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-   -   CHICAGO: Transit Developments (https://skyscraperpage.com/forum/showthread.php?t=101657)

oshkeoto Jul 19, 2014 3:29 PM

From the CTA's perspective, it was good to push people away from disposable dip cards because they're expensive to keep making and keep getting thrown away. (As an added bonus, also bad for the environment.) That's partly why the single-rides are now $3 - to strongly encourage anyone who rides more than once to get a plastic Ventra.

Ventra also means that they only have to make two kinds of cards - the heavy plastic one and the single-rides - instead of the dozen or so previous kinds. Instead of having separate cards for regular fare, low fare, seven-day pass, 30-day pass, etc., all of those functions can just be loaded onto a plastic Ventra card. Cheaper, more efficient, environmentally friendly, etc.

Ventra can also be registered, so if you lose your card, you don't actually lose the money on it.

And the longer-term reason is to move towards an open fare system, where people can use regular bank cards and phone apps to pay and don't have to have any CTA fare media at all.

Also, the MTA actually uses the exact same private company to do their cards as CTA uses for Ventra.

OhioGuy Jul 19, 2014 9:18 PM

Morgan Street 'L' Station Helping Fuel West Loop Boom, CTA Says

Quote:

A section of the West Loop once riddled with vacant stores has become a booming section of the city thanks in part to the Morgan Street "L" Station, the CTA and and the local alderman agreed.

Findings from an informal CTA study showed that since the station opened in May 2012, residential and business development in the surrounding neighborhood has continued at a "faster pace than nearly all other markets within the city during the post-recession period," CTA spokeswoman Catherine Hosinski said.
Quote:

In June 2013, Google announced it would move its regional headquarters to the West Loop in part because of the new station. A stream of restaurants also opened within walking distance of the station, including Fulton Market Kitchen, The Garage, Vera Chicago, Graham Elliot Bistro and Green Street Meats.

The station's impact was felt in the area almost immediately after plans for its construction were announced in August 2010, Hosinski said. In the 21 months before the station opened, the number of new business licenses doubled, commercial properties that sat vacant for years were leased, and new spaces have been constructed, Hosinski said.
Quote:

While Hosinski admitted that the West Loop was showing signs of becoming a booming neighborhood before the station was built, she said its presence has contributed to the migration of commuters and residents to the area.

"You look at the heart of most of Chicago neighborhoods and you're going to see a CTA station," Hosinski said. The Morgan Street Station "is helping transform the West Loop from a destination to a community."

After the real estate crash, the West Loop "was kind of stagnant. The "L" stop came after the crash and helped stabilize the community," Burnett said. "Now you have condo owners back, and more developers at the table trying to develop."

Baronvonellis Jul 19, 2014 11:42 PM

Also, it seems like the banks can charge whatever they want. I rode the train about 10 times last month using my bank card. I got charges for $2.25, $4, $4.50, and $5 from ventra.

How do you get charged $4 or $5 when taking the train?

Quote:

Originally Posted by oshkeoto (Post 6661335)
From the CTA's perspective, it was good to push people away from disposable dip cards because they're expensive to keep making and keep getting thrown away. (As an added bonus, also bad for the environment.) That's partly why the single-rides are now $3 - to strongly encourage anyone who rides more than once to get a plastic Ventra.

Ventra also means that they only have to make two kinds of cards - the heavy plastic one and the single-rides - instead of the dozen or so previous kinds. Instead of having separate cards for regular fare, low fare, seven-day pass, 30-day pass, etc., all of those functions can just be loaded onto a plastic Ventra card. Cheaper, more efficient, environmentally friendly, etc.

Ventra can also be registered, so if you lose your card, you don't actually lose the money on it.

And the longer-term reason is to move towards an open fare system, where people can use regular bank cards and phone apps to pay and don't have to have any CTA fare media at all.

Also, the MTA actually uses the exact same private company to do their cards as CTA uses for Ventra.


ardecila Jul 19, 2014 11:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Baronvonellis (Post 6661767)
Also, it seems like the banks can charge whatever they want. I rode the train about 10 times last month using my bank card. I got charges for $2.25, $4, $4.50, and $5 from ventra.

How do you get charged $4 or $5 when taking the train?

You should talk about this with your bank... maybe they have some weird fee for contactless transactions. My standard Ventra card has worked without a hitch since I got it in January.

ardecila Jul 20, 2014 9:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ardecila (Post 6657568)
^ That's one part of the concept, but it sounds like he's also proposing some kind of downtown light rail.

For reference, here is the ill-fated Central Area Circulator plan (commonly known as Daley's Trolley) that continues to inform discussions of downtown transit. The north end is cut off here but I believe it was intended to be at Clark/Division.

https://farm4.staticflickr.com/3356/...a5665b93_b.jpg
flickr/mister scantastic




Then the modified version from 2008's Central Area Action plan:

http://www.thetransportpolitic.com/w...tor-Routes.png
src

the urban politician Jul 21, 2014 12:01 AM

Well, something eventually needs to happen. Perhaps it will take more population in the core to finally spur some sort of action

N830MH Jul 21, 2014 3:01 AM

What happened? Why they didn't have streetcar or light rail? They should considering this. The traffic is very bad. You will struck on the traffic. Chicago is a busiest city.

CTA Gray Line Jul 21, 2014 1:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by OhioGuy (Post 6661638)

But of course this wouldn't work to create the same types of Development on the South Side with a new CTA Gray Line "L": http://bit.ly/GrayLineInfo

ardecila Jul 22, 2014 1:22 AM

No, it wouldn't. The Green Line had a station at Halsted until 1998 but it didn't cause a residential boom. There are still many many L stations surrounded by blighted and vacant buildings.

Unfortunately I think West Loop residential and club/restaurant development was NOT sparked by a new CTA station; the demand was already existing. The station did made Fulton Market into an appealing office/hotel destination, though.

Mr Roboto Jul 22, 2014 1:28 AM

Well, lets watch what happens on Cermak and see if the new station there has any effect.

There have been a few new businesses in the last few years (and an empty Lex building that converted to apartments), but the slow progression from the roosevelt towards south has not reached any real momentum south of 18th. If rapid growth on Cermak follows the completion of this station, I would think it would show these stations do indeed have an effect in already slightly developing at least. Maybe not the sole reason for increased development, but a major push to get it over the hill, so to speak.

Im not sure where any 'gray line' would have a similar effect though along the south lake shore. I think some existing momentum is required. Maybe near oakwood shores? hyde park? It would be rather far from the street and not as accessible as these green line stations though.

wierdaaron Jul 23, 2014 3:51 AM

Here's the newly designed stairway canopy for the Harrison Red Line station still undergoing rehab.

http://i.imgur.com/OWaIn7zl.jpg

Looks like I unintentionally MC-Eschered the perspective with Jones Prep on that, so here's a bonus:

http://i.imgur.com/yNSHdWDl.jpg

http://cdn.cstatic.net/images/gridfs...isonent_tt.jpg
http://chicago.curbed.com/archives/2...-10m-rehab.php

Chi-Sky21 Jul 23, 2014 12:59 PM

It really does look like it was designed to go along with Jones Prep.

Mr Downtown Jul 23, 2014 1:20 PM

I tried to persuade the PBC to integrate a new entrance (with elevator) into the new Jones, at the northwest corner of State & Polk, but I didn't get very far. Something about a water line being located there. I'm not sure why the idea of off-sidewalk entrances seems so alien to CDOT when it's so common in other cities with subways. Seems like it would be a good way to get other people to pay for the new elevators and escalators.

UPChicago Jul 23, 2014 4:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mr Downtown (Post 6665691)
I tried to persuade the PBC to integrate a new entrance (with elevator) into the new Jones, at the northwest corner of State & Polk, but I didn't get very far. Something about a water line being located there. I'm not sure why the idea of off-sidewalk entrances seems so alien to CDOT when it's so common in other cities with subways. Seems like it would be a good way to get other people to pay for the new elevators and escalators.

You mean like one that is inside the building?

Mr Downtown Jul 23, 2014 6:09 PM

Yup. One that is integrated into a new building, behind the property line. The ones at State Place, Merchandise Mart, and at Thompson Center/203 N. LaSalle are Chicago's sole examples, even though there are lots of places where the city has owned the property adjacent to a station in recent years and then sold it (usually for a song) for redevelopment.

Chi-Sky21 Jul 23, 2014 6:13 PM

Not so sure i would want all that subway rider traffic going through a school. I would have major security issues with that.

ardecila Jul 23, 2014 6:35 PM

Not really a security risk... the subway entrance would not be connected to the inside of the school. The one at State Place (Roosevelt) is a good example. The school isn't really a terrorism target either.

Mr D, do you know anything about an off-street entrance at Clark/Division? Plans show a entrance to the SRO "hotel" at the southwest corner directly from the mezzanine.

wierdaaron Jul 23, 2014 6:42 PM

In DC, every subway station I can think of is inside some kind of building. The entrance is usually a doorway at street level where you go in, then down several sets of escalators until you're near the core of the planet. The stations usually don't offer connections to their parent building unless it's a public thing like a mall. I hadn't thought about that in comparison to here.

NYC has a lot of sidewalk cuts though, so it's not like it's totally unusual.

ardecila Jul 23, 2014 10:41 PM

^ NY also offers zoning bonuses for subway improvements, so developers have an incentive to provide them. The one at 53rd/Lex is pretty cool, built into Citicorp Center.

denizen467 Jul 24, 2014 3:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mr Downtown (Post 6666172)
Yup. One that is integrated into a new building, behind the property line. The ones at State Place, Merchandise Mart, and at Thompson Center/203 N. LaSalle are Chicago's sole examples

What about the NE corner of State & Grand, inside the property line of the Hilton (or the Weber Grill restaurant, if you will) building? Or is that just an emergency exit?


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