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-   -   How Is Covid-19 Impacting Life in Your City? (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showthread.php?t=242036)

Pedestrian Apr 7, 2020 11:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by yuriandrade (Post 8887378)
I just came across with this on the Worldometer:

An estimated additional 180 - 195 deaths per day occurring at home in New York City due to COVID-19 are not being counted in the official figures. "Early on in this crisis we were able to swab people who died at home, and thus got a coronavirus reading. But those days are long gone. We simply don't have the testing capacity for the large numbers dying at home. Now only those few who had a test confirmation *before* dying are marked as victims of coronavirus on their death certificate. This almost certainly means we are undercounting the total number of victims of this pandemic," said Mark Levine, Chair of New York City Council health committee

That's terrible. Are there more info on it?

I don't know about New York, but in some states any death outside of a hospital is considered an "unattended death" and becomes a matter for the local coroner who is supposed to do enough of an autopsy to determine whether any "foul play" could have been involved. Under the circumstances, though, I don't see how any corner could keep up with what's happening in New York or anyplace like it so they are probably finessing much of an examination of the deceased.

However, coronavirus testing materials have certainly been in short supply but I doubt they are in such short supply that a few hundred can't be spared to be used on anybody dying with respiratory symptoms who has not already been tested. Furthermore, every death certificate has to have a cause of death listed by a physician and it's quite possible to diagnose COVID-19 as at least a contributory cause of death even if no testing has been done. If somebody with no history of chronic lung disease suddenly dies a respiratory death, you've got to have some plausible reason and in the middle of a coronavirus epidemic what else are you going to blame? I think even these clinical diagnoses should be counted in the totals if they aren't being.

By the way, where on Worldometer did you see this? I can't find any really current info on Worldometer--current as of the first week in April, not back in late March. Things are rapidly changing as to availability of testing and so on.

Yuri Apr 8, 2020 12:10 AM

^^
Pedestrian, I clicked on the "USA". It's on the April 6th (GMT) report.

BTW, I just read somewhere, not finding the link now, that Madrid might have a 50% underreporting. There are an excess of 9,000 deaths compared to the same period last year for 4,500 of confirmed Covid-19 deaths.

sopas ej Apr 8, 2020 1:07 AM

In Los Angeles mayor Eric Garcetti's daily coronavirus briefing, he announced that businesses can turn away customers not wearing face masks starting this Friday.

From LAist:

LA Mayor Garcetti: Shoppers Have To Wear Face Masks Starting Friday

Mayor Eric Garcetti is delivering his daily update on L.A.'s response to coronavirus. You can watch the live video above and follow this post for updates.

FACE MASKS NOW REQUIRED FOR BOTH SHOPPERS AND STORE EMPLOYEES

Starting Thursday night at midnight, businesses will be able to turn away customers who aren't wearing face masks, Garcetti said. Workers in grocery stores, drug stores, restaurants, hotels, taxis, rideshare vehicles, construction sites, among other non-medical essential businesses will have to start wearing face masks as well.

These employers are required to provide face masks to employees or reimburse those employees for purchasing them. They will be required to enforce social distancing for both the public and employees, and provide clean restrooms to their employees and allow those employees to wash their hands every 30 minutes.

[...]

Link: https://laist.com/latest/post/202004...angeles-update

AviationGuy Apr 8, 2020 1:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sopas ej (Post 8886780)
As a result of not going out...

From CBS2 Los Angeles:

LA Has The Cleanest Air In The World, Report Says

LOS ANGELES (CBSLA) — With so many people staying at home and off the roads, Los Angeles currently has the cleanest air in the world, according to IQ Air’s live quality city ranking.

Following the issuing of the state-wide “Safe-At-Home” orders, many residents began working from home, lowering the number of commuters on the road.

On March 18, L.A.’s infamous rush-hour traffic was moving 71 percent faster than it usually does on a Wednesday afternoon, The New York Times reported.

According to the Environmental Protection Agency, last month L.A. experienced the longest consecutive “good” air days since at least 1980.

Experts say the improvement is also due to fewer planes flying and less ground activity in general.

Link: https://losangeles.cbslocal.com/2020...UIkLE.facebook


And this has to be cleanest air in the world for a big city, right? I would think Antarctica would have cleaner air...

There are many places with cleaner air, even with the current circumstances.

eschaton Apr 8, 2020 2:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sopas ej (Post 8887348)
Ah OK. So you're not far from Tucson, a city I've never been to before.

Last year, my partner and I thought to explore Tucson (he's never been there before either). We thought to go because we heard that it's a much more interesting city than Phoenix, and it's also the first city in the US to be named a UNESCO City of Gastronomy. We being into all kinds of cuisines, we wanted to check it out, but we never ended up going.

Bisbee's on my list of places to consider retiring, which isn't that far from you. Though TBH, retirement is at least two decades away still.

LosAngelesSportsFan Apr 8, 2020 2:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jd3189 (Post 8887336)
It’s been raining a lot too. For any of you native southern Californians, has it ever been this wet and green here before?

Yes, absolutely. It happens often honestly. We all got used to the drought years between 2010 and 2016 but the decade prior was very wet if I recall correctly.

Our highest peaks in the LA area, namely Mt Baldy 10,064 feet, San Gorgonio 11,503 feet have snow packs of 10 feet plus right now which is awesome. We should be able to see snow covered peaks almost year round this year :)

Pedestrian Apr 8, 2020 2:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by eschaton (Post 8887476)
Bisbee's on my list of places to consider retiring, which isn't that far from you. Though TBH, retirement is at least two decades away still.

Bisbee's very "cute" but awfully isolated. From me it's actually on the other side of a mountain range you have to go around, to the north or south, because there's not really any road that crosses it.

SlidellWx Apr 8, 2020 2:55 AM

Some good news in Louisiana and New Orleans. The rate of new hospitalizations has slowed dramatically and the number of people on ventilators has started to decline over the past week. The governor stated that we are no longer threatened with running out of ICU beds or ventilators given the recent trends.

The state is also starting to publish onset of symptom data for confirmed cases, and it shows that 75% of all confirmed cases had an onset of symptoms on or before March 26th. Hopefully, they will add more data in the coming days, so we can see if the onset of symptoms numbers start declining in the first week of April as hospital data would suggest. The state went into lockdown on March 16th, so it looks like the stay at home orders are paying off.

https://www.theadvocate.com/baton_ro...d401d04e8.html

https://bloximages.newyork1.vip.town...d1d1.image.jpg

dave8721 Apr 8, 2020 3:57 AM

This would bode well for us in South Florida where we generally have very clean air (no topology holding in pollutants, sea breeze which blows it all away, no heavy industry/manufacturing to speak of...etc).

It makes sense, a life time of breathing in crap messes with your lungs. Similar to smoking.
https://www.cnn.com/2020/04/07/healt...ess/index.html
Quote:

Covid-19 death rate rises in counties with high air pollution, study says

You are more likely to die from Covid-19 if you live in a county in the United States with higher levels of long-term air pollution, according to new research released Tuesday by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

"We found that an increase of only 1 gram per cubic meter in fine particulate matter in the air was associated with a 15% increase in the Covid-19 death rate," said lead author Francesca Dominici, co-director of the Harvard Data Science Initiative.

sopas ej Apr 8, 2020 4:54 AM

Nearing the end of our 3rd week of stay-at-home here in California...

...by drinking a hot chocolate with ginger, anise and cinnamon. MMmmmmMMMmmm!!!
https://scontent-lax3-1.xx.fbcdn.net...75&oe=5EB32603
Photo by me

sopas ej Apr 8, 2020 6:01 PM

From ABC7 Los Angeles:

Coronavirus response: California to receive more than 200 million masks per month, Gov. Newsom says

Gov. Gavin Newsom says he's put together a deal to buy hundreds of millions of desperately needed N95 masks.

"In the last 48 hours we have secured through a consortia of non-profits and a manufacturer here in the state of California upwards of 200 million masks on a monthly basis," said Newsom.

The governor revealed the news on "The Rachael Maddow Show" on Tuesday night. Newsom said California will have enough masks to meet demand, adding that there may even be enough to send to other states.

The governor said the state has already distributed more than 41 million masks. One million of them have come from the federal government.

Newsom announced earlier the nation's most populous state would also share some of its ventilators, a necessary tool to keep struggling patients breathing, with the national stockpile even as it hunts for more of its own supplies. Newsom suggested that New York may be one of the states to receive the ventilators, but he said the federal government was best poised to decide where they were needed most.

"We're very proud to be able to extend a hand of support with those 500 ventilators and send them back east," Newsom said during a news conference. But he said the state is "not naive" to its own needs.

"We need to continue to procure more ventilators," he said.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.


Link: https://abc7.com/6086947/?ex_cid=TA_...ZK87igALr8y6sk

mrnyc Apr 8, 2020 6:18 PM

a few scenes around ny:


https://i1340.photobucket.com/albums...pssim00ai1.jpg

https://i1340.photobucket.com/albums...ps20crufdc.jpg

https://i1340.photobucket.com/albums...psulesswh6.pnghttps://i1340.photobucket.com/albums...psq507lva6.png

Pedestrian Apr 8, 2020 6:42 PM

Quote:

BART trains are mostly empty, but that doesn’t stop gate jumpers — some cars downright scary
Phil Matier April 8, 2020 Updated: April 8, 2020 6:28 a.m.

BART ridership has plummeted by more than 93 percent since the stay-at-home order was issued, and that has led to shorter service hours, longer waits between trains and near-empty stations. What hasn’t changed? The fare evaders riding the system for free.

Three weeks into the Bay Area shutdown, and BART’s two morning sweeps at San Francisco’s Embarcadero Station were pulling an average of 238 fare evaders a day off the morning-commute trains. Many of those ejected for not having a ticket were homeless or apparently mentally ill, BART officials said.

“And some are riding the system all day as a shelter,” BART Police Chief Ed Alvarez said.

BART had 24,909 riders on Monday, far below the 405,000 average daily ridership before the nine-county order went out for all nonessential Bay Area workers to stay at home.

“You might have thought that a 93% reduction in riders would have meant a reduction in fare evaders as well, but that hasn’t been the case,” BART Director Debora Allen said. She added that the people who jump the gates aren’t just cheats, they are potential health hazards to the other riders and to themselves . . . .
https://www.sfchronicle.com/bayarea/...t-15185631.php

chris08876 Apr 8, 2020 7:18 PM

Today's Conference - Cuomo; 4-8-2020

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...0ea2078a1.jpeg

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...29f5bc1f1.jpeg

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...6d37c8a0a.jpeg

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...44aa6d020.jpeg

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...0a7b966e1.jpeg

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...e6b3d8814.jpeg

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...05cfaa657.jpeg

mrnyc Apr 8, 2020 9:19 PM

ohio officially relaxed the rules and joins the booze to go with food orders brigade:

i heard it was already happening informally though lol.

https://www.the-review.com/news/2020...emplate=ampart

jtown,man Apr 8, 2020 9:21 PM

Chicago needs to open up the lakefront trail.

Within 15 seconds at an intersection, while biking, I witnessed 12 motorcycles blowing a red light running from a cop(Roosevelt and Wabash) and then about 7 teens blow the light right after them on bikes so I went ahead and went forward. One of the teens decided to yell out that I am a f*ggot.

We need safe places to bike. Period.

Pedestrian Apr 8, 2020 9:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jtown,man (Post 8888291)
Chicago needs to open up the lakefront trail.

Within 15 seconds at an intersection, while biking, I witnessed 12 motorcycles blowing a red light running from a cop(Roosevelt and Wabash) and then about 7 teens blow the light right after them on bikes so I went ahead and went forward. One of the teens decided to yell out that I am a f*ggot.

We need safe places to bike. Period.

Don't worry. Darwin has a way of being right. I hear the dinosaurs called the lttle mammals "f*ggot".

jtown,man Apr 8, 2020 9:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pedestrian (Post 8888305)
Don't worry. Darwin has a way of being right. I hear the dinosaurs called the lttle mammals "f*ggot".

lol

I couldn't believe it, definitely since they looked like they were in the 14-16-year-old range. I thought those kids were more "enlightened" than people from my generation!?

HurricaneHugo Apr 8, 2020 10:14 PM

I wonder if this pandemic will have a lasting effect on population density

Will people move out from big dense cities to the suburbs?

jtown,man Apr 8, 2020 10:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HurricaneHugo (Post 8888351)
I wonder if this pandemic will have a lasting effect on population density

Will people move out from big dense cities to the suburbs?

I mean, people are irrational. But it doesn't seem other health concerns impact people much...such as our eating habits.

destroycreate Apr 8, 2020 11:04 PM

Given how expensive all the desirable cities are, would we really mind at this point? I kind of like the idea of increased affordable housing in densely populated city centers at least for a couple of years.

Pedestrian Apr 8, 2020 11:06 PM

Quote:

San Francisco Pride should be canceled this year
By Brock Keeling@BrockKeeling Apr 8, 2020, 9:06am PDT

Despite being one of the biggest moneymakers in the city, this year’s San Francisco LGBTQ Pride Parade and related festivities should be canceled for 2020.

This year’s Pride, happening the weekend of June 27, is still continuing as planned. Fred Lopez, executive director for San Francisco Pride, told the San Francisco Chronicle that his team will move forward to have both the parade and the celebration take place while—somehow—following social distancing guidelines shortly after the SF shelter-in-place order is currently scheduled to end.

“[W]e at SF Pride are realistic that this year’s historic anniversary may look very different from what we had hoped for, and all options are on the table,” Lopez said in a statement, adding that he will work closely with our City Hall to “continually assess the outlook for gatherings like ours in the months to come.”

However, in light of the COVID-19 pandemic, quashing this year’s festivities entirely would prove a wise decision—or else risk putting the public in danger. SF Pride draws in nearly 1 million people annually. That’s a lot of people to cram into a city measuring roughly seven-by-seven miles. Those people, who come from around the world to celebrate, would need to use city infrastructure, like public transportation and city sidewalks, in heavy volume. And don’t forget about hotel taxes for which the city is most desperate.

In addition to the official Pride parade, which happens on the last Sunday in June, there’s the Dyke March and the Trans March, two tertiary events that also attract crowds.

The weekend-long celebration, which extends into the entire week, also sees bars, nightclubs, parks, theaters, and other areas busting at the seams with people. It’s too much this year. The Bay Area’s shelter-in-place is currently scheduled to end on May 3, but to view that date as anything other than a possible easing of certain restrictions would be foolhardy . . . .

https://cdn.vox-cdn.com/thumbor/pny5...1278.jpg.0.jpg
https://sf.curbed.com/2020/4/8/21213...%20this%20year

SIGSEGV Apr 8, 2020 11:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jtown,man (Post 8888291)
Chicago needs to open up the lakefront trail.

Within 15 seconds at an intersection, while biking, I witnessed 12 motorcycles blowing a red light running from a cop(Roosevelt and Wabash) and then about 7 teens blow the light right after them on bikes so I went ahead and went forward. One of the teens decided to yell out that I am a f*ggot.

We need safe places to bike. Period.

They're probably pissed the skate park is closed (and it sucks that some park district person has to camp out there in a SUV to make sure people don't use the skate park...).

HurricaneHugo Apr 8, 2020 11:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pedestrian (Post 8888405)

I would think that they're waiting for San Francisco or the state to extend the shelter at home orders or the ban on large gatherings.

Might be due to insurance purposes.

It's one thing to cancel it, another to cancel it because you can't legally hold the event.

I believe it's the same with San Diego's Comic Con.

jtown,man Apr 8, 2020 11:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SIGSEGV (Post 8888441)
They're probably pissed the skate park is closed (and it sucks that some park district person has to camp out there in a SUV to make sure people don't use the skate park...).

I've noticed that person(s). Man, what a job, I want it! lol

iheartthed Apr 8, 2020 11:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HurricaneHugo (Post 8888351)
I wonder if this pandemic will have a lasting effect on population density

Will people move out from big dense cities to the suburbs?

Somehow this correlation with population density got put into the conversation but it doesn't have a lot of support. Even in New York City the worst hit areas are in Queens, not Manhattan. Queens is the second least dense borough in NYC. The second hardest hit metro area (as of this post) is Detroit, which is not known for being high density. The third hardest hit metro area is New Orleans, also not a place known for being high density.

sopas ej Apr 9, 2020 12:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by iheartthed (Post 8888462)
Somehow this correlation with population density got put into the conversation but it doesn't have a lot of support. Even in New York City the worst hit areas are in Queens, not Manhattan. Queens is the second least dense borough in NYC. The second hardest hit metro area (as of this post) is Detroit, which is not known for being high density. The third hardest hit metro area is New Orleans, also not a place known for being high density.

Yeah, I don't think the issue is population density, but crowding, for the spread of COVID-19. Density and crowding aren't necessarily the same thing.

SIGSEGV Apr 9, 2020 12:50 AM

In Chicago the south side is the hardest hit, which is much less dense. My zip code (mostly high-rises) has lower per capita rates. Probably because we can all work from home and get our arugula delivered.

eaguir3 Apr 9, 2020 1:52 AM

Many people that live on the south side of Chicago don't have a car or depend on public transportation to get around. They're unable to buy in bulk either because of the issue of carrying bags around on a bus or simply because they can't afford to. This is primarily true in the African American neighborhoods.

There is also an issue with young black south siders still hanging out with large groups of friends. Not sure if they are unaware someone with no symptoms can spread the virus but I assume these same kids are the ones spreading the virus to their older family members. There are so many factors involved in the rapid spread on the south side of Chicago.

I've also seen stats of a spike in crime. Possibly because of the nicer weather and the fact there are so many people not working. It's like a perfect storm brewing. I hope I'm wrong.

bnk Apr 9, 2020 1:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SIGSEGV (Post 8888498)
In Chicago the south side is the hardest hit, which is much less dense. My zip code (mostly high-rises) has lower per capita rates. Probably because we can all work from home and get our arugula delivered.

Its well recognized in the medical community that there a lot more co morbidity's esp diabetes, hypertension, renal impairment from said issues and morbid obesity that is the issue here in some populations. Add up ,fact that more people reside in a residence than usual and add the fact that social distancing is less likely to happen in these areas.

I don't think it is not access to medical care. Everyone gets treated the same if they can pay or not. Its one of the first signs in all of the hospitals from the main entrance and the ER entrance in multiple languages. You don't need healthcare insurance to get the best of the best treatment and they are not even expected nor even tried to get payment from.

Its illegal not to treat anyone actually.


Its an easy answer, and I provided the causes. No links needed. Just "Anecdotal" evidence and 30 years working in a hospital deems what I say is not even worthy of a link. But if you want to google it go for it.

craigs Apr 9, 2020 1:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HurricaneHugo (Post 8888448)
I would think that they're waiting for San Francisco or the state to extend the shelter at home orders or the ban on large gatherings.

Might be due to insurance purposes.

It's one thing to cancel it, another to cancel it because you can't legally hold the event.

I believe it's the same with San Diego's Comic Con.

Let's just say the difference between a void contract and a breach of contract is huge.

Crawford Apr 9, 2020 12:37 PM

It looks like NYC's cases overwhelmingly stem from Europe. This must have been circulating for months earlier:

Most New York Coronavirus Cases Came From Europe, Genomes Show
Travelers seeded multiple cases starting as early as mid-February, genomes show.
https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/08/s...e-genomes.html

So probably originated due to heavy European cross-pollination, but wasn't noticed until it started affecting those without the interactions, but with preexisting conditions.

pdxtex Apr 9, 2020 2:06 PM

Earlier!!! I think the coasts ended up with a one two punch from across the respective oceans. Stanford researchers are theorizing that California's low numbers might be attributed to a bit of herd immunity if covid starting circulating last fall undetected like we both talked about. FAA records show California regularly gets 8000 daily passengers from mainland China during the fall and winter months...

awholeparade Apr 9, 2020 2:08 PM

I'm not considering selling my condo, but I do think that I would be handling this period much better if I had a yard and a driveway. I'm a big mountain biker and I could be screwing around in those areas on my bike, if I had them. Instead, I have to pass through common areas and multiple doors just to get outside. I bought my place specifically to be right by a great urban park, but because I'm in a dense area (for Denver), my street has the same amount of activity as ever (going to/from the park), and I don't feel comfortable going to the park because it's so packed. Again, I'm not considering selling and moving, but these are thoughts that I've had.

dave8721 Apr 9, 2020 2:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Crawford (Post 8888710)
It looks like NYC's cases overwhelmingly stem from Europe. This must have been circulating for months earlier:

Most New York Coronavirus Cases Came From Europe, Genomes Show
Travelers seeded multiple cases starting as early as mid-February, genomes show.
https://www.nytimes.com/2020/04/08/s...e-genomes.html

So probably originated due to heavy European cross-pollination, but wasn't noticed until it started affecting those without the interactions, but with preexisting conditions.

Research shows it probably started mid-February. Not "months earlier" (months earlier from now but not months earlier than thought, more like a couple of weeks earlier than we thought). If it was earlier we would have known. NYC's "die at home" is ten times the normal rate. If nurses and doctors were dropping dead in droves months ago people would have noticed (doctors and nurses probably would have noticed at least). People started getting exposed in mid-February (well before any lock downs) so some would start showing symptoms around the end of February/beginning of March but in small enough numbers to not raise any alarms (plus there was no testing).

Handro Apr 9, 2020 3:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by awholeparade (Post 8888783)
I'm not considering selling my condo, but I do think that I would be handling this period much better if I had a yard and a driveway. I'm a big mountain biker and I could be screwing around in those areas on my bike, if I had them. Instead, I have to pass through common areas and multiple doors just to get outside. I bought my place specifically to be right by a great urban park, but because I'm in a dense area (for Denver), my street has the same amount of activity as ever (going to/from the park), and I don't feel comfortable going to the park because it's so packed. Again, I'm not considering selling and moving, but these are thoughts that I've had.

Had the same thoughts. I have no plans to leave the city, but I definitely would appreciate the space/privacy a house, a yard, and a garage would offer right now. Sick of trying to open common doorknobs in our condo building with my hand in my jacket pocket!

Quote:

Originally Posted by dave8721 (Post 8888829)
Research shows it probably started mid-February. Not "months earlier" (months earlier from now but not months earlier than thought, more like a couple of weeks earlier than we thought). If it was earlier we would have known. NYC's "die at home" is ten times the normal rate. If nurses and doctors were dropping dead in droves months ago people would have noticed (doctors and nurses probably would have noticed at least). People started getting exposed in mid-February (well before any lock downs) so some would start showing symptoms around the end of February/beginning of March but in small enough numbers to not raise any alarms (plus there was no testing).

The first confirmed case in the US was in Chicago's Chinatown in mid-to-late January. This was definitely in New York (and elsewhere) at the beginning of the year. I wouldn't be surprised if the same number of people who have it in the US right now had it at some point in early February but just didn't know what it was.

mhays Apr 9, 2020 4:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by awholeparade (Post 8888783)
I'm not considering selling my condo, but I do think that I would be handling this period much better if I had a yard and a driveway. I'm a big mountain biker and I could be screwing around in those areas on my bike, if I had them. Instead, I have to pass through common areas and multiple doors just to get outside. I bought my place specifically to be right by a great urban park, but because I'm in a dense area (for Denver), my street has the same amount of activity as ever (going to/from the park), and I don't feel comfortable going to the park because it's so packed. Again, I'm not considering selling and moving, but these are thoughts that I've had.

Stairs help. A 25-minute set of stairs up / elevator down can take the place of normal exercise. Actually I find I'm working harder with stairs. All with hand sanitizer and a mask for the elevator (but not the stairs!) of course.

jd3189 Apr 9, 2020 4:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pdxtex (Post 8888781)
Earlier!!! I think the coasts ended up with a one two punch from across the respective oceans. Stanford researchers are theorizing that California's low numbers might be attributed to a bit of herd immunity if covid starting circulating last fall undetected like we both talked about. FAA records show California regularly gets 8000 daily passengers from mainland China during the fall and winter months...

This may be true. I had a cold from late January through early February. Went to the university clinic. They said it was an upper respiratory tract infection. Told me to just rest and drink lots of fluids. It took me about two weeks afterward to get rid of it.

I knew it was coronavirus ( due to the winter season), but I don’t know if it was COVID-19. If it was the latter, I’m essentially immune to this thing now and I also unknowingly spread it among my classmates through February.

10023 Apr 9, 2020 4:50 PM

I now spend at least an hour per day shopping for groceries because of social distancing and long lines to enter shops.

eschaton Apr 9, 2020 5:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10023 (Post 8888991)
I now spend at least an hour per day shopping for groceries because of social distancing and long lines to enter shops.

You still grocery shop on a daily basis? We've been trying to get to the store only once every two weeks or so.

iheartthed Apr 9, 2020 5:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by eschaton (Post 8889013)
You still grocery shop on a daily basis? We've been trying to get to the store only once every two weeks or so.

I don't know why anyone would be going everyday in this current environment.

homebucket Apr 9, 2020 5:31 PM

In an ideal environment you would grocery shop daily so you can get the freshest meat and produce available, but in this day and age, I would recommend reducing it to every other, or every few days.

10023 Apr 9, 2020 5:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by eschaton (Post 8889013)
You still grocery shop on a daily basis? We've been trying to get to the store only once every two weeks or so.

How? Food doesn’t stay fresh that long and I’m not going to live on canned goods. I also have a tiny European fridge that doesn’t hold much.


Quote:

Originally Posted by iheartthed (Post 8889027)
I don't know why anyone would be going everyday in this current environment.

Well for starters I am not remotely concerned about catching this. I’ve also probably already had it.

iheartthed Apr 9, 2020 5:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10023 (Post 8889041)
Well for starters I am not remotely concerned about catching this. I’ve also probably already had it.

But... you waste an hour standing in line everyday. Why not just buy enough so that you don't have to waste an hour standing in line everyday?

10023 Apr 9, 2020 5:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by iheartthed (Post 8889044)
But... you waste an hour standing in line everyday. Why not just buy enough so that you don't have to waste an hour standing in line everyday?

So every other day then? I don’t have an American fridge. There simply isn’t any space if one is making 2-3 meals a day for two people at home. And that’s with cooking things like beans in bulk (which of course then need to be refrigerated).

I’m also adamant about supporting local business during this time, so I’ve tried to stop going to Whole Foods (the typical UK high street grocery stores suck), and instead go to the greengrocers, a bakery, a butcher, a fishmonger, etc.

eschaton Apr 9, 2020 5:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10023 (Post 8889041)
How? Food doesn’t stay fresh that long and I’m not going to live on canned goods. I also have a tiny European fridge that doesn’t hold much.

Provided you're single and living alone, fridge size shouldn't matter that much. I'm married with two kids and we've managed to work things out, more or less.

As to the how we've done it, off the top of my head:

1. Personally drink a powdered meal replacement (Huel) for breakfast every day, and for lunch except when there's leftovers to work through.

2. We've been eating a lot of pasta (and the kids have been eating mac and cheese).

3. Produce has been burned through pretty quickly, but I still have some tomatoes and Brussels sprouts which are still good from two weeks ago. Plus lots of onions and potatoes which could go several more weeks without refrigeration.

4. Bread is the hardest thing, given my wife/kids love it, and a loaf often goes stale/moldy before the week is done. I had to break down and start freezing loafs, even though I hate it when people do that.

5. Dairy products last for two weeks no problem. Sometimes longer for cheese or yogurt.

niwell Apr 9, 2020 5:48 PM

The big grocery stores are a nightmare but local ones near me have little to no lineups - most butchers and seafood places also do delivery or curbside pickup. We order most of our vegetables from a restaurant supplier that's doing weekly deliveries. I can get good sourdough bread at a local brewery, which kills two birds with one stone (also getting beer deliveries on top of that...).

montréaliste Apr 9, 2020 5:55 PM

We have had all our grocery deliveries done by a local IGA, Costco and we have also found a local artisan group that teamed in mid crisis to deliver their goods. My wife ordered sausages, couscous meals, and a bunch of other stuff. Looking at their website, I noticed a couple of additional businesses that joined their group in the past couple of days. Some of them used to cater to major hotels and fine restaurants in the Montreal region, their clientele was therefore out of commission and they are trying to go to homebound consumers.

10023 Apr 9, 2020 6:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by eschaton (Post 8889054)
Provided you're single and living alone, fridge size shouldn't matter that much. I'm married with two kids and we've managed to work things out, more or less.

As to the how we've done it, off the top of my head:

1. Personally drink a powdered meal replacement (Huel) for breakfast every day, and for lunch except when there's leftovers to work through.

2. We've been eating a lot of pasta (and the kids have been eating mac and cheese).

3. Produce has been burned through pretty quickly, but I still have some tomatoes and Brussels sprouts which are still good from two weeks ago. Plus lots of onions and potatoes which could go several more weeks without refrigeration.

4. Bread is the hardest thing, given my wife/kids love it, and a loaf often goes stale/moldy before the week is done. I had to break down and start freezing loafs, even though I hate it when people do that.

5. Dairy products last for two weeks no problem. Sometimes longer for cheese or yogurt.

I’m not single, there are two of us.

I drink protein shakes as a supplement anyway, but meal replacement drinks are anathema to me. Food is very important to me and I love to cook.

Pasta and potatoes are far too carb heavy unless I’m doing a lot of cardio, and my wife especially considers both “special occasion” foods. And bread, well, sourdough might last a few days at a push but a baguette needs to be eaten the day it’s made. Packaged sliced white bread is not something that we buy.

I don’t know what milk you’re buying that lasts two weeks! Or even cheese.

Basically, I’m not going to compromise how I cook or eat because of this lockdown nonsense.

iheartthed Apr 9, 2020 6:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 10023 (Post 8889046)
So every other day then? I don’t have an American fridge. There simply isn’t any space if one is making 2-3 meals a day for two people at home. And that’s with cooking things like beans in bulk (which of course then need to be refrigerated).

I’m also adamant about supporting local business during this time, so I’ve tried to stop going to Whole Foods (the typical UK high street grocery stores suck), and instead go to the greengrocers, a bakery, a butcher, a fishmonger, etc.

So you don't actually have to stand in line everyday for an hour. You're just a masochist.


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