in one of your posts; yesterday, I got 2 baguettes on my way home from work; we ate one and are saving the other for today. We don't buy white bread, we usually buy rye at the supermarket.

We've adapted to this stay at home thing, but it took some time, I'll admit. The first week was a killer. We're so used to going out all the time, we were hardly ever home for long periods at a time. We're so used to going to museums, out to the movies, hiking, walks along the beach, that sort of thing... quick runs to the market, or a spur-of-the-moment dessert at one of our local bakeries. This pandemic has really made us realize how often we go out. And now since we only walk around our neighborhood/town, I feel like we've become like a little village. We see the same people on our walks.

We haven't changed our eating habits too much, we just plan our meals differently than we have before. We're trying not to do take out food too much, either, though I like supporting our local restaurants, and I admit sometimes I'm too lazy to cook/prepare food. I thought I might gain weight during this stay at home thing, but actually, I've been able to maintain my weight. I just told myself that I don't want to go into "famine" or "survival" mode---there's no need to start overeating to store fat, we're not experiencing a food shortage. It's funny how humans react, because in the first few days of stay-at-home, I did feel like I wanted to eat more, but I consciously made the effort not to.

I am eating copious amounts of beans (soaked and cooked from dry, with aromatics and herbs). With social distancing, you can fart as much as you like. :haha:

I’ve actually been losing weight in the absence of gym time.

tdawg Apr 9, 2020 9:11 PM

I'm losing weight, too, but I fear it's muscle mass. I'm running, doing "prison workouts" with bands and bodyweight exercises in the park, and YouTube Yoga. I miss Equinox, but then again, people are dying so ...

sopas ej Apr 9, 2020 9:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10023 (Post 8889353)
I am eating copious amounts of beans (soaked and cooked from dry, with aromatics and herbs). With social distancing, you can fart as much as you like. :haha:


:haha: Well good for you!

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10023 (Post 8889353)
I’ve actually been losing weight in the absence of gym time.

Is that something you're okay with, or did you want to maintain your weight?

Going back to food, I was thinking of making this; I thought it was interesting... If you watch the video, she didn't even need water to make the dough; the video is only under 9 minutes long:

Avocado Paratha
http://www.manjulaskitchen.com/blog/...ha-300x169.jpg
Link: http://www.manjulaskitchen.com/avoca...8qmhAzQC0VSEB4

Pedestrian Apr 9, 2020 9:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10023 (Post 8889222)
So they’re mostly for fruits, especially bananas (which I don’t eat).

I doubt they would keep the asparagus (it’s Spargelzeit!), wild garlic, zucchini, radicchio and other things currently in my fridge fresh for long enough to make a difference to my shopping needs.

They actually do work pretty well for asparagus, zucchini and leafy things like radicchio. Also celery, green onions and bell peppers. Garlic lasts perfectly well in a garlic keeper on the counter top.

10023 Apr 9, 2020 9:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hauntedheadnc (Post 8889332)
I'm 'bout to container garden alllll up in this bitch. We have a wee little patio out back that gets a lot of shade, but enough sun for government work, plus a sunblasted little patch of lawn and a porch on the front that cooks in the afternoon sun. But... some plants seem to enjoy getting to pretend they're rooted in the middle of a barren parking lot.

"Parking lot sun" is the phrase I heard for situations like our front porch, at a garden store. I rather liked it and have used it ever since.

I’m jealous.

We have been living in a rented flat here for years, much longer than I intended, because of course we didn’t know if we’d stay, and then there was the Brexit vote, etc. I was in the market before coronavirus and now I’m glad I didn’t buy a place, because housing prices are going to take a hit. But some kind of outdoor space, whether it’s a garden or a terrace, is a must, if for no other reason than to grow herbs and cook with fire.

10023 Apr 9, 2020 9:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pedestrian (Post 8889372)
They actually do work pretty well for asparagus, zucchini and leafy things like radicchio. Also celery, green onions and bell peppers. Garlic lasts perfectly well in a garlic keeper on the counter top.

Ha... garlic doesn’t need to last because we go through 3-4 whole heads a week.

Eggs are the issue. They’re sold in packs of 6 and you are limited to 2 by anti-hoarding measures. A dozen eggs only lasts two people a few days at most.

mrnyc Apr 9, 2020 10:07 PM

another shocking high of 824 deaths in a day in nyc.

but hospital admissions are going down.

seems to be the peak.

mhays Apr 9, 2020 10:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10023 (Post 8889159)
I would be harming my health by living on packaged food, not buying fresh vegetables. And everyone is “distancing” in these shops.

And if you need something to make a recipe, you need it.

Distancing is a very partial measure, particularly where people touch things. And the workers who are around hundreds of different people per day are at risk.

You're adding societal and personal risk for pure quality of life. It's possible to eat very well with groceries every 2-3 days even without a lot of refrigerator space.

montréaliste Apr 9, 2020 10:16 PM

Knucklehead semi driver does a u-turn on a Montreal bridge in slow traffic...

https://montreal.ctvnews.ca/camera-c...idge-1.4890623

Pedestrian Apr 9, 2020 10:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mrnyc (Post 8889418)
another shocking high of 824 deaths in a day in nyc.

but hospital admissions are going down.

seems to be the peak.

Perhaps if they'd been eating fresh raddichio every day they'd have made it. :rolleyes:

JManc Apr 9, 2020 10:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hauntedheadnc (Post 8889332)
I'm 'bout to container garden alllll up in this bitch. We have a wee little patio out back that gets a lot of shade, but enough sun for government work, plus a sunblasted little patch of lawn and a porch on the front that cooks in the afternoon sun. But... some plants seem to enjoy getting to pretend they're rooted in the middle of a barren parking lot.

"Parking lot sun" is the phrase I heard for situations like our front porch, at a garden store. I rather liked it and have used it ever since.

I have a fairly big yard and I have been thinking about putting in a raised garden. Now is as good time as any to start. My grandfather grew almost all his own vegetables and would be great to do that on my own. Canned his own tomatoes as well.

pj3000 Apr 9, 2020 10:52 PM

I'm thinking of starting a project tomorrow... one of those aluminum and polycarb greenhouses in my yard to grow herbs and tomatoes. They're about 6'x8' and I think you can get them for like $500-600 bucks.

If I like it, I might consider building an actual greenhouse that could be used all year round. Anyone ever use one of those ready-to-assemble ones like below? I have some concerns about durability... namely ability to withstand wind gusts.

https://mobileimages.lowes.com/produ...16.jpg?size=xl

craigs Apr 9, 2020 11:23 PM

If we intended to live here permanently, we would definitely plant some basic crops such as carrots, green beans, cucumbers, and tomatoes. Some parts of the 1.7-acre property have full sun all day long while other parts are shaded all day by huge trees, so we could plant all sorts of things. Alas, we'll probably be moving to another family property in Los Angeles before autumn.

sopas ej Apr 10, 2020 12:50 AM

Dinner at home this evening. Didn't do takeout. #StayAtHome #Coronavoidance

Quinoa with shiitake, bell peppers, tomatoes, and some spices. Washed down with some red wine. It was yummy!
https://scontent-lax3-1.xx.fbcdn.net...3e&oe=5EB5F98E
Photo by me

AviationGuy Apr 10, 2020 3:23 AM

There was mention above of losing weight. I've been losing weight, possibly muscle weight due to not going to the gym, although I've been doing some workouts here at home. it's not the same, though. I also haven't been eating as much Tex Mex, so that's probably part of it, too.

Yesterday I made a 25-mile trip through the city and on to Dripping Springs for a vet appointment. This was at midday and traffic was very heavy, especially in the burbs along 290. As I drove past the parking area for Barton Creek Greenbelt (adjacent to Mopac Expwy), I saw that the parking area was completely packed, and I saw groups of hikers obviously not thinking about distancing. I saw no masks on vehicle drivers or passengers, either. At the vet, everything was done very cautiously. You couldn't go inside, and had to leave your pet by the front door, and then talk to the vet by phone from your car.

I had a prescription delivered today, and I wish I had a video of the delivery. The delivery person had on a mask and gloves, and the prescription package was being carried by one of those grabber things on a 3-foot pole. They said don't open the door, but just acknowledge that it was received.

Bottom line...I'm seeing inconsistencies. Some people not taking things seriously, but others definitely taking it seriously.

rsbear Apr 10, 2020 3:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AviationGuy (Post 8889684)
Bottom line...I'm seeing inconsistencies. Some people not taking things seriously, but others definitely taking it seriously.

I'll bet the precautions taken by the vet and the delivery person were based upon business decisions. The park goers were demonstrating thier (poor) personal decision making abilities. The later will change thier ways as positive cases and deaths increase in the local Austin area. But, by then, it will be too late for so many people.

llamaorama Apr 10, 2020 4:28 AM

I have a potted lemon tree on my apartment patio, if that counts.

https://consequenceofsound.net/wp-co...ville-sour.gif

mhays Apr 10, 2020 5:04 AM

Why are food pictures on this board generally gross looking? I mean the photography, not the food. It's like TV commercials with food...too close.

I suggest all menu discussion get moved out of here.

muppet Apr 10, 2020 9:55 AM

Empty London

SE9, https://www.skyscrapercity.com/threa...2255200/page-3


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