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PartyLine Feb 2, 2010 4:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by FortyAcres (Post 4676537)
I believe thats the new W in Austin (which is mixed hotel/condo/new Austin City Limits studios).

At least its one of the three or so renderings before they finalized this one:

http://78701lofts.com/downtown-austi...el/primary.jpg


Yeah that's the new W hotel and condos here in Austin

http://www.block21residences.com/

http://www.austintowers.net/at/condo...o/w_hotel.html

NorthScottsdale Feb 2, 2010 5:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by glynnjamin (Post 4676922)
^Why? We don't have enough in the Valley? There are like 12 of them.

Why not? Why not open one up downtown as well? People in this city are addicted to chains.. it's familiar and people know it. And what's wrong with their food? I think it's delicious. I think Downtown needs more chains.. Obviously I like independent restaurants as well, but I'm sure a few familiar chains would draw people...

Vicelord John Feb 2, 2010 5:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NorthScottsdale (Post 4678559)
Why not? Why not open one up downtown as well? People in this city are addicted to chains.. it's familiar and people know it. And what's wrong with their food? I think it's delicious. I think Downtown needs more chains.. Obviously I like independent restaurants as well, but I'm sure a few familiar chains would draw people...

The unfortunate thing about what you just said is (except for them having delicious food) you are completely right.

People flock to corporations because there is a notion they are better quality. We all know that can be either right or wrong at any place at any time.

PartyLine Feb 2, 2010 6:45 PM

Hey is Hops brew pub still open out there? went there a few times it was pretty good can't remember which one I went to think it was on Scottsdale Rd. and there used to be a Carmelo's Italian Restaurant like we have here in Austin it's closed I know.

glynnjamin Feb 2, 2010 6:46 PM

As far as I can tell, the TGI Fridays downtown and the Hard Rock aren't nearly as busy as Matt's, Biancos, or even Portlands. We don't need any more chains downtown and we don't need a shitty Yardhouse. I'd rather a real brewery go in to the warehouse district and make their own beer.

Vicelord John Feb 2, 2010 7:42 PM

Yeah but we do need to put oir personal wants aside if we want to bring in the "masses."

Leo the Dog Feb 2, 2010 9:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by glynnjamin (Post 4678767)
As far as I can tell, the TGI Fridays downtown and the Hard Rock aren't nearly as busy as Matt's, Biancos, or even Portlands. We don't need any more chains downtown and we don't need a shitty Yardhouse. I'd rather a real brewery go in to the warehouse district and make their own beer.

True, however, who goes to Hard Rock anymore? And, Front Row isn't the standard TGI Fridays...they close at 7pm most nights and most people looking for food aren't going to walk to a ball field unless its on game night.

BTW, I'll take Cibo any day over Bianco. IMO, better all around experience from the food, to the atmosphere, to the seating.

KEVINphx Feb 2, 2010 9:36 PM

Some very condescending bitches on this board, and I am not a fan of The Yardhouse. . .

It also goes without saying that there is a "perceived" quality with independent restaurants that is also right or wrong at probably the same, if not a higher, rate as corporate chains.

I would even replace the "quality" perception at chains with the words "predictable" or "familiar"

Either way, it's not like downtown is limited for space for future restaurants, retail etc

dtnphx Feb 3, 2010 12:08 AM

Channel 12 could move to The Arizona Republic's building

Gannett Co., Inc. parent company of The Arizona Republic and Channel 12, may move the television station into the Republic's downtown Phoenix mid-rise.

Under the plan, the ground floor of the Republic's offices at 200 E. Van Buren would be reconfigured so that visitors walking in downtown Phoenix would be able to see KPNX's studios.

The plans are just preliminary, said John Zidich publisher of The Arizona Republic. Gannett is working on a feasibility study to determine if the move makes financial and logistical sense, he said.

"We think there are great synergies for both of our platforms," Zidich said. "We also think that it could be a really exciting, new draw to downtown as we position the studios so that the outside world can see inside."

Another reason the media company is probably considering the move: both the TV and newspaper staffs are smaller. At its peak, KPNX had 190 employees, now there are 160, according to the general manager. Layoffs and downsizing have also shrunk the newspaper's staff.

Zidich didn't specify how much The Arizona Republic's staffing has changed at its Van Buren building, saying the possible move isn't motivated by efficiency.

"The reason to do this is strategic," Zidich said. "Having available space makes it easier but is not a reason."

The news involves two key pieces of downtown Phoenix real estate. KPNX occupies two buildings at 1101 N. Central Ave., a key intersection along the Central Avenue corridor.

"It's attractive in the sense that it is on the northern border or downtown, directly on the light rail," said John Misner, president and general manager of Channel 12. "It's next to the (Hance) park, it's not too far away from ASU's downtown campus. You have good access to the I-10."

The Arizona Republic sits at Second and Van Buren streets, steps away from the Phoenix Convention Center and the Arizona Center complex of shops and offices.

Gannett has been working closely with Phoenix city officials to iron out logistics of a possible move. Gannett plans to issue a request for proposals from contractors this month.

KPNX has been at the Central Avenue site since 1956. The television station's two buildings -- a 45,000-square foot office building and a former fire station that stores news vehicles -- are not officially for sale. But rumors of a potential sale have peaked the interest of about a half dozen parties, Misner said.

That includes Arizona State University, which opened a downtown Phoenix campus in 2006.

"We took a tour at the invitation of the Channel 12 management, but we do not have any plans to pursue the building," said Julie Newberg, an ASU spokeswoman.

Other television stations and newspapers have experimented with mingled operations, said Rick Edmonds, a media consolidation expert at Poynter Institute, adding that Florida's Tampa Tribune and Channel 8 (WFLA) have shared the same building for several years.

If Channel 12 moved into the Republic's building, it would be the largest such operation "that I know of," Edmonds said. --- Jahna Berry

HooverDam Feb 3, 2010 12:29 AM

^That would be great if it happened for 2 reasons. If Im reading it correctly it sounds like they'd plan to have their studios have a window to the street a la the Today Show which could be very cool. The Republic building is obviously in an area where lots of tourists and convention goers walk by and it could create a lively and interesting street scene as people watch broadcasts being taped.

Secondly and more importantly Id hope it would mean the awful anti urban fortress that is the current Ch 12 building would be flattened. Its a really prime piece of real estate and I wish it had a better use. When the economy recovers and if Phoenix ever decides to redo Hance park like it needs to, that would be a great place for more midrise condos like Portland Place across the street.

somethingfast Feb 3, 2010 9:11 PM

are there any good jobs in phoenix yet? theres like three great looking chicks there that i would move back for but, damn, last time i was there i could basically flip burgers as a sole career option!

Leo the Dog Feb 3, 2010 9:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by somethingfast (Post 4680500)
are there any good jobs in phoenix yet? theres like three great looking chicks there that i would move back for but, damn, last time i was there i could basically flip burgers as a sole career option!

No.

somethingfast Feb 3, 2010 10:06 PM

that's what i thought. damn that one trick pony economy arizona built itself on!

phxbyrd Feb 3, 2010 10:41 PM

GOP convention
 
If Phoenix gets the GOP convention it would be nice to have both channel 8 and 12 with Downtown sidewalk studios.

Teacher_AZ_84 Feb 4, 2010 1:45 AM

I hope they move their studios. I love seeing news studios in action when I am in Chicago or NY.

HooverDam Feb 4, 2010 2:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by somethingfast (Post 4680500)
are there any good jobs in phoenix yet? theres like three great looking chicks there that i would move back for but, damn, last time i was there i could basically flip burgers as a sole career option!

Um...Id be happy to keep the seat warm for you while you look for a job with any of the 3 :P

EDIT: VV You mentioned their gender, so it goes unsaid.

somethingfast Feb 4, 2010 3:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HooverDam (Post 4681020)
Um...Id be happy to keep the seat warm for you while you look for a job with any of the 3 :P

did i mention they are all psycho??? :D

NorthScottsdale Feb 5, 2010 4:45 AM

So I was downtown today with my department from work to attend the "Get Motivated" business seminar at US Airways Center. It was a great seminar with many speakers such as Laura Bush, Rudy Guliani, Colin Powell, Steve Forbes, Kurt Warner, Tamara Lowe, Zig Zeiglar, and a few others. I shot some quick shots of downtown with my cellphone.. mostly of Cityscape and the Court Tower..

Luhrs

http://i57.photobucket.com/albums/g2...e/downtown.jpg

Court Tower

http://i57.photobucket.com/albums/g2.../downtown1.jpg

http://i57.photobucket.com/albums/g2.../downtown6.jpg

http://i57.photobucket.com/albums/g2.../downtown2.jpg

http://i57.photobucket.com/albums/g2.../downtown3.jpg

http://i57.photobucket.com/albums/g2.../downtown4.jpg

http://i57.photobucket.com/albums/g2.../downtown5.jpg

http://i57.photobucket.com/albums/g2.../downtown7.jpg

dtnphx Feb 5, 2010 5:00 PM

Hey, nice new angles. I particularly like #6. Thanks, man.

HX_Guy Feb 11, 2010 3:04 PM

Quote:

New Owners Re-Launch Century Plaza High-Rise as One Lexington

The Century Plaza condominium high-rise has been re-named One Lexington, the building’s new owners, Lexington Avenue LLP, announced today. The building, located at One East Lexington Ave. in mid-town Phoenix, was officially purchased last week from Milwaukee-based M&I Bank.

Positioned directly on the Central Ave. corridor and in perfect timing with the rising revitalization movement of downtown Phoenix, the building will be re-introduced to the market as a newly defined and modern metropolitan living space complete with first-class amenities, finishing packages and a dramatically lower pricing model than the original residences sold for. The building’s proximity to the Osborn and Central light rail station also offers residents easy access to the energy, amenities and diverse opportunities of downtown Phoenix.

“With the re-branding of One Lexington, we want to clearly define a new chapter in the building’s story,” says Rob Macdonald, managing partner, Lexington Avenue LLP. “One Lexington provides an upscale yet affordable lifestyle in a centralized location.”

Originally a commercial office building for the Century Bank, the award-winning 17-story One Lexington is due to begin sales this spring, and offers 130 condominiums in one-, two-, and three-bedroom models ranging from 734 to 2,846 square feet, with prices tentatively expected to begin at $165,000. Its floor-to-ceiling windows and one-of-a-kind setbacks right on Central Ave. provide incredible views of the Central Corridor and surrounding Camelback Mountain and Piestewa Peak. One Lexington features amenities such as a resort-style pool and spa area, owners’ lounge, expansive fitness center, and a street-level yoga studio, along with unheard-of standard features such as 11’ 10” ceilings, custom Italian cabinetry, Kohler® fixtures, Bosch® appliances, and sustainable bamboo flooring.

Russ Lyon Sotheby's International Realty and Blueprint Global Marketing will be handling sales and marketing, respectively, of One Lexington.

“One Lexington represents a truly unique experience in urban living and is the first Sotheby’s branded high-rise in Arizona,” says David Newcombe of Russ Lyon Sotheby’s International Realty. “Russ Lyon Sotheby’s International Realty is excited to be partnering with Blueprint Global Marketing and Lexington Avenue LLP on such a fitting addition to the lifestyle and energy of the vibrant downtown Phoenix community.”

For additional information about One Lexington, please visit www.onelexington.com.

.

gymratmanaz Feb 11, 2010 3:10 PM

New trees, benches, and other additions are being loaded into the courtyard for phase 1 at Chase Tower. The whole courtyard renovation will be completed by year's end. I recall there being 4 phases.

PHX31 Feb 11, 2010 9:17 PM

I think it has been discussed before, but why again (for what development) is there a tower crane on the west side of 16th street a bit north of Thomas?

Don B. Feb 11, 2010 9:20 PM

^ Don't you remember? It was for a new 55-story office tower. I drive past it everyday. :D

--don

HooverDam Feb 12, 2010 9:33 PM

http://www.azcentral.com/thingstodo/...n-phoenix.html

Quote:

Chef Nobuo Fukuda to open downtown Phoenix restaurant
Nobuo at Teeter House will open at Heritage Square this summer
by Howie Seftel - Feb. 12, 2010 01:59 PM
Republic restaurant critic
It's official: James Beard Award-winner Nobuo Fukuda is headed to downtown Phoenix. His new restaurant, Nobuo at Teeter House, will open this summer in historic Heritage Square, just across the way from another James Beard Award-winner, Chris Bianco and his Pizzeria Bianco. Fukuda has inked a 10-year lease, with an option for five additional years.

At lunch, the restaurant will be a teahouse, serving soups, salads and sandwiches, along with Asian teas. At dinner, it turns into an izakaya, a Japanese tavern serving small plates.

Fukuda also plans to install a four-seat counter where serious foodies can make reservations for the kind of omakase (multicourse tasting menu) dinner he did at Sea Saw. That Old Town Scottsdale restaurant closed almost a year ago, a victim of hard times.


The restaurant will have room for about 35 inside and another 24 on the patio.

It has been quite a week for the increasingly dynamic downtown Phoenix restaurant scene. On Wednesday, La Grande Orange founder and president Bob Lynn announced that he would open LGO Public House at CityScape.

Type

Vicelord John Feb 12, 2010 9:52 PM

effing eff yeah!

I love this shit man. Just when I was starting to get really down about my neighborhood, thinking I spent too much money to live in a place that I put too much stock into, they announce a bunch of big time restaurants. I can literally hit Heritage square with a rock if I throw it while I'm drunk and upside down, it's that close.

If you've ever noticed the moveable letter sign out front of it, and noticed it was all word jumbled to read something obnoxious, that means I did it. I changed "motoring through time" to read "motorboating through tim" two weeks ago. This is my playground, and now my playground is starting to become awesome.

PHX31 Feb 12, 2010 10:11 PM

Steve Nash commercial, with scene from the San Carlos swimming pool area.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tdNiX...layer_embedded

combusean Feb 13, 2010 11:54 AM

On the heels of the above, Cartel Coffee Lab has the grand opening of their second location on 1st St and Washington on Tuesday February 16 from 5:00 to 9:00 PM.

While downtown has several coffee shops, none are open lateish, local, and in the core itself. Getting all three is a welcome addition.

SLC Projects Feb 13, 2010 10:49 PM

What's up Phoenix. We miss having you guys in the Mountain West. I was just watching the video of the "Qwest Building Implosion". What's going to go in it's place?

phxbyrd Feb 13, 2010 11:05 PM

most likely nothing but others may know more. It's too bad the senior highrise can't go through as I would think that market is affected differently than traditional residential.

Don B. Feb 13, 2010 11:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SLC Projects (Post 4698669)
What's up Phoenix. We miss having you guys in the Mountain West. I was just watching the video of the "Qwest Building Implosion". What's going to go in it's place?

There's a pile of rubble there, still present after six months.

Any ordinary homeowner would be arrested for having weeds in their yards, but somebody can knock down a building and leave a pile of rubble? Looks like Haiti there.

--don

Vicelord John Feb 14, 2010 12:09 AM

I tried to play on that rubble... didn't make it very far before security was after me.

phxbyrd Feb 14, 2010 12:50 AM

they can afford security but not landscaping?:hell:

plinko Feb 14, 2010 1:03 AM

Security is a corporate liability (thus necessary).

Landscaping is not.

Vicelord John Feb 14, 2010 2:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by phxbyrd (Post 4698810)
they can afford security but not landscaping?:hell:

nobody is going to sue them for getting cut on grass... but you'd better be sure if I impailed my arm on rebar debris, they would get sued.

NIXPHX77 Feb 14, 2010 4:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PHX31 (Post 4696840)
Steve Nash commercial, with scene from the San Carlos swimming pool area.

I think it is actually the Wyndham's pool area (and entry valet court in another scene.) Funny, tho. Love Nash.

Vicelord John Feb 14, 2010 6:25 AM

The entire film was madE at wyndham. Those are wyndham halls, rooms, pool, front drive, and their Icon lounge.

Don B. Feb 14, 2010 9:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Vicelord John (Post 4698933)
nobody is going to sue them for getting cut on grass... but you'd better be sure if I impailed my arm on rebar debris, they would get sued.

Not if you are an adult trespasser. In Arizona, adult trespassers cannot sue for injuries sustained on another property because they are not a business or guest invitee. They are owed no duty of protection, so unlike many other states, the trespasser is HML in Arizona. HML = hosed as a matter of law.

The only exception to this is if the trespasser can show that the property owner "set a trap" for them. For example, you can't rig up a 12-gauge shotgun to fire when someone opens the front door. Then and only then can an adult trespasser sue for injuries.

I write adult trespassers because children are held to a different standard. If the child was a trespasser, they generally are also HML, with the exception of the "attractive nuisance doctrine." Basically, that means if you have something that is a hazard but would attract the attention of a child and entice them to play on it, then the property owner may have some liability. The classic example of an attractive nuisance is an unfenced trampoline.

Assumption of the risk can also function as a complete bar to recovery. For children, this is tailored based on what a reasonable child of similar age could have appreciated in terms of the hazard and acted accordingly. Generally, the older the child, the more likely assumption of the risk will be used as a defense. For an adult, assumption of the risk in Arizona will likely be fatal to most personal injury claims. It would be difficult to survive a motion for summary judgment if you are the plaintiff and assumption of the risk applies. Even if you somehow make it to a jury, the defense will get a jury instruction that reads as follows:

"Jurors, if you reasonably believe that the plaintiff properly appreciated the risk and voluntarily chose to incur that risk, and then sustained injury as a result of that risk, you must find for the defendant in this case." Given Arizona juries generally don't like plaintiffs (two-thirds of personal injury cases tried in Arizona result in defense verdicts), they are often more than happy to read that and, in essence, say to the plaintiff "You get zero. Have a nice day."

Given your facts, that you would be a trespasser and an adult climbing over crumbled stone and rebar, you would have virtually no chance in Arizona of recovering a dime for your injuries. Even if you could somehow get around the trespasser issue, the fact as an adult you could see the debris and voluntarily chose to go climbing through it like an idiot, the jury would slam you for assumption of the risk. Basically, Arizona has a pretty practical personal injury system. You can't collect money in this state for being a moron, generally speaking.

--don

phxbyrd Feb 14, 2010 3:42 PM

so after you put up a good, high, sturdy fence and post signs to keep out what are your requirements to have live security on site 24/7?

Vicelord John Feb 14, 2010 5:44 PM

Hm. I guess arizona has one thing over other states.

mwadswor Feb 14, 2010 5:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Vicelord John (Post 4698933)
nobody is going to sue them for getting cut on grass... but you'd better be sure if I impailed my arm on rebar debris, they would get sued.

Assuming they ignored Don's very thorough legal opinion (thanks Don), you'd still think grass or gravel would be cheaper than continually paying for security... especially since it'll eventually still have to get cleaned up.

HooverDam Feb 15, 2010 8:20 AM

http://www.azcentral.com/community/p...ntown0215.html

Quote:

Phoenix eyes new campus land buy
Surplus bond money to be used for vacant-motel site

4 comments by Jahna Berry - Feb. 15, 2010 12:00 AM
The Arizona Republic
The same week that Phoenix leaders imposed a 2 percent food tax to prevent layoffs and painful cuts to city services, City Council members agreed to spend $6 million to buy a vacant motel so Arizona State University can expand its downtown campus.

The city plans to buy the old Ramada Inn at 401 N. First Street with $5 million left over from a 2006 city bond that was enacted largely to help construct ASU's downtown Phoenix campus, plus roughly $1.3 million from the city-owned Sheraton Phoenix Downtown Hotel's capital improvement fund.


The city and the motel property's owner, Phoenix-based City Centre LLC, have not finalized the sale but hope to before it is due to be sold at a foreclosure auction on March 2.

The city has been eying the property for years but was put off by the price, which was once as high as $30 million. Now, it wants to buy the property before it goes to auction, where it may lose it to another buyer. Records show City Centre owes its lender $5.2 million.

Until ASU officials decide what to do with the site, Phoenix plans to raze the motel and build an overflow parking lot with up to 250 spaces for the Sheraton.

The Phoenix City Council unanimously approved the deal Feb 3. The city-controlled hotel board approved the transaction on Friday.

"I felt this was a good purchase for the city at this time," said Councilman Bill Gates. "The city could acquire property important to downtown and important to the ASU campus."

But a taxpayer advocacy group said the city should at the very least use the extra money to pay off debt already incurred for the campus.

Kevin McCarthy, president of the Arizona Tax Research Association, said the hotel purchase also highlights government tactics to spend money on projects not specifically approved by voters.

Buying the Ramada Inn was not specified in the spending plan detailed on the city's Web site and to the media in the days leading up to the bond vote, city officials acknowledge. But it was part of early plans for the campus, city officials said. The vote gave the city permission to borrow $220 million to build various ASU facilities. The city sells bonds to raise money, which it pays off with property taxes.

But the taxpayer group concedes the city's deal still is legal because the property fits within ballot language for long-term plans for the campus.

Common issue

The ballot language for Prop. 3 indicates that Phoenix would issue bonds "for the purposes of improving and expanding high school, higher education and health science facilities by acquiring land and constructing, reconstructing, improving, repairing and equipping new and existing facilities, including . . . an Arizona State University campus."

Using bond money for capital projects not specified to voters is an issue that has been a problem for decades, said McCarthy of the Arizona Tax Research Association.

"They give the taxpayers a list of specific purposes when they approve it, because they don't want to tell them this is just going to be slush fund," he said.

The leftover bond money couldn't be used to fund threatened city operations because there are limits on how bond money can be used, but the city could have chosen to not spend it, McCarthy said.

Phoenix leaders defended the purchase, one they have wanted to make for some years but which had been too expensive. Now that the motel is in the pre-foreclosure process, the price has dropped significantly, they say. The city also had an agreement with the owner, City Centre, to develop part of the property for ASU.

Bond ballot measures are written broadly so cities have flexibility in case needs or project costs change, said Deputy City Manager Rick Naimark. The Ramada site was part of early presentations to the bond committee and was mentioned in the city's early intergovernmental agreement with ASU, he said. But the land sale wasn't part of later plans because the city couldn't afford the property, he added.

Councilman Sal DiCiccio is a frequent critic of city spending, but he backed the ASU deal.

"This fulfills to obligation of the ballot proposition that voters approved," said DiCiccio, adding that the land is within the "footprint" of the original vision for the ASU campus.

The decision "will be controversial," DiCiccio said, "but it is what it is."

ASU projects

Phoenix wrapped up ASU construction and land purchases in 2009. Projects included a $71 million building for the journalism school, a $34 million Civic Space Park, and a nursing-school addition.

The city borrowed more money to make the nursing school larger, increasing the addition's price tag from $19 million to $29 million.

At the time, city leaders thought they had run out of ASU bond funds.

However, after all the projects were complete, city officials learned that Phoenix had $5 million left over from the ASU bond because costs were less than expected, Naimark said.

ASU has not decided how it will use the Ramada property, said Richard Stanley, an ASU official who oversees planning issues.

The property may not be developed for three to five years, he said. It could be used for more classrooms, offices or to relocate the ASU law school, he said.

Budget crisis

The purchase comes as Phoenix grapples with a historic budget crisis.

Last week, the City Council voted to implement a five-year food tax on milk, meat, vegetables and other foods, which will generate an estimated $12.5 million for the fiscal year that ends June 30 and another $50 million for fiscal 2011.

It faces a $240 million shortfall in the general fund, which pays for basic city services. City leaders have asked police and firefighters to take salary cuts, and are considering cutting roughly $70 million in services which includes shutting libraries, closing arts centers and slashing parks programs.

To save money, the city has delayed construction projects that would incur extra staffing costs, but property purchases don't lead to higher operating costs, said city spokeswoman Barbara Frazier.

I'm glad the city got the Ramada Inn on the cheap, it'll be interesting to see if ASU does want to move the Law School. The Ramada in is part of of a 3 block span (Monroe to Taylor, 1st to 2nd streets) thats just total crap, giant structures that take up entire blocks, it'll be nice to see one of them replaced with something hopefully more urban.

combusean Feb 15, 2010 10:50 AM

The Ramada has a whole side of street-front retail spaces that are all locked up at the moment.

Don B. Feb 15, 2010 3:07 PM

It will be a parking lot for a long time before it is anything else. For some reason, I don't think this is a good thing.

--don

gymratmanaz Feb 15, 2010 3:15 PM

A parking lot will suck, but in the long run, another addition to DT ASU is a great thing.

HX_Guy Feb 15, 2010 11:43 PM

Quote:

Native American Connections plans 350-unit housing project
Phoenix Business Journal
Construction will begin this spring on an affordable housing community in central Phoenix.

Native American Connections, a nonprofit focusing on affordable housing and benefits to Native Americans, plans for the property to be completed in spring 2011 and include more than 350 units.

Devine Legacy on Central will be built at Central Avenue across from the Native American Community Service Center, which also houses NAC. Units will include flats, townhomes and lofts.

According to an NAC press release, the monthly rent will be set $200 below market rates. This will be NAC’s eighth affordable housing property in central Phoenix.
The Native American Community Service Center is at Central and Campbell so I'm trying to figure out where this thing is going to go because 350 units is a pretty large building.

Are they going to demolish the buying at Central and Minnezona? I remember a while back there was talk that the building would be demolished and something built in its place.

http://nitnelav.com/CentralandMinnezona.jpg

combusean Feb 16, 2010 12:14 AM

The west half of the Ramada property should be saved for now. Get the top units rented out affordably and the street-front retail spaces in business. It would do a lot to draw interest to the site so ASU can find a good private partner to build an academic mixed-use complex as a replacement when the economy allows.

HooverDam Feb 16, 2010 12:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HX_Guy (Post 4701396)

Does anyone know if this is a real historic building or just a newer building made to look old? Either way I've always liked it and thought it brought something to the eclectic mix of structures around that area and would hate to see it go, especially with so many dirt lots nearby.

combusean Feb 16, 2010 1:06 AM

That building was made to look old in the fifties and they didn't do a particularly good job. What gives it away are the windows: they look to be the wrong size for the period ithey're trying to emulate. They're metal too, and would look like absolute garbage if they were wood.

The design and slope of the roof with no attic vents makes it appear distinctly modern. I would be very surprised if this building was pre-WW2, and will eat my hat if I'm wrong. Fortunately, I don't wear a hat.

Vicelord John Feb 16, 2010 1:36 AM

As if that area isnt over run with drunk indians already. Oh well, north midtown = newest ghetto

glynnjamin Feb 16, 2010 3:44 PM

^I hate to say it but ever since they built that Catherine Arms navajo breeding ground on Fillmore, that ghetto Circle K across from my house has become more ghetto. I'm seriously pissed about all of the drunk indians I see standing on the corner every day now.


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