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-   -   How Is Covid-19 Impacting Life in Your City? (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showthread.php?t=242036)

mhays Jul 4, 2020 10:58 PM

Depends how substantial the non-mask-wearing. In my region they've reportedly been overwhelmingly mask wearers. And the big protests are all outside.

A restaurant or bar facing other people with no mask is MANY times as risky. This is why restaurants and bars are re-closing in a lot of states.

PS, King County WA, protest hotspot and home of CHAZ/CHOP, has had reported 27 deaths and 5,083 new cases since 6/15, in a population of 2,250,000. Those are both tiny per-capita numbers compared to US averages. Just an anecdotal example.

I wasn't talking about you in any case.

Crawford Jul 5, 2020 1:34 AM

Peak protests were a month ago. There is zero evidence suggesting any type of correlation between protest counts and virus spread, which obviously makes sense, given they were outdoor, masked activities, and therefore generally low risk.

And it's just a diversionary argument for those who don't support the protests, and have no issue with state-sponsored executions of black men, as if virus spread risk were somehow justification to stifle overwhelming public anger at police conduct.

mhays Jul 5, 2020 6:05 PM

It sounds good to the Fox News crowd, which doesn't require being true.

iheartthed Jul 5, 2020 6:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Pedestrian (Post 8971142)
No, it isn't simple at all. And time is everything. As I've said, it takes time for the people infected at these events to become infectious and give it to friends who give it to other friends until it starts showing up in statistics. Links or anybody saying there's no correlation between large crowds of demonstrators and growing numbers of cases should be using the word "yet". If they aren't, they should be ignored.

Remember when people were saying Florida would be a hotspot.

Remember this:

Note how long it took for the "speculation" to become reality.

We are well past the incubation period since the start (and end) of the protests. If there was a major outbreak that was related to the protests, we would've seen it already. Not to say that participating in the protests wasn't "reckless" when considering the possible spread of the virus. But the very fact that the protests happened has taught the world a LOT about how the virus is transmitted.

SIGSEGV Jul 6, 2020 2:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by iheartthed (Post 8971673)
We are well past the incubation period since the start (and end) of the protests. If there was a major outbreak that was related to the protests, we would've seen it already. Not to say that participating in the protests wasn't "reckless" when considering the possible spread of the virus. But the very fact that the protests happened has taught the world a LOT about how the virus is transmitted.

I'm sure the protests have spread COVID-19 to some extent (surely there must be some cases), but if it were really bad, we'd probably know by now. Also, I don't understand why cops never wear masks. Are they trying to get/spread COVID-19 to get PTO?

iheartthed Jul 6, 2020 6:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by iheartthed (Post 8879964)
Let's see how well this comment ages... Prediction: Florida will be the worst outbreak in the U.S. when this is all over. It will be worse than New York.

We're getting there...

SIGSEGV Jul 6, 2020 7:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by iheartthed (Post 8972494)
We're getting there...

I don't know, looks like Arizona is giving them a run for it.

Buckeye Native 001 Jul 6, 2020 7:48 PM

Florida might look worse because they have at least twice the population of Arizona, but there's no denying it's awful in Arizona, perpetuated by incompetent governance. Per capita, we might be worse?

iheartthed Jul 6, 2020 8:00 PM

^Yeah, per capita, Arizona is worse than Florida at the moment, but Florida's cases are growing as fast as New York's did at its peak. But New York hit peak rate several weeks after implementing the shut down. Since Florida's politicians are still resisting a full stop for what is a clearly out of control outbreak, they're probably on track to blow past New York in the coming weeks. If anyone is planning to go to the RNC in Jacksonville, I wouldn't book accommodations just yet, lol.

JManc Jul 6, 2020 10:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by iheartthed (Post 8972656)
^Yeah, per capita, Arizona is worse than Florida at the moment, but Florida's cases are growing as fast as New York's did at its peak. But New York hit peak rate several weeks after implementing the shut down. Since Florida's politicians are still resisting a full stop for what is a clearly out of control outbreak, they're probably on track to blow past New York in the coming weeks. If anyone is planning to go to the RNC in Jacksonville, I wouldn't book accommodations just yet, lol.

Florida's population is also more evenly spread out than New York so the whole state could get clobbered where as mostly downstate bore the brunt of CV-19. I have relatives in the Tampa area and am more worried about them than I was about family back in NY or even here.

Pedestrian Jul 6, 2020 10:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JManc (Post 8972881)
Florida's population is also more evenly spread out than New York so the whole state could get clobbered where as mostly downstate bore the brunt of CV-19. I have relatives in the Tampa area and am more worried about them than I was about family back in NY or even here.

As a general rule, that's probably true but the population density varies from Miami-Dade which is a true dense city of course to counties in the far north-central area such as Lafayette, Suwanee, Dixie and Columbia that are very sparsely populated still.

The I-4 corridor is a population center, running from Tampa/St. Pete to Daytona through Orlando which is a major hotspot. Much of this area, though, would appear suburban to most forumers.

Pedestrian Jul 6, 2020 11:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Buckeye Native 001 (Post 8972634)
Florida might look worse because they have at least twice the population of Arizona, but there's no denying it's awful in Arizona, perpetuated by incompetent governance. Per capita, we might be worse?

Arizona's governor is leaving things up to counties and incorporated cities are defying county policies. Where my house is is in a retirement area where the average age is 73 but it abuts an incorporated town with an average age of 35. The county (Pima) has a mask order but the town (Sahuarita) is defying it and refusing to require businesses to require masks. The seniors living outside the town limits are clearly taking their lives in their hands if they shop in stores within the town limits (except for one or two that are instituting mask requirements of their own because they recognize where their business comes from and who their customers are).

It is this sort of chaos that caused me to leave (plus the unbearable--for me--summer heat).

By the way: So much for the idea this virus would go away when summer came or that it was heat intolerant.

The North One Jul 8, 2020 1:27 AM

So Florida is now the new epicenter and Disneyland re-opens anyway.

cool

SIGSEGV Jul 8, 2020 3:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The North One (Post 8974122)
So Florida is now the new epicenter and Disneyland re-opens anyway.

cool

The Magic Kingdumb.

dave8721 Jul 8, 2020 5:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by The North One (Post 8974122)
So Florida is now the new epicenter and Disneyland re-opens anyway.

cool

Disneyland is in California :D
Can you imagine having to wear a mask at all times in July at Disneyworld (it was 94 in Orlando yesterday, 93 the day before).
Universal in Orlando has been open for over a month

Crawford Jul 8, 2020 12:29 PM

I don't understand how it's even worth it to open places like Disneyworld right now. Who wants to be outdoors all day in the summer Florida sun, masked?

Then half the attractions are closed and all the special events (fireworks, parades, etc.) are cancelled. And the Disney parks are obvious global attractions, and practically no one can even enter the U.S. for leisure purposes. So what's the point? A typical family is gonna drop 5k to play Russian Roulette and visit Pandemic Mickey?

mrnyc Jul 8, 2020 12:36 PM

are we sure there is no price break?

everything seems to be holding out on lowering prices, but how much longer? its all got to give at some point.

suburbanite Jul 8, 2020 12:57 PM

A friend works for Ernst & Young where their entire 10 floor Toronto office is all "hoteling" desks where you have to book a seat every day if you're going to the office. Even partners' offices are opened up to everyone else if they are out of office. How they plan to logistically sterilize such an operation when they return to work is beyond me.

Some companies have put out thought pieces on how this may reverse the decades long trend of moving towards open concept flexible workplaces. I think people have short memories and are still going to flinch at spending hundreds of thousands to revert back to a cubicle & corner office setup.

iheartthed Jul 8, 2020 3:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by suburbanite (Post 8974403)
A friend works for Ernst & Young where their entire 10 floor Toronto office is all "hoteling" desks where you have to book a seat every day if you're going to the office. Even partners' offices are opened up to everyone else if they are out of office. How they plan to logistically sterilize such an operation when they return to work is beyond me.

Some companies have put out thought pieces on how this may reverse the decades long trend of moving towards open concept flexible workplaces. I think people have short memories and are still going to flinch at spending hundreds of thousands to revert back to a cubicle & corner office setup.

These types of offices are already cleaned daily, so places with a hoteling policy/culture are probably better able to adapt than others. This is the same model that WeWork and other shared workspace competitors use.

suburbanite Jul 8, 2020 6:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by iheartthed (Post 8974496)
These types of offices are already cleaned daily, so places with a hoteling policy/culture are probably better able to adapt than others. This is the same model that WeWork and other shared workspace competitors use.

I've seen what our cleaning crew does to the limited hoteling spaces/offices we have and it's a far cry from sterilizing every surface, filing drawer handle, computer monitor, etc. I doubt many previous cleaning services were as thorough as this system will require, and time and costs will likely go up.


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