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Segun Mar 25, 2023 2:18 AM

In a perfect world, the South Side will revitalize with a new motif of odd looking low rise buildings and create a visual style apart from the North Side, representative of the culture and its people, to further peak the interest of potential tourists to Chicago.

nomarandlee Mar 25, 2023 3:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sentinel (Post 9901591)
Meanwhile, these are other dedicated cancer hospitals in other major cities, recently completed or under construction:

Form can and should follow function, but that doesn't mean that a design should be utterly banal and forgettable, like UCM's new building, especially given what other comparable institutions are building. Then again, UCM's campus is forgettable to begin with because leadership within the organization is exceptionally out of touch and have no desire to be considered cutting edge, even when it comes to their overall practice philosophy. I worked on numerous feasibility and design studies as well as 15 interior renovation, build-out and new construction projects for the hospital system there for a number of years. They genuinely do not give a shit, regardless of how hard their marketing department tries to paint them as that; I'll be happy to name names.

To each his own, but I think only the 4th and maybe the 3rd examples are clearly better than the UC example.

WestsideLA Mar 25, 2023 4:26 AM

An indirect comment here... Going back to my recent harping on the campus plan or land use, I do think there has been some improvement in this regard in recent years.

For instance, when the Biological Sciences Learning Center was built, it was just kind of stuck in the middle of a back alley. Now the University has taken steps to turn that block into the North Science Quad.

And the Crerar Library was just plopped down in the middle of the Science Quad. I think both were just examples of budget constraints and a desire to save money. But recently, the University knocked down that old Post Office building and took steps to improve the area by extending the 58th St. Pedestrian zone. (Finally they were willing to knock down Phemister Hall and replace it with the Gordon Center.)

These observations have some bearing on the Medical Center complex because I think for a while the plan was to just stick as many buildings into Maryland Avenue as possible. But even things like that pocket park by the Cancer Hospital show some desire to get away from this. Although the problem now is that there is a history you have to live with in that area.

Elsewhere on campus the University has shown a willingness to spend money to knock down obsolete buildings. For instance, Mott got knocked down and The Rube and The Study got built. They didn't just stick those behind Mott to save money. Similarly, they are knocking down the old research institute building to build the New Science and Engineering Building.

So I hope the overall mentality is improving...

Jibba Mar 27, 2023 9:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sentinel (Post 9901591)
Meanwhile, these are other dedicated cancer hospitals in other major cities, recently completed or under construction:

I don't see any meaningful distinction between any of these vis a vis the U of C hospital. It's all the same formula: either add curvilinear or extraneous jaunty fa├žade elements or both; whatever they think will preclude the patient's perception that the structure's appearance is foreboding in any way (i.e., a semblance of institutional mega-medicine). That is, of course, until those differentiated styles become the known symbols of institutional mega-medicine themselves, at which point the aesthetic project begins anew.

sentinel Mar 28, 2023 1:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by WestsideLA (Post 9901673)
An indirect comment here... Going back to my recent harping on the campus plan or land use, I do think there has been some improvement in this regard in recent years.

For instance, when the Biological Sciences Learning Center was built, it was just kind of stuck in the middle of a back alley. Now the University has taken steps to turn that block into the North Science Quad.

And the Crerar Library was just plopped down in the middle of the Science Quad. I think both were just examples of budget constraints and a desire to save money. But recently, the University knocked down that old Post Office building and took steps to improve the area by extending the 58th St. Pedestrian zone. (Finally they were willing to knock down Phemister Hall and replace it with the Gordon Center.)

These observations have some bearing on the Medical Center complex because I think for a while the plan was to just stick as many buildings into Maryland Avenue as possible. But even things like that pocket park by the Cancer Hospital show some desire to get away from this. Although the problem now is that there is a history you have to live with in that area.

Elsewhere on campus the University has shown a willingness to spend money to knock down obsolete buildings. For instance, Mott got knocked down and The Rube and The Study got built. They didn't just stick those behind Mott to save money. Similarly, they are knocking down the old research institute building to build the New Science and Engineering Building.

So I hope the overall mentality is improving...

UCM planning and main UC campus planning are managed by two individual capital and facilities teams, because they are separate entities. While the main campus has a great track record in terms of hiring great design teams that have completed important, thoughtful, utilitarian buildings of interest, I personally do not feel that UCM has the same success. I understand fully that it's an apples-to-oranges comparison, especially because UCM is a far more specialized entity than the University as a whole. But UCM-specific campus planning is far less concerned about pedestrian, and general user engagement than their University counterpart.

Rally Monkey Mar 29, 2023 4:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sentinel (Post 9903802)
UCM planning and main UC campus planning are managed by two individual capital and facilities teams, because they are separate entities. While the main campus has a great track record in terms of hiring great design teams that have completed important, thoughtful, utilitarian buildings of interest, I personally do not feel that UCM has the same success. I understand fully that it's an apples-to-oranges comparison, especially because UCM is a far more specialized entity than the University as a whole. But UCM-specific campus planning is far less concerned about pedestrian, and general user engagement than their University counterpart.

I agree with this. That's why I appreciate the new cancer hospital's pedestrian-friendly design elements, particularly the pocket park and the mid-block connector on the north side. Those are small things, I guess, but I think they reflect a different mindset than the mega-buildings with skybridges philosophy of other recent UCM projects. The University's plan to extend the 58th Street pedestrian walk to Drexel and turn the old hospital emergency room entrance parking lot into a landscaped plaza is a hopeful sign, too.

BrinChi Mar 29, 2023 4:24 PM

BTW does anyone know if the current UCM Emergency Room is permanent? They recaptured space from a parking garage structure, and it's quite obvious. I had to go there over the weekend, and the entrance/waiting room seem like complete afterthoughts. I've waited in nicer bus stations (even in the US). I understand that 90% of the people going through the ER there are going to be poor, but come on! And I recognize that some of this might be quick and dirty changes to support the demand during Covid, which is why I'm asking and hoping they'll improve or move the space again in the near future.

sentinel Mar 29, 2023 6:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BrinChi (Post 9904964)
BTW does anyone know if the current UCM Emergency Room is permanent? They recaptured space from a parking garage structure, and it's quite obvious. I had to go there over the weekend, and the entrance/waiting room seem like complete afterthoughts. I've waited in nicer bus stations (even in the US). I understand that 90% of the people going through the ER there are going to be poor, but come on! And I recognize that some of this might be quick and dirty changes to support the demand during Covid, which is why I'm asking and hoping they'll improve or move the space again in the near future.

Damn - well, first off, hope you're doing better..second, not really sure about that ER. I always thought it was planned to be permanent, especially to fill a need for no higher level ER in the immediate vicinity, that UCM rightfully caught a lot of flak for a few years back, well before Covid, iirc.

BrinChi Mar 29, 2023 6:45 PM

Ucm er
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by sentinel (Post 9905101)
Damn - well, first off, hope you're doing better..second, not really sure about that ER. I always thought it was planned to be permanent, especially to fill a need for no higher level ER in the immediate vicinity, that UCM rightfully caught a lot of flak for a few years back, well before Covid, iirc.

Thank you. I got a blood clot in my leg from an international flight last week, unfortunately. I'll be fine, it's more annoying than anything. Let that be a lesson to make sure you get up and stretch your legs on long flights... and those of us who WFH should also be careful.

Anyway, about the ER: I imagine the existence of the ER itself is definitely permanent. I also recall reading about its opening several years back, so I was expecting state of the art. It was originally located around 58th and Maryland - I never visited at this location, but sometime since the end of 2020 it relocated to 57th and Maryland, and this structure used to be exclusively a parking garage. I'm not sure why it was relocated and I even tried to ask a few nurses and staff to get background about the relocation but they didn't have much info. The current facility seems like a patchwork buildout, so that's why I'm wondering if this is intended to be its permanent home, and if they plan to improve it in the near future. I sure hope so!

Rally Monkey Mar 29, 2023 7:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BrinChi (Post 9905142)
Thank you. I got a blood clot in my leg from an international flight last week, unfortunately. I'll be fine, it's more annoying than anything. Let that be a lesson to make sure you get up and stretch your legs on long flights... and those of us who WFH should also be careful.

Anyway, about the ER: I imagine the existence of the ER itself is definitely permanent. I also recall reading about its opening several years back, so I was expecting state of the art. It was originally located around 58th and Maryland - I never visited at this location, but sometime since the end of 2020 it relocated to 57th and Maryland, and this structure used to be exclusively a parking garage. I'm not sure why it was relocated and I even tried to ask a few nurses and staff to get background about the relocation but they didn't have much info. The current facility seems like a patchwork buildout, so that's why I'm wondering if this is intended to be its permanent home, and if they plan to improve it in the near future. I sure hope so!

I have no inside information on this at all, but my understanding is that the University's long-term plan is to remodel or replace the older buildings that currently house the Mitchell Hospital. Maybe the plan is to move the emergency facilities back there.

sentinel Mar 29, 2023 8:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rally Monkey (Post 9905188)
I have no inside information on this at all, but my understanding is that the University's long-term plan is to remodel or replace the older buildings that currently house the Mitchell Hospital. Maybe the plan is to move the emergency facilities back there.

My old firm responded to an RFP about that back in 2018(?), about converting Mitchell into a dedicated cancer hospital, but iirc, there were many building system issues that would have made an easy conversion somewhat cost-prohibitive..? I think there were other issues, I just can't remember right now what they were, I'm sure other forumers might have better memories.

I mentioned this sometime last year but perhaps bears repeating: one thing to keep in mind is that the University and UCM are collaborating for a long-term capital planning initiative to create a 'West Campus', near the 55th St Green line stop. Mostly because the main campus is already fairly packed (north of the Midway), but also because they are trying hard(er) to be better engaged in the immediate South side community, work with residents, community organizations, etc., to act as a catalyst for better development in that area, and not as an island anymore. One of the first projects that is currently under construction/renovation is a fossil research lab, with a community outreach program, and it should be wrapping up construction this year. I do not know if the University currently has a comprehensive, overall master plan for these new sites, but they've quietly been purchasing lots in and around that 2-3 block radius near the station for a few years, so SOMETHING is definitely brewing..

lakeshoredrive Mar 29, 2023 9:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sentinel (Post 9905246)
My old firm responded to an RFP about that back in 2018(?), about converting Mitchell into a dedicated cancer hospital, but iirc, there were many building system issues that would have made an easy conversion somewhat cost-prohibitive..? I think there were other issues, I just can't remember right now what they were, I'm sure other forumers might have better memories.

I mentioned this sometime last year but perhaps bears repeating: one thing to keep in mind is that the University and UCM are collaborating for a long-term capital planning initiative to create a 'West Campus', near the 55th St Green line stop. Mostly because the main campus is already fairly packed (north of the Midway), but also because they are trying hard(er) to be better engaged in the immediate South side community, work with residents, community organizations, etc., to act as a catalyst for better development in that area, and not as an island anymore. One of the first projects that is currently under construction/renovation is a fossil research lab, with a community outreach program, and it should be wrapping up construction this year. I do not know if the University currently has a comprehensive, overall master plan for these new sites, but they've quietly been purchasing lots in and around that 2-3 block radius near the station for a few years, so SOMETHING is definitely brewing..

What would the west campus consists of? New academic buildings with a quad and a dorm? Some administrative buildings?

sentinel Mar 29, 2023 9:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lakeshoredrive (Post 9905289)
What would the west campus consists of? New academic buildings with a quad and a dorm? Some administrative buildings?

From what I recall, it would be primarily science/research-related buildings, with classrooms, labs, etc., but that would also have community outreach elements..at least, the project I previously mentioned would be a prototype for those type of facilities. And I think (BIG think) is that they would start with one facility or center, and then slowly populate the lots that they own over time and depending on future neeeds.

Things change on a regular basis when it comes to campus planning and development, so what was planned last year may have already evolved into something different, I do not know. But the University's main goal is to be more present and engaging within the communities surrounding UC.

lakeshoredrive Mar 29, 2023 9:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sentinel (Post 9905318)
But the University's main goal is to be more present and engaging within the communities surrounding UC.

That's really good. Will be very good in the long run.

Klippenstein Mar 29, 2023 11:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sentinel (Post 9905246)
One of the first projects that is currently under construction/renovation is a fossil research lab, with a community outreach program, and it should be wrapping up construction this year.

Where is this exactly?

sentinel Mar 29, 2023 11:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Klippenstein (Post 9905459)
Where is this exactly?

Wabash and Garfield blvd.

Rally Monkey Mar 30, 2023 12:27 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sentinel (Post 9905471)
Wabash and Garfield blvd.

Hm. That's where the Schulze Baking Company Building is. No open lots around there, and it's at the outskirts of the Green Line redevelopment zone. I'd be surprised if the University was eyeing any projects that far from Washington Park.

Is this the project you have in mind: https://scitopiachicago.org/? It's a planned STEAM center for teens that's headed up by a U of C paleontologist.

ShadowArch Mar 30, 2023 4:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Rally Monkey (Post 9905503)
Hm. That's where the Schulze Baking Company Building is. No open lots around there, and it's at the outskirts of the Green Line redevelopment zone. I'd be surprised if the University was eyeing any projects that far from Washington Park.

Is this the project you have in mind: https://scitopiachicago.org/? It's a planned STEAM center for teens that's headed up by a U of C paleontologist.

I live nearby, and there's absolutely an active renovation permit on the block, associated with the university. Work has been ongoing for a few months now, but this is the first time I've seen anything, even speculative, about the nature of the project. If it's a public facing program like this, then I'll be stoked!

Tombstoner Mar 30, 2023 9:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BrinChi (Post 9904964)
I had to go there over the weekend, and the entrance/waiting room seem like complete afterthoughts.

Same with the Northwestern ER in Streeterville. Just spaces to process people...

sentinel Mar 30, 2023 1:47 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ShadowArch (Post 9905619)
I live nearby, and there's absolutely an active renovation permit on the block, associated with the university. Work has been ongoing for a few months now, but this is the first time I've seen anything, even speculative, about the nature of the project. If it's a public facing program like this, then I'll be stoked!

Yup! Across the street from Schulze.


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