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-   -   How Is Covid-19 Impacting Life in Your City? (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showthread.php?t=242036)

chris08876 Apr 4, 2020 3:13 AM

Fine example of social distancing. :facepalm:

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...9d6a73f9b.jpeg

Qubert Apr 4, 2020 4:32 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by iheartthed (Post 8883511)
^Cuomo also made the point today that almost all first responder activity is COVID-19 related now. He suggested that crime and traffic accidents inn NYC have fallen substantially, but did not give official numbers.

I have really been proud of NYC during this crisis. I did fear if ne'er-do-wells would try for more opportunistic crimes but aside from some increases in graffiti (kids I guess) my area and most places I've gone feel safer. Public civility seems to be holding up well too, actually has gotten somewhat better since the crisis began.

Acajack Apr 4, 2020 10:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Qubert (Post 8884197)
Not to get too far off topic but:

Can people in Quebec get TV channels straight from France? I heard you say you had some French newschannels, do people typically get the full suite of Metropolitan France programming in Quebec (sports, entertainment, news, public tv like France Inter/France 2, etc)

No, unless there is something obscure I am not aware of, which would be surprising.

We can get some specialty channels like the news networks or a cultural one like Paris Première.

But not the main generalist networks equivalent to ABC CBS NBC FOX in the US.

Though we have TV5 which exists to offer a selection of their shows and also shows from other countries. Including stuff like game shows, variety shows, etc. I watch their quiz shows from time to time. Very challenging!

bnk Apr 4, 2020 2:03 PM

...

The North One Apr 4, 2020 3:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chris08876 (Post 8884139)
Fine example of social distancing. :facepalm:

Why do they have what looks like plastic bags on their hats? What is that supposed to do?

TWAK Apr 4, 2020 4:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The North One (Post 8884372)
Why do they have what looks like plastic bags on their hats? What is that supposed to do?

To protect em' from the rain droplets but not covid droplets

chris08876 Apr 4, 2020 5:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The North One (Post 8884372)
Why do they have what looks like plastic bags on their hats? What is that supposed to do?

To protect the Jewish hats (I believe they are Orthodox).

chris08876 Apr 4, 2020 5:06 PM

Today's conference (Cuomo):

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...f1363b6f6.jpeg

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...5fc53a48c.jpeg

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...539f80634.jpeg

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...85755e074.jpeg

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...379c18981.jpeg

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...a4f0930ae.jpeg

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...a51e1495c.jpeg

mousquet Apr 4, 2020 5:40 PM

I think the fact that some wild animals are coming back to cities due to the shutdown has been widely discussed on social media.
A falcon chilling on a balcony in Marseille:

https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/2086/pH79kC.jpg
https://imagizer.imageshack.com/img923/2086/pH79kC.jpg

Lol, I find it awesome! I'd forgotten there were such badass birds in the wild in our country.
Definitely not over the Paris region, though. This species must be something of southern France, possibly around the Alpine and Pyrenean mountain ranges, or maybe a Mediterranean bird.

I guess this is some kind of good time for naturalists and environmentalists... Bwaha, it's a shitty rough time to me anyway, even when I like animals.

The North One Apr 4, 2020 7:20 PM

That looks like a peregrine falcon?

Those live and nest in cities regardless of the lockdown. They're all over the US.

mousquet Apr 4, 2020 8:00 PM

^ Ah ouais, it much looks like what you're talking about.
Here's the distribution.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...neRangeMap.png
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peregrine_falcon

It is worldwide, featuring various subspecies, though. I didn't even know there were creatures like this over my own region.
Fact is you're much more likely to pass magpies and pigeons in the streets, quite obviously.
It's not like you'd see anything like this every day in the streets of Paris. Lol.

JManc Apr 4, 2020 8:15 PM

They're common in London and encouraged to keep pigeons at bay so wouldn't be surprised if they've been in Paris all along. Loads and loads of urban wildlife in Paris and tall ledges for raptors to perch on.

mousquet Apr 4, 2020 8:44 PM

You guys just made me look for more info, because this sounds strange to me.

They'd disappeared from the Paris region following WW2, and they've been back only since the early 2010s.
This is a local Pèlerin.

http://www.leparisien.fr/resizer/l--...5M73M5V5GI.jpg

Here's the French article:

http://www.leparisien.fr/info-paris-...18-7853004.php

Their regional settlement is still a bit uncertain, so some local organizations are helping them, including the vet college of my suburb of Maisons-Alfort.
I knew they weren't so common over here. I kinda know about my local menagerie, huh!

Local experts are interested in these because 1 - they look cool and 2 - they feed on pigeons for real!

Their recent coming back is completely unrelated to the current disaster indeed.

Pedestrian Apr 4, 2020 8:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mousquet (Post 8884566)
^ Ah ouais, it much looks like what you're talking about.
Here's the distribution.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikiped...neRangeMap.png
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peregrine_falcon

It is worldwide, featuring various subspecies, though. I didn't even know there were creatures like this over my own region.
Fact is you're much more likely to pass magpies and pigeons in the streets, quite obviously.
It's not like you'd see anything like this every day in the streets of Paris. Lol.

I once sat in a cafe in San Francisco's North Beach (a mostly Italian-American neighborhood with lots of sidewalk cafes) and watched a peregrine tear a pigeon apart for its own lunch. I can regularly see them soaring outside my window.

Here's a less public family meal on a San Francisco high rise (there are a number of peregrine webcams in the city):

Video Link

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tCxOkbBZmj8

dubu Apr 4, 2020 8:58 PM

How Is Corona-virus (Covid-19) Impacting Life in Your City? my 3d program isnt working. my friend can make it 3d though. ive got large paper to draw a grid on, im starting from the beginning again and then making it look like this. might as well, im not doing anything. found some grid paper and drawing grid lines on big paper will take a long time lol.

https://i.imgur.com/a0t2qQy.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/2oAnWRv.jpg

i ws trying to make the first pic the right size but i cant and turned out huge.

edit, instead of drawing a grid i could make a octagon and that will be exact and fast and easy.

Pedestrian Apr 4, 2020 9:10 PM

Quote:

Rapid Sentinel Surveillance for COVID-19 — Santa Clara County, California, March 2020
Early Release / April 3, 2020 / 69
Marissa L. Zwald, PhD1; Wen Lin, MD, PhD2; Gail L. Sondermeyer Cooksey, MPH3; Charles Weiss, MD4; Angela Suarez, MD5; Marc Fischer, MD1; Brandon J. Bonin, MS2; Seema Jain, MD3; Gayle E. Langley, MD1; Benjamin J. Park, MD1; Danielle Moulia, MPH1; Rory Benedict4; Nang Nguyen, PhD5; George S. Han, MD2 (View author affiliations)

Summary

On February 27, 2020, Santa Clara County, California, identified its first case of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) associated with probable community transmission.

During March 5–14, among patients with respiratory symptoms evaluated at one of four Santa Clara County urgent care centers serving as sentinel surveillance sites, 23% had positive test results for influenza. Among a subset of patients with negative test results for influenza, 11% had positive test results for COVID-19.

COVID-19 cases identified through this sentinel surveillance system helped confirm community transmission in the county. Local health departments can use sentinel surveillance to understand the level of community transmission of COVID-19 and to better guide the selection and implementation of community mitigation measures . . . .

Discussion

Identification of cases from this sentinel surveillance system helped confirm community transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in Santa Clara County. Among county residents evaluated at participating urgent care centers in early March with respiratory illness and no known exposure to SARS-CoV-2, approximately one quarter had positive test results for influenza, but 11% of patients with negative test results for influenza had positive test results for COVID-19. If it is assumed there were no influenza and SARS-CoV-2 coinfections and that persons with negative test results for influenza and not tested for SARS-CoV-2 were similar to those who were tested, then an estimated 8% (19 of 226) of persons seen at participating urgent care centers with respiratory symptoms had COVID-19. This is similar to the 5% SARS-CoV-2 infection rate identified among patients evaluated for mild influenza-like illness at one Los Angeles medical center during a similar time frame.

The findings in this report are subject to at least two limitations. First, SARS-CoV-2 testing was performed on a convenience sample of specimens that tested negative for influenza. Second, the findings are based on a small number of patients evaluated for respiratory illness at four participating sentinel sites and might not be representative of the broader community. However, as a result of these data and an increasing number of cases with no known source of transmission in Santa Clara County, the county initiated a series of community mitigation strategies to slow the spread of SARS-CoV-2. On March 9, the county issued recommendations to cancel gatherings of ≥1,000 people and to take action to protect vulnerable populations (e.g., older adults).* On March 16, Santa Clara County and five adjacent counties joined to order all residents to shelter in place and all schools, businesses, and government agencies to cease nonessential operations. Santa Clara County also posted updated community mitigation guidance and recommendations for populations at high risk, long-term care facilities, and hospitals.

Early implementation of community intervention is likely essential to maximize its effectiveness in slowing the spread of SARS-CoV-2. Local public health departments can use sentinel surveillance to assess the level of community transmission of COVID-19 and to better guide the selection and implementation of community mitigation measures, including the scale, timing, duration, and settings in which to focus these strategies. Sentinel surveillance in outpatient settings and emergency departments, implemented together with hospital-based surveillance, mortality surveillance, and serologic surveys, can provide a robust, multifaceted approach to monitor the epidemiology of COVID-19.
https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/69/...cid=mm6914e3_w

SIGSEGV Apr 4, 2020 9:43 PM

Au Cheval now delivers their burgers. Better than waiting in line for hours. Had one today, it was delicious.

chris08876 Apr 4, 2020 9:59 PM

NJ as of today.

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...cdb587a30d.png

chris08876 Apr 4, 2020 10:24 PM

NYC State of Emergency : Rockaway to Chinatown, Manhattan via Flatbush Ave (April 2, 2020)

Video Link

chris08876 Apr 4, 2020 10:27 PM

On a side note, I highly recommend that channel posted above. A lot of NYC travel videos during this lock down, but for those that are either bored or like to see the city, especially the lesser seen areas, like the outer boroughs, some amazing content. And with the lock down and less traffic, more ground is covered. Normally, in some cases, could take 2+ hours to cover the ground this guy is doing from Rockaway to Chinatown (does it in 45 minutes which is unheard of pre corona or unless its like 1 am). Same with some of his Queens or Bronx videos.

Like if anybody wants to take a road trip, via car to NY, and not lose their damn mind, now is the time lol. Once the traffic return, its not fun.

craigs Apr 4, 2020 10:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pedestrian (Post 8883921)

LOL, that article is about people like me and my family. On a clear day I can see Mt. Shasta from the street in front of the driveway (it is way snowier than that photo), and Mt. Lassen from the head of the driveway itself.

We rented a minivan Wednesday in Redding to move some useless and outdated items belonging to some relative or other to a storage unit, and the agent (properly distanced and wearing a mask and gloves) kept asking us if we were going to be picking a lot of people up from the airport. Like she asked three times. We weren't sure if it was better to say we'd just getting their minivan dirty as hell with furniture older than any of us, so we demurred. I imagined her going home after work and telling her family about the San Franciscans packing a van full of COVID victims to deliver to local resorts or something.

Most people up here, though, seem to be in denial--no masks, social distancing only when they are forced to do so, etc. They don't seem to think it's going to come here. I hope they are right, but I think it's just a waiting game.

At least we're more spread out up here. We don't need to worry about coming into contact with random people in the hallway and stairs, on the sidewalk, train, bus, etc. like in San Francisco. We wear our N-95 masks to the grocery store, and aside from the van rental, that's the only contact we have with the locals (today is the 14th day we've been here, and nobody is symptomatic).

chris08876 Apr 4, 2020 11:07 PM

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...886e5d71f.jpeg

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...edca4745a.jpeg

iheartthed Apr 4, 2020 11:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chris08876 (Post 8884698)
NYC State of Emergency : Rockaway to Chinatown, Manhattan via Flatbush Ave (April 2, 2020)

Video Link

This starts at the Fort Tilden exit. The best beach in the City of New York.

wwmiv Apr 5, 2020 1:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dubu (Post 8884626)
How Is Corona-virus (Covid-19) Impacting Life in Your City? my 3d program isnt working. my friend can make it 3d though. ive got large paper to draw a grid on, im starting from the beginning again and then making it look like this. might as well, im not doing anything. found some grid paper and drawing grid lines on big paper will take a long time lol.

https://i.imgur.com/a0t2qQy.jpg

https://i.imgur.com/2oAnWRv.jpg

i ws trying to make the first pic the right size but i cant and turned out huge.

edit, instead of drawing a grid i could make a octagon and that will be exact and fast and easy.

Download Steam.
Buy the full suite of Cities:Skylines and its expansions.
Play your fantasy cities in simulation style and experiment to see how they function in practice.

sopas ej Apr 5, 2020 2:35 AM

No pandemic is gonna put In-N-Out out of business. Apart from no in-restaurant dining allowed, it looks like business as usual. Yup, the drive-thru line goes around the block. This is the closest In-N-Out to my apartment.
I took these pictures around 45 minutes ago.

https://scontent-lax3-2.xx.fbcdn.net...46&oe=5EAE9C30

https://scontent-lax3-2.xx.fbcdn.net...9e&oe=5EAF608E

https://scontent-lax3-1.xx.fbcdn.net...a9&oe=5EAD2913

wwmiv Apr 5, 2020 4:32 AM

They should change their name to Wait-n-Line

sopas ej Apr 5, 2020 5:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wwmiv (Post 8884931)
They should change their name to Wait-n-Line

In-N-Out is so efficient, though; when the drive-thru line gets that long, they have workers outside walking up to the cars and taking orders; you bypass the order speaker, pay at one window, and the get your order at the 2nd window. The line moves faster than you think it would.

And for the record, I haven't been to an In-N-Out in probably over a year. I haven't had a burger in about that time, too. I started eating healthier last year, and basically stopped eating red meat (will have it on occasion, though).

sopas ej Apr 5, 2020 5:27 AM

I don't know about you guys, but with all the hand-washing I've been doing and hand sanitizer I've been using, my hands have become really dry.

This Finnish hand lotion does wonders. And it's not greasy.
https://scontent-lax3-1.xx.fbcdn.net...1e&oe=5EAE3F55
Photo by me

And this evening, I learned that this is pretty good:
https://scontent-lax3-1.xx.fbcdn.net...23&oe=5EAD1DC0
Photo by me

chris08876 Apr 5, 2020 5:16 PM

Today’s Conference (4/5/2020) - Cuomo:


https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...bcd80cffe.jpeg
https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...389ccce00.jpeg

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...a38ff3551.jpeg
https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...54fa764b8.jpeg

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...fb8192e94.jpeg
https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...5b81699d7.jpeg
https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...cdf930180.jpeg
https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...9d50a87a8.jpeg
https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...338be4401.jpeg

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...9796c739d.jpeg

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...a8e1e6e7c.jpeg

I love red dresses!

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...e89f219ca.jpeg

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...73094e04a7.png

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...a70d17fe9.jpeg

pdxtex Apr 5, 2020 8:15 PM

As far as I can tell, the Oregon and Washington graphs were flat two weeks ago. Local media reports that's only 3 percent of Seattle emergency visits are respiratory related right now also. Not declaring victory but numbers indicate everything seems to have stabilized. I hope the rest of the country can follow suit soon. Stay safe.

Pedestrian Apr 5, 2020 8:24 PM

I guess I'm going to count on this and plan my return to the Bay Area in early June:

https://uniim1.shutterfly.com/ng/ser...118202/enhance
https://covid19.healthdata.org/projections

chris08876 Apr 5, 2020 11:14 PM

Via CNN: As of now.

https://aws1.discourse-cdn.com/busin...77ccd5cfb3.png

bnk Apr 6, 2020 12:06 AM

You know I'm surprised all of these big population states with large amounts of international traveling are so low in per capita cases and deaths.


California. Florida, Texas... Very low cases per 100k... very low.

What is going one here is it the climate?


It might be a correlation or not but most states have less then <1 case per 100k and not just a few states but a lot.

Really only 3-4 states stand out. NY, NJ, LA and MI. And a couple more if you want to get picky, like CN, and WA.



But that's really it. My hospital is not on a strain, the exact opposite. We are waiting for the foot to fall and canceled all elective surgeries and outpatient surgeries and our census is only at best 60-65% normal.

A lot of surgical RN's and outpatient RN's and support staff have been furloughed btw in the last week.

Elective and outpatient surgeries are our bread and butter and that is how we as an organization makes money.

I would expect after the curve that there will be a huge backload on knee, hip replacements, and back and spinal surgeries that would have normally happened.

But it cannot be explosive because we only have so many surgeons and their teams to do it. It might have to go on 7 days a week vs 5-6 days a week as we used to see.

It could take a full year to catch up. And hopefully everyone in the hospital will fully be gainfully employed again in a few months.

SIGSEGV Apr 6, 2020 2:30 AM

Furloughing medical staff is beyond ridiculous (not blaming the hospital here, but you would think the stimulus package would have ensured hospitals are fully staffed).

pdxtex Apr 6, 2020 3:05 AM

[QUOTE=bnk;8885485]You know I'm surprised all of these big population states with large amounts of international traveling are so low in per capita cases and deaths.


California. Florida, Texas... Very low cases per 100k... very low.

What is going one here is it the climate?


It might be a correlation or not but most states have less then <1 case per 100k and not just a few states but a lot.

Really only 3-4 states stand out. NY, NJ, LA and MI. And a couple more if you want to get picky, like CN, and WA.



But that's really it. My hospital is not on a strain, the exact opposite. We are waiting for the foot to fall and canceled all elective surgeries and outpatient surgeries and our census is only at best 60-65% normal.

A lot of surgical RN's and outpatient RN's and support staff have been furloughed btw in the last week.

Elective and outpatient surgeries are our bread and butter and that is how we as an organization makes money.

I would expect after the curve that there will be a huge backload on knee, hip replacements, and back and spinal surgeries that would have normally happened.

But it cannot be explosive because we only have so many surgeons and their teams to do it. It might have to go on 7 days a week vs 5-6 days a week as we used to see.

It could take a full year to catch up. And hopefully everyone in the hospital will fully be gainfully employed again in a few months.[/QUOTE

So in your opinion, do you think we have been prudent in our actions or is this the world's largest overreaction? I just hope when the dust settles, we all hope the fallout will be worth it.....

BG918 Apr 6, 2020 3:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bnk (Post 8885485)
You know I'm surprised all of these big population states with large amounts of international traveling are so low in per capita cases and deaths.


California. Florida, Texas... Very low cases per 100k... very low.

What is going one here is it the climate?


It might be a correlation or not but most states have less then <1 case per 100k and not just a few states but a lot.

Really only 3-4 states stand out. NY, NJ, LA and MI. And a couple more if you want to get picky, like CN, and WA.



But that's really it. My hospital is not on a strain, the exact opposite. We are waiting for the foot to fall and canceled all elective surgeries and outpatient surgeries and our census is only at best 60-65% normal.

A lot of surgical RN's and outpatient RN's and support staff have been furloughed btw in the last week.

Elective and outpatient surgeries are our bread and butter and that is how we as an organization makes money.

I would expect after the curve that there will be a huge backload on knee, hip replacements, and back and spinal surgeries that would have normally happened.

But it cannot be explosive because we only have so many surgeons and their teams to do it. It might have to go on 7 days a week vs 5-6 days a week as we used to see.

It could take a full year to catch up. And hopefully everyone in the hospital will fully be gainfully employed again in a few months.

Same story here in Denver. My good friend is a doctor that does mostly elective surgeries which have all been canceled. He may have to go on unemployment due to his sharp drop in pay. He also says the hospital he works at hasn’t seen a major influx of patients, in fact it has been rather dead as in way fewer patients than they normally would see. Who knows maybe they haven’t reached the peak yet?

SIGSEGV Apr 6, 2020 3:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BG918 (Post 8885640)
Same story here in Denver. My good friend is a doctor that does mostly elective surgeries which have all been canceled. He may have to go on unemployment due to his sharp drop in pay. He also says the hospital he works at hasn’t seen a major influx of patients, in fact it has been rather dead as in way fewer patients than they normally would see. Who knows maybe they haven’t reached the peak yet?

The thing is with a doubling time of a few days, it doesn't take long from a hospital to go from half empty to overflowing.

sopas ej Apr 6, 2020 5:34 AM

It's counter-intuitive to lay off/furlough healthcare workers during a pandemic. And I'm sure many in healthcare felt that their jobs were pretty secure; can you imagine? Out of work healthcare workers. And because we here in the US use a capitalist model for healthcare, I'm sure these medical groups are "losing money" and will struggle financially, and even possibly cut healthcare workers' pay (the ones that weren't furloughed).

This pandemic has really exposed how flawed US healthcare is, especially with most Americans getting health insurance through their employers. You shouldn't have to rely on being employed to have health insurance. And obviously, with this pandemic, many are losing their jobs, and are thus losing their health insurance. We in the US really have a flawed way of how we get our healthcare.

AviationGuy Apr 6, 2020 5:38 AM

I'm currently watching a documentary of an ER, probably in NYC. It's horrifying, in that the chance of surviving once you're on a ventilator is only 20 percent. Most of those patients suffocate. All those people who don't take it seriously need to do some research on what really happens in ERs, and how many of the patients are young and have no other health problems, yet they don't make it.

Pedestrian Apr 6, 2020 7:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bnk (Post 8885485)
You know I'm surprised all of these big population states with large amounts of international traveling are so low in per capita cases and deaths.


California. Florida, Texas... Very low cases per 100k... very low.

What is going one here is it the climate?

.

California was one of the first states to lock down and before the state did it, the major metros did it about as early as anywhere in America (well before New York). My good friend got laid off from his hotel job in early March because the Mayor of San Francisco declared a state of emergency when there were just a handful of cases and most of the convention business disappeared.

Actually Santa Clara County (Silicon Valley) has about the highest per 100k rate in the state probably because it does have so much back/forth travel to China but even there there’s hope things will soon stabilize because of an early lockdown.

Pedestrian Apr 6, 2020 7:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BG918 (Post 8885640)
Same story here in Denver. My good friend is a doctor that does mostly elective surgeries which have all been canceled. He may have to go on unemployment due to his sharp drop in pay. He also says the hospital he works at hasn’t seen a major influx of patients, in fact it has been rather dead as in way fewer patients than they normally would see. Who knows maybe they haven’t reached the peak yet?

This is absurd. I can understand the psychiatrists bowing out of this for lack of relevant skills, but a surgeon? I’m an internist—we used to laugh at surgeons, calling them jumped up barbers and such but we never meant it. They certainly have plenty of relevant skill for this. They can do intubations, cut downs, tracheostomies. Basically since there’s no specific treatment for this disease, a surgeon can probably manage these patients as well as anyone.

Crawford Apr 6, 2020 11:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pedestrian (Post 8885724)
California was one of the first states to lock down and before the state did it, the major metros did it about as early as anywhere in America (well before New York).

I don't think it's reasonable to apply causation at this point. CA and NY shut down within a few days of each other, and there are states with lower rates than CA that shut down weeks later. Then there's MI, which shut down earlier than almost all states, but has one of the highest rates. Certainly shutting down is one factor of many.

Then it's difficult to do apples-apples comparison. NY's transit system ran regular schedule until a few days ago and is still at 60-70% normal usage in working class areas. You cannot really shut down the transit system. In contrast, CA doesn't need transit, and BART was running at 10% normal usage within days of the crisis.

Crawford Apr 6, 2020 11:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SIGSEGV (Post 8885599)
Furloughing medical staff is beyond ridiculous (not blaming the hospital here, but you would think the stimulus package would have ensured hospitals are fully staffed).

Lots of medical professionals are hurting, as most have no involvement in the pandemic. I have a dermatologist and dentist in the family, and both are barely working, for obvious reasons.

Acajack Apr 6, 2020 12:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sopas ej (Post 8885694)
It's counter-intuitive to lay off/furlough healthcare workers during a pandemic. And I'm sure many in healthcare felt that their jobs were pretty secure; can you imagine? Out of work healthcare workers. .

Hospitals and health care agencies saving up money in the short term in preparation for having to pay insane overtime once this thing finally hits them?

sopas ej Apr 6, 2020 2:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Crawford (Post 8885770)
I don't think it's reasonable to apply causation at this point. CA and NY shut down within a few days of each other, and there are states with lower rates than CA that shut down weeks later. Then there's MI, which shut down earlier than almost all states, but has one of the highest rates. Certainly shutting down is one factor of many.

When did social distancing start in NY? I feel like we here in California were already told to practice social distancing pretty early; I want to say at least in late February, maybe even before that. For sure by March, restaurants were already making sure that groups of people weren't seated in adjoining tables/booths. Not to say that everyone was already doing it when we were recommended to start doing it, though. Then of course by March 19, the governor told the whole state to stay at home.

sopas ej Apr 6, 2020 2:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Acajack (Post 8885780)
Hospitals and health care agencies saving up money in the short term in preparation for having to pay insane overtime once this thing finally hits them?

You're still looking at it from a capitalist point of view. If we had a government run federally funded national health care system, it would be a different story, no? Our postal service is a federal service funded by the federal government; when deliveries slow down during a slow season, you don't hear of postal workers getting laid off or furloughed.

Makes me wonder if VA healthcare workers are being furloughed/laid off? If anything I'd like to think they were ramping up.

Thinking about it now, I realize the US does have socialized medicine: The VA. But it's only for the warrior class. Only one caste in the US has access to government healthcare.

Acajack Apr 6, 2020 3:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sopas ej (Post 8885839)
You're still looking at it from a capitalist point of view. If we had a government run federally funded national health care system, it would be a different story, no? Our postal service is a federal service funded by the federal government; when deliveries slow down during a slow season, you don't hear of postal workers getting laid off or furloughed.

Makes me wonder if VA healthcare workers are being furloughed/laid off? If anything I'd like to think they were ramping up.

Thinking about it now, I realize the US does have socialized medicine: The VA. But it's only for the warrior class. Only one caste in the US has access to government healthcare.

I am looking at it from a capitalist point of view because that's totally the appropriate view to have when looking at healthcare in the U.S.

My country has universal healthcare.

The comments I made don't reflect my personal philosophy on this matter. Only the reality in the U.S.

sopas ej Apr 6, 2020 3:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Acajack (Post 8885895)
I am looking at it from a capitalist point of view because that's totally the appropriate view to have when looking at healthcare in the U.S.

My country has universal healthcare.

The comments I made don't reflect my personal philosophy on this matter. Only the reality in the U.S.

Again, this pandemic just exposes the flaw(s) of the US healthcare system of private for-profit health insurance. That was my point. From a medical and well-being of the population standpoint, it makes no sense to furlough and/or lay off healthcare workers in the middle of a pandemic.

Pedestrian Apr 6, 2020 5:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Crawford (Post 8885770)
I don't think it's reasonable to apply causation at this point. CA and NY shut down within a few days of each other, and there are states with lower rates than CA that shut down weeks later. Then there's MI, which shut down earlier than almost all states, but has one of the highest rates. Certainly shutting down is one factor of many.

Then it's difficult to do apples-apples comparison. NY's transit system ran regular schedule until a few days ago and is still at 60-70% normal usage in working class areas. You cannot really shut down the transit system. In contrast, CA doesn't need transit, and BART was running at 10% normal usage within days of the crisis.

The states did but not the metros. In CA the urban cities and counties led the state.

Maybe in NY you can’t shut down the transit system but San Francisco virtually did over the weekend. Partly it’s an aspect of aggressive distancing but also it’s because too many drivers weren’t showing up for work. And it’s just false that in the city you don’t need transit. I don’t have a car there. My friends don’t have cars there. The reason we may not need transit is because Uber has been so ubiquitous and cheap but that may be changing even without coronavirus. The blue collar work force of the city really does depend on transit.

SIGSEGV Apr 6, 2020 5:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pedestrian (Post 8885726)
This is absurd. I can understand the psychiatrists bowing out of this for lack of relevant skills, but a surgeon? I’m an internist—we used to laugh at surgeons, calling them jumped up barbers and such but we never meant it. They certainly have plenty of relevant skill for this. They can do intubations, cut downs, tracheostomies. Basically since there’s no specific treatment for this disease, a surgeon can probably manage these patients as well as anyone.

Yeah and psychiatrists can do telemedicine better than just about anyone else. Illinois at least has required that insurers fully cover telemedicine for behavioral helath.


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